Top 42 Slang For Explored – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to navigating the ever-evolving world of slang, staying updated is key. From the latest trends to the most obscure expressions, we’ve got you covered. Join us as we unravel and dissect the most explored slang terms that are sure to keep you in the loop and ahead of the curve. Get ready to expand your linguistic repertoire and impress your peers with our definitive guide to the language of today.

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1. Dived into

To “dive into” something means to explore or investigate it thoroughly and with great enthusiasm.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I dived into the research to uncover the truth.”
  • A traveler might share, “I dived into the local culture and tried all the traditional food.”
  • In a discussion about a new hobby, someone might say, “I dived into photography and learned all the technical aspects.”

2. Delved into

To “delve into” something means to explore or investigate it deeply and with great curiosity.

  • For instance, a historian might say, “I delved into the archives to find evidence of the historical event.”
  • A student might share, “I delved into the topic and found some fascinating research.”
  • In a conversation about personal growth, someone might say, “I delved into my emotions and discovered a new level of self-awareness.”

3. Ventured into

To “venture into” something means to explore or investigate it with bravery and a sense of adventure.

  • For example, an explorer might say, “I ventured into the uncharted territory and discovered new species.”
  • A hiker might share, “I ventured into the wilderness and had an incredible camping experience.”
  • In a discussion about trying new experiences, someone might say, “I ventured into skydiving and overcame my fear of heights.”

4. Investigated

To “investigate” something means to explore or examine it closely in order to uncover facts or gather information.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “I investigated the crime scene for any clues.”
  • A scientist might share, “I investigated the phenomenon and conducted several experiments.”
  • In a conversation about a suspicious event, someone might say, “I investigated the situation and found out the truth.”

5. Probed

To “probe” something means to explore or examine it thoroughly and in detail, often with the intention of uncovering hidden information or understanding its nature better.

  • For example, a researcher might say, “I probed the data to find patterns and correlations.”
  • A therapist might share, “I probed the client’s feelings to understand the underlying causes.”
  • In a discussion about a complex issue, someone might say, “I probed the topic from multiple angles to gain a comprehensive understanding.”

6. Scoured

To scour means to search or investigate something thoroughly. It implies a deep and detailed examination or search for information or objects.

  • For example, “I scoured the internet for hours looking for the perfect recipe.”
  • A detective might say, “We scoured the crime scene for any evidence that could help solve the case.”
  • A journalist might write, “I scoured through old archives to find historical documents for my research.”

7. Poked around

To poke around means to explore or search in a casual and somewhat aimless manner. It implies a less focused or purposeful exploration, often driven by curiosity.

  • For instance, “I poked around in the attic, hoping to find some forgotten treasures.”
  • A traveler might say, “I love to poke around local markets and discover hidden gems.”
  • Someone exploring a new city might mention, “I spent the afternoon poking around the shops and cafes in the city center.”

8. Sifted through

To sift through means to carefully sort and examine a collection of items or information. It implies a methodical and thorough examination, often with the intention of finding specific items or details.

  • For example, “I sifted through a box of old photographs, trying to find a picture of my grandparents.”
  • A researcher might say, “I sifted through hundreds of scientific papers to find relevant studies for my literature review.”
  • A lawyer might mention, “I had to sift through piles of documents to find the evidence we needed for the case.”

9. Explored the ins and outs

To explore the ins and outs means to thoroughly examine and understand all the details and intricacies of a subject or situation. It implies a comprehensive exploration, often with the goal of gaining a deep understanding.

  • For instance, “I explored the ins and outs of the new software to become proficient.”
  • A business owner might say, “I need to explore the ins and outs of the market before launching a new product.”
  • A student might mention, “I spent hours exploring the ins and outs of a complex mathematical problem.”

10. Went through with a fine-tooth comb

To go through with a fine-tooth comb means to examine something meticulously and in great detail. It implies a thorough and careful examination, often with the intention of finding even the smallest details or flaws.

  • For example, “I went through the contract with a fine-tooth comb to ensure there were no hidden clauses.”
  • A forensic scientist might say, “We went through the crime scene with a fine-tooth comb, looking for any trace of evidence.”
  • A proofreader might mention, “I went through the document with a fine-tooth comb, correcting every punctuation and grammar mistake.”

11. Checked out

This term is often used to describe casually looking at or visiting a place or thing. It can also mean to inspect or examine something.

