Top 49 Slang For Expound – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing ideas in a detailed and comprehensive manner, sometimes regular words just don’t cut it. That’s where slang for “expound” comes into play. If you’re looking to add some flair to your conversations or writing, our team has you covered with a list of trendy and fun expressions that will take your communication skills to the next level. Get ready to impress your friends and colleagues with these fresh ways to expound on any topic!

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1. Break it down

This phrase is used to request a thorough explanation or analysis of a topic or concept.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let me break it down for you so you can understand.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might ask, “Can you break down the steps of the project for us?”
  • A friend might say, “Break it down for me. I don’t quite get what you’re saying.”

2. Lay it out

This slang phrase means to provide a clear and concise explanation or presentation of information.

  • For instance, a manager might say, “I’m going to lay out the plan for the upcoming project.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I’ll lay it out for you why this policy is necessary.”
  • A teacher might instruct a student, “Lay out your argument in a logical manner.”

3. Spell it out

When someone asks you to “spell it out,” they are requesting a clear and detailed explanation or clarification.

  • For example, a boss might say, “I need you to spell out the steps of the process for the new employee.”
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “Can you spell out what you mean by ‘success’?”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Spell out your reasoning for choosing that answer.”

4. Elaborate

To elaborate means to expand on or provide additional information or details about a topic or idea.

  • For instance, a presenter might say, “I’ll elaborate on this point in the next slide.”
  • In a discussion, someone might ask, “Can you elaborate on your argument? I’m not quite convinced.”
  • A writer might be instructed, “You need to elaborate on this scene to create a more vivid picture for the reader.”

5. Dive deep

This slang phrase means to thoroughly explore or analyze a topic or concept, often going beyond surface-level understanding.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “In this article, we’re going to dive deep into the causes of climate change.”
  • In a discussion about a book, someone might say, “Let’s dive deep into the symbolism used by the author.”
  • A teacher might encourage students, “Don’t be afraid to dive deep into the text and analyze it from different perspectives.”

6. Get into the nitty-gritty

To delve deeply into a topic or issue and examine all the intricate details and complexities. This phrase is often used when someone wants to thoroughly analyze or explain something.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let’s get into the nitty-gritty of this math problem and break it down step by step.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Before we make a decision, we need to get into the nitty-gritty of the financial projections.”
  • A journalist might write, “In this article, we will get into the nitty-gritty of the latest scientific research on climate change.”

7. Flesh out

To provide more details or develop a concept further. This phrase is often used when someone wants to add depth or substance to an idea or plan.

  • For instance, a writer might say, “I need to flesh out the characters in my novel to make them more relatable.”
  • In a brainstorming session, someone might suggest, “Let’s flesh out this marketing campaign with specific strategies and target audiences.”
  • A designer might explain, “I’ll take your initial concept and flesh it out with colors, textures, and additional elements.”

8. Get to the bottom of

To investigate or explore something in order to discover the underlying cause or truth. This phrase is often used when someone wants to find out the real reason behind a situation or to resolve a mystery.

  • For example, a detective might say, “I’m determined to get to the bottom of this crime and find the perpetrator.”
  • In a scientific study, researchers might aim to “get to the bottom of” a phenomenon by conducting rigorous experiments and analysis.
  • A journalist might write, “In this investigative report, we will try to get to the bottom of the corruption scandal.”

9. Shed light on

To provide clarification or understanding on a topic or issue. This phrase is often used when someone wants to reveal new information or insights that bring clarity to a situation.

  • For instance, a professor might say, “This research study sheds light on the impact of social media on mental health.”
  • In a documentary, the narrator might explain, “Through interviews with experts, this film sheds light on the history of the civil rights movement.”
  • A journalist might write, “This article aims to shed light on the controversial policies of the government and their implications for the economy.”

