Top 44 Slang For Expresses – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing yourself in today’s fast-paced world, having the right slang at your fingertips can make all the difference. Our team at Fluentslang has scoured the internet to bring you a list of the most up-to-date and trendy slang for expresses that will take your communication game to the next level. Get ready to spice up your conversations and stay ahead of the curve with our essential guide to the latest linguistic trends.

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1. Spill the tea

This phrase is often used to encourage someone to share juicy or scandalous information. It originated from the idea of spilling hot tea, which represents revealing secrets or gossip.

  • For example, “Come on, spill the tea! What really happened at the party last night?”
  • A friend might say, “I have some tea to spill about that new coworker.”
  • In a celebrity gossip discussion, someone might ask, “Any tea on the latest Hollywood scandal?”

2. Shoot the breeze

This phrase means to have a relaxed and informal conversation about various topics. It implies chatting aimlessly without any specific agenda or purpose.

  • For instance, “Let’s grab a coffee and shoot the breeze for a while.”
  • Two friends might say, “We used to sit on the porch and shoot the breeze for hours.”
  • In a social setting, someone might suggest, “Why don’t we all sit around and shoot the breeze?”

3. Lay it on me

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide all the information or details they have about a particular topic. It implies that the person is ready and willing to listen to whatever the speaker has to say.

  • For example, “I heard you have some insider knowledge. Lay it on me!”
  • A friend might ask, “You seem upset. Do you want to talk about it? Lay it on me.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “We need to make a decision soon. Lay it on me, what are our options?”

4. Let it all hang out

This phrase means to be completely open and honest, without holding back or hiding anything. It encourages people to express themselves freely and authentically.

  • For instance, “This is a safe space, so let it all hang out and share your true feelings.”
  • Two friends might say, “Let’s have a girls’ night and just let it all hang out.”
  • In a therapy session, a therapist might encourage the client, “This is a judgment-free zone. Feel free to let it all hang out and be yourself.”

5. Give me the lowdown

This phrase means to give a concise and summarized version of the most important information or details about a particular topic. It implies asking for the key points or essential facts.

  • For example, “I’m new to this topic. Can you give me the lowdown?”
  • A colleague might say, “Before the meeting, give me the lowdown on the latest updates.”
  • In a travel discussion, someone might ask, “I’m planning a trip to Rome. Can you give me the lowdown on the best places to visit?”

6. Spill the beans

This phrase means to disclose or reveal information that was previously unknown or secret. It is often used when someone accidentally or intentionally reveals information that was supposed to be kept private.

  • For example, “She spilled the beans about the surprise party and ruined the surprise.”
  • In a gossip-filled conversation, someone might say, “Come on, spill the beans! What did you hear about them?”
  • A friend might confess, “I can’t keep it a secret any longer, I have to spill the beans about what happened last night.”

7. Drop some knowledge

This phrase means to share or provide information or expertise on a particular subject. It is often used when someone imparts valuable or interesting knowledge to others.

  • For instance, “He always drops some knowledge about history during our conversations.”
  • In a classroom setting, a teacher might encourage students by saying, “Don’t be afraid to drop some knowledge during the discussion.”
  • A podcast host might say, “Our guest today is going to drop some knowledge about entrepreneurship and success.”

8. Let the cat out of the bag

This phrase means to reveal a secret or surprise that was meant to be kept hidden. It is often used when someone unintentionally or purposefully discloses information that was supposed to remain unknown.

  • For example, “She let the cat out of the bag and told everyone about the surprise party.”
  • In a suspenseful movie, a character might say, “Don’t let the cat out of the bag, or our plan will be ruined.”
  • A friend might confess, “I can’t keep it a secret any longer, I have to let the cat out of the bag and tell you what really happened.”

9. Keep it real

This phrase means to be honest, genuine, and authentic in one’s words and actions. It is often used to encourage someone to be true to themselves and not pretend or put on a facade.

  • For instance, “I appreciate how he always keeps it real and speaks his mind.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “It’s important to keep it real and communicate openly with your partner.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage the audience by saying, “Remember to keep it real and stay true to your values and dreams.”

10. Put it out there

This phrase means to express or share something openly and honestly. It is often used when someone wants to communicate their thoughts, feelings, or ideas without holding back.

  • For example, “She put it out there and shared her true feelings about the situation.”
  • In a team meeting, a colleague might say, “Let’s put it out there and discuss any challenges we’re facing.”
  • A friend might encourage you by saying, “Don’t be afraid to put it out there and share your creative ideas.”