  • For example, “I checked out the new restaurant in town and the food was amazing!”
  • A person might say, “I checked out the latest fashion trends online.”
  • Another might comment, “I checked out the new exhibit at the museum and it was really interesting.”

12. Surveyed

This term refers to the act of assessing or examining an area or situation, often in a systematic or comprehensive way.

  • For instance, “We surveyed the land before building the new house.”
  • A researcher might say, “We surveyed a sample of the population to gather data.”
  • In a business context, someone might comment, “We surveyed our customers to gather feedback on our products.”

13. Examined

This term means to closely look at or analyze something in detail.

  • For example, “The doctor examined the patient’s symptoms to make a diagnosis.”
  • A student might say, “I examined the data to find patterns.”
  • In a legal context, a lawyer might state, “We examined the evidence to build our case.”

14. Scrutinized

This term means to carefully examine or analyze something in great detail, often with a critical or skeptical eye.

  • For instance, “The auditor scrutinized the company’s financial records.”
  • A journalist might say, “I scrutinized the politician’s statements for inconsistencies.”
  • In a scientific experiment, a researcher might comment, “We scrutinized the data to ensure accuracy.”

15. Traversed

This term refers to the act of exploring or traveling through an area or terrain.

  • For example, “We traversed the mountain range on our hiking trip.”
  • A traveler might say, “I traversed the streets of Tokyo and experienced the vibrant city.”
  • In a nature documentary, the narrator might describe, “The animals traversed the vast savannah in search of water.”

16. Wandered through

This phrase suggests a relaxed and unhurried exploration of a place or area. It implies a sense of leisure and curiosity.

  • For example, “We wandered through the streets of Paris, stopping at cafes along the way.”
  • A traveler might say, “I love to wander through the local markets in search of unique souvenirs.”
  • Someone exploring a forest might describe their experience as, “I wandered through the woods, taking in the sights and sounds of nature.”

17. Roamed around

To roam around means to wander or move about without a specific destination or purpose. It suggests a sense of freedom and spontaneity.

  • For instance, “We roamed around the city, stumbling upon hidden gems.”
  • A person exploring a new neighborhood might say, “I like to roam around and discover new shops and restaurants.”
  • A traveler might describe their experience as, “I spent the day roaming around the ancient ruins, imagining the lives of the people who once lived there.”

18. Journeyed through

To journey through something means to travel through it, typically with a purpose or goal in mind. It implies a more intentional and purposeful exploration.

  • For example, “We journeyed through the mountains, stopping at various viewpoints along the way.”
  • A person exploring a foreign country might say, “I want to journey through the different regions and experience the local culture.”
  • Someone describing a road trip might say, “We journeyed through the countryside, stopping at small towns and attractions along the way.”

19. Explored every nook and cranny

This phrase suggests a meticulous and thorough exploration of a place, leaving no area unexplored. It implies a sense of curiosity and a desire to discover every hidden detail.

  • For instance, “We explored every nook and cranny of the abandoned mansion, searching for clues.”
  • A person describing their hiking adventure might say, “We explored every nook and cranny of the trail, discovering hidden waterfalls and scenic viewpoints.”
  • Someone exploring a museum might say, “I love to explore every nook and cranny of the exhibits, reading every plaque and examining every artifact.”

20. Looked into

To look into something means to investigate or examine it closely. It implies a desire to gain knowledge or understanding about a particular subject or situation.

  • For example, “We looked into the history of the town, researching its origins and notable events.”
  • A person exploring a new hobby might say, “I’m looking into different classes and workshops to learn more about it.”
  • Someone describing their research process might say, “I looked into various sources to gather information for my project.”

21. Checked over

This phrase refers to quickly or briefly examining something to ensure that everything is in order or to make sure nothing is missed. It implies a cursory or superficial inspection.

  • For example, “I checked over my essay before submitting it.”
  • A teacher might say, “Please check over your work before turning it in.”
  • Someone might mention, “I checked over the document for any errors before sending it.”

22. Went over with a fine-tooth comb

This phrase means to carefully and meticulously examine or review something in great detail, leaving no stone unturned. It suggests a comprehensive and detailed inspection.

  • For instance, “I went over the contract with a fine-tooth comb to catch any errors.”
  • A detective might say, “We need to go over the crime scene with a fine-tooth comb to find any evidence.”
  • Someone might mention, “I went over the report with a fine-tooth comb to ensure its accuracy.”