10. Go in-depth

To examine or analyze something in great detail and with a comprehensive approach. This phrase is often used when someone wants to delve deeply into a topic and explore all its aspects.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “In this interview, we will go in-depth on the artist’s creative process and inspirations.”
  • In a research paper, a scholar might write, “This study goes in-depth on the historical context of the conflict and its long-term consequences.”
  • A podcast host might say, “In this episode, we will go in-depth on the latest developments in space exploration and the future of human colonization.”

11. Go into specifics

This phrase means to delve into the specific details or aspects of a topic or subject.

  • For example, during a presentation, a speaker might say, “Now let’s go into specifics about each feature of the product.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might ask, “Can you go into specifics about the plot twists without spoiling it?”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Make sure to go into specifics when writing your research papers.”

12. Go into particulars

This phrase is similar to “go into specifics” and means to discuss or explain specific details or aspects of a topic.

  • For instance, during a debate, a debater might say, “I would like to go into particulars about the economic impact of this policy.”
  • In a conversation about a recipe, someone might ask, “Can you go into particulars about the measurements and cooking time?”
  • A journalist might say, “In my article, I will go into particulars about the historical context of this event.”

13. Get down to brass tacks

This phrase means to focus on the most important or essential details or aspects of a topic or matter.

  • For example, during a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s get down to brass tacks and discuss the budget.”
  • In a negotiation, one party might say, “Enough small talk, let’s get down to brass tacks and talk about the terms.”
  • A manager might tell their team, “In this meeting, we need to get down to brass tacks and address the key issues.”

14. Get to the heart of the matter

This phrase means to address or discuss the central or most important issue or aspect of a topic or matter.

  • For instance, during a therapy session, a therapist might say, “Let’s get to the heart of the matter and talk about your childhood experiences.”
  • In a political debate, a candidate might say, “We need to get to the heart of the matter and address the root causes of poverty.”
  • A journalist might write, “In this article, I aim to get to the heart of the matter and uncover the truth.”

15. Get to the crux of the matter

This phrase means to reach or address the essential or most important point or aspect of a topic or matter.

  • For example, during a team meeting, someone might say, “Let’s cut to the chase and get to the crux of the matter.”
  • In a court trial, a lawyer might say, “Your Honor, I will now get to the crux of the matter and present the key evidence.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “In this lesson, we will get to the crux of the matter and focus on the main concepts.”

16. Get to the gist of

To provide a concise summary or main point of a topic or idea. “Get to the gist of” means to focus on the essential or most important aspects.

  • For example, in a presentation, someone might say, “Let me get to the gist of my argument.”
  • In a conversation about a book, a person might ask, “Can you get to the gist of the story without giving away any spoilers?”
  • A teacher might instruct their students, “When writing a summary, make sure to get to the gist of the article.”

17. Go into detail

To provide thorough and comprehensive information or explanation about a topic. “Go into detail” means to delve deeper into the specifics or intricacies.

  • For instance, a presenter might say, “Now, let’s go into detail about each step of the process.”
  • During a discussion, someone might say, “I can go into detail about the historical context if you’re interested.”
  • A journalist might write, “In the interview, the expert went into detail about the scientific research behind the discovery.”

18. Lay it all out

To present or explain something in a clear and comprehensive manner. “Lay it all out” means to provide a full and detailed explanation or account.

  • For example, a manager might say, “Let me lay it all out for you, so you understand the project.”
  • During a debate, someone might state, “I’m going to lay it all out and present my case.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “In your essay, make sure to lay out your arguments and evidence clearly.”

19. Break it all down

To dissect or analyze something into its individual components or elements in order to explain it thoroughly. “Break it all down” means to simplify or clarify a complex topic.

  • For instance, a presenter might say, “Let’s break it all down into manageable steps.”
  • During a discussion, someone might say, “Can you break it all down for me? I’m having trouble understanding.”
  • A teacher might explain, “In this lesson, we will break down the concept of fractions into smaller parts for better understanding.”

20. Get into the weeds

To delve deeply into the intricate or detailed aspects of a topic. “Get into the weeds” means to concentrate on the specific and often complex elements.