11. Share the deets

This phrase is used to request or provide more information or specific details about something.

  • For example, if someone asks, “What happened at the party last night?” you might respond, “Sure, let me share the deets with you.”
  • In a conversation about a new movie, one person might say, “Have you seen it? Share the deets!”
  • A friend might ask, “How was your date? Share the deets, girl!”

12. Lay your cards on the table

This phrase is used to encourage someone to be honest and open about their thoughts, feelings, or intentions.

  • For instance, if two friends are having a serious conversation, one might say, “It’s time to lay your cards on the table and tell me how you really feel.”
  • In a business negotiation, one party might say, “Let’s lay our cards on the table and discuss our expectations.”
  • A relationship counselor might advise a couple, “To move forward, you need to lay your cards on the table and communicate openly.”

13. Tell it like it is

This phrase is used to encourage someone to speak honestly and directly, without sugarcoating or hiding the truth.

  • For example, if someone asks for your opinion on a new haircut, you might respond, “I’ll tell it like it is – I don’t think it suits you.”
  • In a political discussion, someone might say, “It’s time for politicians to stop beating around the bush and tell it like it is.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage their audience, “Don’t be afraid to tell it like it is and stand up for what you believe in.”

14. Give me the scoop

This phrase is used to request or obtain the latest or most important information or news about something.

  • For instance, if someone sees you reading a celebrity gossip magazine, they might say, “Give me the scoop – any juicy stories?”
  • In a conversation about a new restaurant, one person might ask, “Have you been there? Give me the scoop!”
  • A journalist might say, “I need to interview some sources and get the scoop on this breaking news story.”

15. Break it down for me

This phrase is used to request or ask for a clear and simplified explanation of something.

  • For example, if someone is explaining a complex math problem, you might ask them, “Can you break it down for me? I’m having trouble understanding.”
  • In a dance class, the instructor might say, “Let’s break it down step by step so everyone can follow.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “If you’re struggling with the concept, don’t be afraid to ask me to break it down for you.”

16. Fill me in

This phrase is used when someone wants to be informed or updated about a certain situation or topic.

  • For example, if someone missed a meeting, they might say, “Can you fill me in on what I missed?”
  • In a group chat, someone might ask, “Can you fill me in on the plan for tonight?”
  • A friend might say, “I haven’t been following the news, can you fill me in on what’s happening?”

17. Let me in on the secret

This phrase is used when someone wants to be included or informed about a secret or private information.

  • For instance, if a group of friends is whispering, someone might say, “Hey, let me in on the secret!”
  • In a mystery novel, a detective might say, “I think it’s time someone let me in on the secret.”
  • A person might ask, “What’s going on? Let me in on the secret!”

18. Clue me in

This phrase is used when someone wants to be given more information or understanding about a particular situation or topic.

  • For example, if someone is confused about a joke, they might say, “Can you clue me in on what that meant?”
  • In a team meeting, someone might ask, “Can you clue me in on the new project we’re starting?”
  • A person might say, “I’m new to this, can you clue me in on how things work around here?”

19. Give me the 411

This phrase is used when someone wants to be given all the relevant or important information about a certain topic.

  • For instance, if someone is planning a trip, they might ask, “Can you give me the 411 on the best places to visit?”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity scandal, someone might say, “I need the 411 on what happened.”
  • A person might ask, “I haven’t been following the news, can you give me the 411 on current events?”

20. Break the news

This phrase is used when someone wants to inform others about significant or surprising news.

  • For example, if someone is about to reveal a secret, they might say, “I need to break the news to you.”
  • In a family gathering, someone might say, “I have some exciting news to break.”
  • A person might say, “I hate to be the one to break the news, but the event has been canceled.”

21. Put me in the loop

This phrase is used to ask someone to keep you informed or updated about a particular situation or topic. It implies that you want to be included in the group of people who are aware of the latest information.

  • For example, if your coworkers are discussing a new project, you might say, “Put me in the loop so I know what’s going on.”
  • If your friends are planning a surprise party, you could ask, “Can you put me in the loop so I can help with the preparations?”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might request, “Please put me in the loop regarding any changes to the schedule.”

22. Share the inside scoop

This phrase is used to ask someone to share confidential or insider information. It implies that you want to know the details that are not publicly known.