23. Rummaged through

This phrase describes the act of searching through something in a disorganized or hasty manner, often in order to find something specific or valuable. It implies a less systematic or meticulous approach.

  • For example, “I rummaged through my closet looking for my missing keys.”
  • A person might say, “I had to rummage through a pile of papers to find that document.”
  • Someone might mention, “I rummaged through the drawer to find a pen.”

24. Dug into

This phrase means to thoroughly investigate or explore a subject or topic, often with great enthusiasm or curiosity. It implies a deep and thorough examination.

  • For instance, “I dug into the history of the ancient civilization.”
  • A researcher might say, “I’m excited to dig into this new area of study.”
  • Someone might mention, “I dug into the data to find meaningful insights.”

25. Inspected

This word refers to the act of closely and carefully examining something to assess its condition, quality, or compliance with standards. It suggests a deliberate and methodical evaluation.

  • For example, “The mechanic inspected my car to identify any issues.”
  • An inspector might say, “I need to inspect this building for safety compliance.”
  • Someone might mention, “I inspected the product for any defects before packaging it.”

26. Tracked down

This phrase is often used to describe the act of finding someone or something after a thorough search. It implies a sense of perseverance and determination in the search process.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We tracked down the suspect and arrested him.”
  • A journalist might write, “After weeks of investigation, we finally tracked down the elusive source.”
  • In a conversation about finding a rare item, someone might say, “I tracked down that limited edition comic book I’ve been searching for.”

27. Hunted down

This phrase conveys a sense of actively seeking and capturing someone or something, often with a strong focus on the determination and effort put into the pursuit.

  • For instance, a bounty hunter might say, “I hunted down the fugitive and brought him to justice.”
  • In a discussion about a video game, a player might say, “I hunted down all the hidden collectibles in the game.”
  • Someone might use this phrase metaphorically and say, “I hunted down the best deal on that new gadget.”

28. Explored the depths of

This phrase suggests a thorough and comprehensive exploration of a subject or area, often implying a deep understanding or knowledge gained from the experience.

  • For example, a scientist might say, “We explored the depths of the ocean to study its unique ecosystems.”
  • In a conversation about self-discovery, someone might say, “I explored the depths of my own mind through meditation.”
  • A traveler might write, “I explored the depths of the ancient ruins, uncovering their hidden secrets.”

29. Explored the vastness of

This phrase conveys the idea of exploring a wide and expansive area or concept, often suggesting a sense of awe and wonder at the scale of what is being explored.

  • For instance, an astronaut might say, “I explored the vastness of space during my mission.”
  • In a discussion about nature, someone might say, “I explored the vastness of the Grand Canyon and felt humbled by its beauty.”
  • A photographer might caption their picture, “Exploring the vastness of the desert, capturing its endless horizons.”

30. Explored the boundaries of

This phrase implies pushing the limits or challenging the established boundaries of a subject or concept, often with a sense of innovation or experimentation.

  • For example, an artist might say, “I explored the boundaries of traditional painting techniques to create a unique style.”
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might say, “Scientists are constantly exploring the boundaries of what is possible.”
  • A musician might describe their latest album as, “An exploration of the boundaries of genre blending and musical experimentation.”

31. Explored the possibilities of

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has thoroughly considered and examined various possibilities or potential outcomes.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’ve explored the possibilities of starting my own business, and I think it’s the right move.”
  • In a discussion about career choices, someone might mention, “I’ve explored the possibilities of different professions, but I keep coming back to my passion for art.”
  • A student might say, “Before choosing a major, I explored the possibilities of various fields to find the right fit for me.”

32. Explored the unknown

This phrase is used to describe the act of exploring or investigating something that is unfamiliar or uncharted.

  • For instance, a traveler might say, “I love exploring the unknown and discovering new places.”
  • In a discussion about scientific research, someone might mention, “Scientists are constantly pushing the boundaries and exploring the unknown.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might say, “Stepping out of your comfort zone is essential for exploring the unknown and expanding your horizons.”

33. Explored the uncharted territory

This phrase is used to describe the act of venturing into an area or field that has not been previously explored or documented.

  • For example, a scientist might say, “Our team is excited to explore the uncharted territory of deep-sea ecosystems.”
  • In a discussion about space exploration, someone might mention, “Astronauts are constantly pushing the boundaries and exploring uncharted territory in outer space.”
  • A person discussing entrepreneurship might say, “Starting a new business is like exploring uncharted territory, with both risks and opportunities.”