  • For example, a researcher might say, “Now, let’s get into the weeds of the data analysis.”
  • During a meeting, someone might suggest, “We need to get into the weeds of this issue to find a solution.”
  • A writer might advise, “When writing a detailed report, make sure to get into the weeds and provide specific examples.”

21. Get to the bottom of it

To delve into a situation or problem in order to uncover the truth or find a solution. This phrase suggests a thorough examination or analysis.

  • For example, if there is a mystery surrounding a crime, a detective might say, “We need to get to the bottom of it to find the culprit.”
  • In a discussion about a complex issue, someone might say, “Let’s get to the bottom of it and understand all the factors involved.”
  • A journalist might write, “In order to provide accurate reporting, we must get to the bottom of the story and verify all the facts.”

22. Get to the nitty-gritty

To concentrate on the most important or crucial aspects of a situation or topic. This phrase implies getting down to the essential or fundamental details.

  • For instance, in a business meeting, a manager might say, “Let’s skip the small talk and get to the nitty-gritty of our project.”
  • When discussing a problem, someone might suggest, “Instead of avoiding the issue, let’s get to the nitty-gritty and address the root cause.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “Now is the time to focus on the nitty-gritty and execute our game plan.”

23. Get to the meat of it

To concentrate on the central or most important aspect of a situation or topic. This phrase suggests getting to the heart or core of the matter.

  • For example, in a debate, someone might say, “Let’s get to the meat of the argument and address the key issues.”
  • When discussing a book or movie, a critic might write, “The story takes a while to get to the meat of it, but once it does, it becomes truly engaging.”
  • A teacher might instruct their students, “In order to understand this concept, we need to get to the meat of it and grasp the underlying principles.”

24. Get to the crux of it

To concentrate on the essential or pivotal aspect of a situation or topic. This phrase implies getting to the core or heart of the matter.

  • For instance, in a negotiation, someone might say, “Let’s get to the crux of the issue and find a mutually beneficial solution.”
  • When analyzing a problem, a consultant might suggest, “We need to get to the crux of it in order to identify the underlying cause.”
  • A journalist might write, “In order to understand the impact of this policy, we must get to the crux of it and examine its consequences.”

25. Get to the core of it

To concentrate on the basic or foundational element of a situation or topic. This phrase suggests getting to the central or essential point.

  • For example, in a therapy session, a psychologist might say, “Let’s get to the core of it and explore the root causes of your anxiety.”
  • When discussing a problem, someone might suggest, “Instead of focusing on the symptoms, let’s get to the core of it and address the underlying issues.”
  • A mentor might advise their mentee, “To truly excel in this field, you need to get to the core of it and master the foundational principles.”

26. Get to the essence of it

To simplify or distill a complex idea or concept to its core essence or main point. This phrase is often used when someone wants to cut through the details and get to the most important part.

  • For example, in a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s get to the essence of this proposal and focus on the key benefits.”
  • In a conversation about a book, a reader might comment, “The author really gets to the essence of human nature in this novel.”
  • A teacher might instruct a student, “When writing your essay, make sure you get to the essence of your argument early on.”

27. Get to the root of it

To uncover or identify the underlying cause or source of a problem or issue. This phrase is often used when someone wants to understand the fundamental reasons behind a situation.

  • For instance, in a therapy session, a psychologist might say, “Let’s get to the root of your anxiety and explore its origins.”
  • In a political discussion, someone might argue, “We need to get to the root of corruption in order to create meaningful change.”
  • A detective investigating a crime might say, “I need to get to the root of this case and find out who’s responsible.”

28. Get to the heart of it

To understand or grasp the core or central aspect of a matter or issue. This phrase is often used when someone wants to emphasize the importance of understanding the most significant part.

  • For example, in a conversation about a film, a critic might say, “The director really gets to the heart of the human condition in this movie.”
  • In a discussion about a complex problem, someone might argue, “We need to get to the heart of the issue in order to find a solution.”
  • A journalist reporting on a social issue might say, “Through interviews and research, I aim to get to the heart of this problem and raise awareness.”