  • For instance, if a friend is talking about a celebrity they met, you might say, “Share the inside scoop! What were they really like?”
  • If someone is discussing a new restaurant opening, you could ask, “Do you have the inside scoop on the menu or any special offers?”
  • In a workplace, a colleague might say, “I heard there are going to be some changes in the company. Can you share the inside scoop?”

23. Tell me straight

This phrase is used to ask someone to speak honestly and directly without sugarcoating or hiding any information.

  • For example, if a friend is giving you vague answers about their plans, you might say, “Tell me straight. Are you coming or not?”
  • If someone is giving you feedback, you could ask, “Can you tell me straight what I need to improve?”
  • In a professional setting, a supervisor might say, “I need you to tell me straight if you’re facing any challenges with the project.”

24. Give me the details

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide all the necessary information or specifics about a particular topic.

  • For instance, if a friend tells you about a party, you might say, “Give me the details. When and where is it?”
  • If someone is explaining a new product, you could ask, “Can you give me the details on its features and pricing?”
  • In a work context, a colleague might say, “I need you to give me the details of your findings so I can include them in the report.”

25. Dish the dirt

This phrase is used to ask someone to share gossip or scandalous information about someone or something.

  • For example, if a friend mentions a celebrity scandal, you might say, “Dish the dirt! What happened?”
  • If someone is talking about a coworker’s secret relationship, you could ask, “Can you dish the dirt on who they’re dating?”
  • In a social setting, a person might say, “I heard there’s some drama going on. Please dish the dirt!”

26. Break it down

This phrase is used to ask someone to explain or clarify something in a more simplified or understandable way.

  • For example, if someone is explaining a complex concept, you might say, “Can you break it down for me?”
  • In a dance class, the instructor might say, “Let’s break it down step by step.”
  • If someone is struggling to understand instructions, they might ask, “Can you break it down into smaller parts?”

27. Let me in on it

This phrase is used to express a desire to be included or informed about something that others already know or are involved in.

  • For instance, if people are discussing a secret, you might say, “Come on, let me in on it!”
  • In a group conversation, if someone is sharing a personal story, you might say, “Hey, let me in on the details.”
  • If your friends are planning a surprise party, you might say, “Don’t forget to let me in on it!”

28. Let me know what’s up

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide information or updates about what is happening or what they are currently doing.

  • For example, if you haven’t heard from a friend in a while, you might text them, “Hey, let me know what’s up!”
  • In a work setting, if you’re waiting for a colleague to complete a task, you might ask, “Can you let me know what’s up with that report?”
  • If someone is acting strange, you might say, “You seem off today. Let me know what’s up.”

29. Give me the heads up

This phrase is used to request or ask for advance notice or information about something that is going to happen.

  • For instance, if your friend is planning a surprise visit, you might say, “Hey, give me the heads up before you come over.”
  • In a work setting, if there are changes to a project, you might ask your supervisor, “Can you give me the heads up on any updates?”
  • If someone is about to share important news, you might say, “Before you tell everyone, can you give me the heads up?”

30. Fill me in on the details

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide all the necessary information or updates about a particular situation or event.

  • For example, if you missed a meeting, you might ask a colleague, “Can you fill me in on the details?”
  • In a conversation about a recent trip, you might say, “I heard you went on vacation. Fill me in on the details!”
  • If someone is discussing a new project, you might ask, “Can you fill me in on the details of what needs to be done?”

31. Share the scoop

This phrase is used to ask someone to share the most recent or up-to-date information or news about a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, “Hey, what’s the scoop on the new restaurant opening?”
  • Someone might say, “I don’t have all the details yet, but I can share the scoop with you later.”
  • In a conversation about celebrity gossip, a person might ask, “Do you have the scoop on the latest Hollywood scandal?”

32. Break the story

This term is used when someone is the first to report or reveal a news story or information to the public.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “I want to break the story about the corruption scandal.”
  • In a discussion about journalism, someone might mention, “Being the first to break a story is crucial in today’s fast-paced news industry.”
  • A news anchor might say, “We have a reporter on the ground who will break the story as it unfolds.”

33. Spill the juice

This phrase is used to ask someone to share juicy gossip or secrets, often about other people or interesting events.

  • For example, “Come on, spill the juice about what happened at the party last night!”
  • A friend might say, “I can’t spill all the juice, but let’s just say it was a wild night.”
  • In a conversation about celebrity scandals, someone might ask, “Have you heard any juicy gossip about the actors on that TV show?”