This phrase is used to describe the act of investigating or discovering something that was previously concealed or unknown.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “We explored the hidden clues and solved the mystery.”
  • In a discussion about historical research, someone might mention, “Archaeologists have explored the hidden chambers of ancient tombs.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might say, “Exploring the hidden aspects of yourself can lead to self-discovery and personal transformation.”

35. Explored the forbidden

This phrase is used to describe the act of delving into something that is prohibited or off-limits.

  • For example, a writer might say, “In my latest novel, I explored the forbidden love between two characters.”
  • In a discussion about societal taboos, someone might mention, “Artists often explore the forbidden to challenge social norms and provoke thought.”
  • A person discussing personal experiences might say, “I’ve explored the forbidden aspects of life and learned valuable lessons along the way.”

36. Explored the unexplored

This phrase is used to describe the act of exploring places or ideas that have not been previously explored or discovered. It implies a sense of curiosity and adventure.

  • For example, a traveler might say, “I decided to explore the unexplored regions of the Amazon rainforest.”
  • A scientist might discuss their research by saying, “We are working to explore the unexplored depths of the ocean.”
  • A writer might use the phrase metaphorically, saying, “Through my poetry, I aim to explore the unexplored emotions within us all.”

37. Explored the untouched

This phrase is used to describe the act of exploring places or things that have not been disturbed or altered by human activity. It conveys a sense of discovering something in its natural state.

  • For instance, a hiker might say, “I hiked through the untouched wilderness of the national park.”
  • An archaeologist might describe their excavation by saying, “We carefully explored the untouched ruins of an ancient civilization.”
  • A photographer might capture the beauty of an untouched landscape and say, “I love exploring and photographing untouched natural wonders.”

38. Explored the remote

This phrase is used to describe the act of exploring places that are far away from populated areas or difficult to access. It suggests a sense of adventure and discovery in hard-to-reach locations.

  • For example, an adventurer might say, “I trekked through the remote mountains of Nepal.”
  • A journalist might report on a remote village and say, “I traveled to the remote region to document the lives of its inhabitants.”
  • A traveler might describe their experience by saying, “Exploring remote islands allowed me to disconnect from the world and connect with nature.”

39. Explored the wild

This phrase is used to describe the act of exploring natural environments that are not controlled or influenced by human activity. It conveys a sense of adventure and the discovery of untouched wilderness.

  • For instance, an outdoor enthusiast might say, “I love exploring the wild and camping in remote locations.”
  • A wildlife photographer might describe their experience by saying, “I spent weeks exploring the wild to capture stunning images of animals in their natural habitat.”
  • A nature lover might express their passion by saying, “There’s something exhilarating about exploring the wild and witnessing the beauty of untouched landscapes.”

40. Explored the urban jungle

This phrase is used to describe the act of exploring urban environments, particularly busy and densely populated cities. It implies a sense of adventure and discovery within the bustling streets and structures of a city.

  • For example, a tourist might say, “I explored the urban jungle of New York City and visited all the famous landmarks.”
  • An urban explorer might describe their hobby by saying, “I love exploring the hidden gems and abandoned buildings in the urban jungle.”
  • A photographer might capture the energy of a city and say, “I enjoy exploring the urban jungle and capturing the vibrant street life.”

41. Plumbed

To “plumb” something means to fully explore or investigate it. It is often used to describe a thorough examination or understanding of a subject or topic.

  • For example, a journalist might write, “The reporter plumbed the depths of the corruption scandal to uncover the truth.”
  • In a discussion about a complex scientific theory, someone might say, “I’ve plumbed the depths of this concept and still have so much to learn.”
  • A student studying for a test might say, “I need to plumb the textbook to ensure I understand all the material.”

42. Explored

To “explore” something means to investigate or examine it in detail. It implies a sense of curiosity and discovery, often involving the search for new information or experiences.

  • For instance, a traveler might say, “I explored the ancient ruins of Machu Picchu and was in awe of its beauty.”
  • In a conversation about a new hobby, someone might share, “I’ve recently explored the world of photography and discovered a passion for capturing moments.”
  • A scientist might explain, “We’re constantly exploring new frontiers in space to expand our understanding of the universe.”
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