29. Get to the gist of it

To summarize or convey the main idea or essential information of a topic or conversation. This phrase is often used when someone wants to provide a brief overview without going into all the details.

  • For instance, in a meeting, someone might say, “Can you get to the gist of your presentation? We’re short on time.”
  • In a book review, a reader might comment, “The author does a great job of getting to the gist of complex scientific concepts.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Can you give me the gist of the story you just read?”

30. Get to the point

To be direct or concise in communication, getting straight to the main idea or purpose without unnecessary details or digressions. This phrase is often used to encourage someone to stop beating around the bush and express their main point.

  • For example, in a conversation, one person might say, “Please get to the point. I don’t have much time.”
  • In a business presentation, a speaker might say, “Let’s get to the point and discuss the key findings.”
  • A friend might jokingly tell another, “Stop rambling and get to the point already!”

31. Get to the meat and potatoes

This phrase is used to encourage someone to focus on the most important aspects or to stop wasting time on unnecessary details.

  • For example, in a meeting, a manager might say, “Let’s get to the meat and potatoes of this presentation.”
  • In a conversation about a book, someone might ask, “Can you get to the meat and potatoes of the story?”
  • When giving advice, a friend might say, “Don’t beat around the bush, just get to the meat and potatoes of the problem.”

32. Dive into it

This phrase is used to encourage someone to explore a topic or subject in depth or with enthusiasm.

  • For instance, in a class discussion, a teacher might say, “Let’s dive into the topic of climate change.”
  • In a conversation about a new hobby, someone might say, “I can’t wait to dive into it and learn everything I can.”
  • When discussing a complex issue, a journalist might write, “In order to understand the situation fully, we need to dive into it and examine all the factors.”

33. Elaborate on it

This phrase is used to ask someone to expand on a topic or provide additional information.

  • For example, in a presentation, a listener might ask, “Can you elaborate on the third point?”
  • In a discussion about a news article, someone might say, “I’m not sure I understand, can you elaborate on it?”
  • When giving feedback on a draft, a teacher might write, “This section needs more elaboration, please expand on it.”

34. Flesh it out

This phrase is used to ask someone to develop or expand on an idea, concept, or plan.

  • For instance, in a brainstorming session, a team member might say, “Let’s flesh it out and come up with more specific ideas.”
  • In a conversation about a story, someone might suggest, “The characters need more development, let’s flesh them out.”
  • When reviewing a proposal, a manager might write, “This section is too brief, please flesh it out with more details.”

35. Go through it

This phrase is used to ask someone to carefully examine or discuss a specific topic or document.

  • For example, in a meeting, a supervisor might say, “Let’s go through the agenda for today.”
  • In a conversation about a report, someone might ask, “Can you go through it and explain the key findings?”
  • When reviewing a contract, a lawyer might say, “I need to go through it carefully to ensure there are no hidden clauses.”

36. Talk through it

To talk through something means to explain or discuss it in detail. It involves breaking down complex ideas or concepts into simpler terms.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let’s talk through this math problem step by step.”
  • In a meeting, someone might suggest, “We should talk through the pros and cons of each option before making a decision.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you talk me through how to use this new software?”

37. Run through it

To run through something means to quickly go over or review it. It implies a brief and cursory examination rather than a detailed explanation.

  • For instance, a coach might say, “Let’s run through the plays one more time before the game.”
  • In a presentation, someone might say, “Let’s run through the main points before we wrap up.”
  • A teacher might ask, “Can you run through the steps of the scientific method for the class?”

38. Walk through it

To walk through something means to guide someone through a process or procedure. It involves providing step-by-step instructions or explanations.

  • For example, a trainer might say, “I’ll walk you through the steps of this exercise.”
  • In a software tutorial, the instructor might say, “Let me walk you through how to install the program.”
  • A colleague might ask, “Can you walk me through the new company policy?”