34. Clue me into the situation

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide information or give details about a particular situation or event.

  • For instance, “I’m a bit lost, can you clue me into the situation?”
  • A colleague might say, “I’ll clue you into the situation before the meeting so you’re up to speed.”
  • In a discussion about a complex problem, someone might ask, “Can you clue me into the background of this issue?”

35. Share the 411

This phrase is used to ask someone to share the latest or most important information or details about a particular topic.

  • For example, “Hey, can you share the 411 on the upcoming event?”
  • A friend might say, “I have all the 411 about the new restaurant opening.”
  • In a conversation about a TV show, someone might ask, “Do you have the 411 on the new season’s plot twists?”

36. Give me the inside track

This phrase is used to request privileged or inside information about a certain topic or situation.

  • For example, someone might say, “Hey, can you give me the inside track on the new product launch?”
  • In a conversation about upcoming events, a person might ask, “Do you have the inside track on who’s performing at the concert?”
  • A journalist might request, “Could you give me the inside track on the upcoming scandal?”

37. Keep me in the loop

This expression is used to request that someone keeps you informed or updated on a particular matter.

  • For instance, a colleague might say, “Please keep me in the loop about any changes to the project timeline.”
  • In a group chat, someone might ask, “Can you keep me in the loop about the party plans?”
  • A friend might request, “Keep me in the loop if you hear any news about the job opening.”

38. Give me the rundown

This phrase is used to ask for a comprehensive summary or detailed explanation of a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, someone might say, “Can you give me the rundown on the new company policies?”
  • In a conversation about a recent trip, a person might ask, “Could you give me the rundown of your itinerary?”
  • A student might request, “Can you give me the rundown on the upcoming exam?”

39. Break it to me gently

This expression is used to request that someone delivers bad news or sensitive information in a compassionate or considerate way.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I appreciate your honesty, but could you break it to me gently?”
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, a person might ask, “Can you break the news to her gently?”
  • A friend might request, “When you tell me the truth, please break it to me gently.”

40. Spill your guts

This phrase is used to encourage someone to confess or reveal everything they know or feel about a certain topic.

  • For example, someone might say, “Come on, spill your guts! What do you really think about the new boss?”
  • In a conversation about a secret, a person might ask, “Are you ready to spill your guts about what happened last night?”
  • A detective might interrogate a suspect, saying, “We know you’re hiding something. It’s time to spill your guts.”

41. Let me know the deal

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide information or updates about a situation or topic. It implies a desire to be informed about the details or specifics of a particular situation.

  • For example, if someone is discussing a new job opportunity, they might say, “Let me know the deal – what are the salary and benefits?”
  • In a conversation about plans for the weekend, someone might ask, “Let me know the deal – are we going out or staying in?”
  • If a friend is talking about a disagreement with their partner, you could say, “Let me know the deal – what happened and how are you feeling about it?”

42. Give me the full story

This phrase is used to request all the details or information about a particular situation or event. It implies a desire to hear the complete and comprehensive account of what happened.

  • For instance, if someone mentions they had a memorable vacation, you might say, “Give me the full story – where did you go, what did you do, and how was it?”
  • In a discussion about a news article, you could ask, “Give me the full story – what are the key points and any additional context?”
  • If a coworker mentions a funny incident at work, you might say, “Give me the full story – I want to hear all the details and anecdotes.”

43. Share the whole truth

This phrase is used to request complete honesty and transparency. It implies a desire to hear the unfiltered and unvarnished truth, even if it includes difficult or uncomfortable information.

  • For example, if a friend is hesitant to share something, you might say, “Share the whole truth – I promise I won’t judge you.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial topic, you could say, “Share the whole truth – I want to understand all perspectives, even if they challenge my own.”
  • If someone is recounting an experience but leaving out certain details, you could ask, “Share the whole truth – what else happened that you’re not mentioning?”

44. Break the news to me

This phrase is used to ask someone to deliver important or significant news. It implies a request to be informed about something that may have an impact on the listener.

  • For instance, if someone has been waiting for medical test results, they might say, “Break the news to me – what did the doctor say?”
  • In a conversation about a major change at work, you could ask, “Break the news to me – how will this affect our team?”
  • If a friend has been keeping a secret and finally decides to share it, you might say, “Break the news to me – I’m ready to hear it.”
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