39. Shed light on it

To shed light on something means to provide clarification or understanding. It involves bringing attention to important information or revealing new insights.

  • For instance, a researcher might say, “Our study sheds light on the causes of this disease.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “Can you shed some light on why this decision was made?”
  • A journalist might write, “The new report sheds light on the inner workings of the government.”

40. Unpack it

To unpack something means to analyze or examine it in depth. It involves breaking down complex ideas or issues and exploring the underlying meanings or implications.

  • For example, a professor might say, “Let’s unpack this theory and explore its implications.”
  • In a book review, the critic might write, “The author does a great job of unpacking the themes and symbolism in this novel.”
  • A therapist might ask, “Can we unpack the emotions behind your reaction to this situation?”

41. Get the lowdown on it

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to provide all the necessary information or details about a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, “Hey, can you get the lowdown on that new project for me?”
  • In a conversation about a recent event, someone might say, “I need to get the lowdown on what happened at the party last night.”
  • A journalist might ask a source, “Can you give me the lowdown on the upcoming election?”

42. Tell it like it is

This slang phrase is used to encourage someone to speak truthfully and without sugarcoating the facts.

  • For instance, if someone is being evasive in a conversation, you might say, “Just tell it like it is, don’t beat around the bush.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “We need politicians who are willing to tell it like it is.”
  • A friend might ask for advice, saying, “I need you to tell it like it is, no matter how harsh.”

43. Get the scoop on it

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to gather or provide the most recent and relevant information or news about a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, “Can you get the scoop on the new restaurant opening?”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity scandal, someone might say, “I need to get the scoop on what happened at the party.”
  • A journalist might ask a source, “Can you give me the scoop on the upcoming product launch?”

44. Get the skinny on it

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to gather or provide the inside information or details about a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, “Can you get the skinny on the new employee?”
  • In a conversation about a business deal, someone might say, “I need to get the skinny on the negotiations.”
  • A detective might ask a witness, “Can you give me the skinny on what happened at the crime scene?”

45. Break it all down for me

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to explain a complex or confusing topic in a simplified and understandable way.

  • For example, “I don’t understand this concept, can you break it all down for me?”
  • In a discussion about a scientific theory, someone might say, “Can you break it all down for me, I’m having trouble grasping the concept.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Can you break it all down for the class, so everyone can understand?”

46. Give me the rundown on it

This phrase is used to ask for a concise explanation or summary of a topic or situation.

  • For example, if someone is talking about a new movie, you might say, “Can you give me the rundown on it? I haven’t heard anything about it.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might ask, “Before we begin, can you give us the rundown on the project?”
  • If a friend is telling you about their recent vacation, you could say, “Give me the rundown on it. I want to hear all the details!”

47. Get the full story on it

This phrase is used to express the desire to know all the facts or information about a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, if someone mentions a news article, you might say, “I’m interested. Can you get the full story on it?”
  • When discussing a controversial event, someone might say, “I don’t have all the details. I need to get the full story on it before forming an opinion.”
  • If a friend tells you about a rumor, you could respond, “That’s interesting. I’ll try to get the full story on it.”

48. Get the whole picture on it

This phrase is used to express the desire to have a comprehensive understanding or perspective of a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, if someone is discussing a complex issue, you might say, “I want to get the whole picture on it before making any judgments.”
  • When talking about a historical event, someone might say, “To truly understand it, you need to get the whole picture on it.”
  • If a friend is explaining their decision, you could say, “I appreciate your explanation, but I still need to get the whole picture on it.”

49. Get the ins and outs of it

This phrase is used to express the desire to understand all the specific details and intricacies of a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, if someone is explaining a complicated process, you might say, “Can you break it down further? I want to get the ins and outs of it.”
  • When discussing a new technology, someone might say, “I’m still learning about it. I don’t have all the ins and outs of it yet.”
  • If a friend is describing a challenging task, you could respond, “I appreciate the overview, but I need to get the ins and outs of it to fully understand.”
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