Top 75 Slang For Facts – Meaning & Usage

In a world full of misinformation and fake news, it’s more important than ever to separate fact from fiction. Luckily, we’ve got you covered with our top slang for facts listicle. From “receipts” to “truth bombs,” we’ve gathered the most popular slang terms that are used to emphasize the truth and verify information. Get ready to level up your fact-checking game and become a pro at discerning what’s real and what’s not.

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1. Facts

This term refers to information or statements that are proven to be true or accurate. It is often used to emphasize the reliability or legitimacy of something.

  • For example, “These are the facts of the case, as presented in court.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “Let’s stick to the facts and avoid speculation.”
  • A person might assert, “The facts speak for themselves, and they support my argument.”

2. Straight up

This slang phrase means to speak or present something in a straightforward and honest manner, without any embellishments or exaggerations.

  • For instance, “Let me give it to you straight up – the party was a disaster.”
  • When confessing a mistake, one might say, “I messed up, straight up.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you tell me straight up if you like the new movie?”

3. Word

In slang, “word” is often used to show agreement or affirmation with what someone else has said. It can also be used to express understanding or acknowledgement.

  • For example, if someone says, “That concert was amazing,” another person might respond, “Word, it was incredible!”
  • When someone shares exciting news, another might say, “Word? That’s awesome!”
  • A person might simply say, “Word,” to indicate that they understand or acknowledge what was said.

4. Fact

In slang, “fact” is often used as a way to emphasize the truth or reality of a situation or statement. It is similar to saying “truth” or “for real.”

  • For instance, if someone says, “I can’t believe he did that,” another person might respond, “Fact, it was unbelievable.”
  • When expressing agreement, one might say, “Fact, that’s so true.”
  • A person might exclaim, “Fact, that movie was incredible!”

5. True

In slang, “true” is often used to confirm that something is accurate or correct. It can also be used to express agreement or acknowledgement.

  • For example, if someone says, “That’s the best pizza in town,” another person might respond, “True, it’s delicious!”
  • When someone shares a personal experience, another might say, “True, I’ve been through something similar.”
  • A person might simply say, “True,” to indicate that they agree or acknowledge what was said.

6. Real talk

This phrase is used to emphasize that what is being said is genuine and sincere. It is often used to express a desire for open and honest conversation.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Real talk, we need to address the issues in our relationship.”
  • In a group discussion, a person might start their statement with, “Real talk, we need to acknowledge the challenges we’re facing.”
  • A friend might use this phrase to express concern and offer advice, saying, “Real talk, you need to prioritize your mental health.”

7. No cap

This slang phrase means “no lie” or “no exaggeration.” It is used to emphasize the truthfulness of a statement or claim.

  • For example, someone might say, “No cap, that movie was the best I’ve seen in years.”
  • When sharing a personal experience, a person might say, “No cap, I was scared for my life.”
  • A friend might use this phrase to reassure someone, saying, “No cap, you’re the most talented person I know.”

8. Deadass

This slang term is used to express seriousness or sincerity. It can also be used to indicate that someone is not joking or playing around.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I deadass can’t believe you did that.”
  • When expressing surprise, a person might say, “Deadass? That’s crazy!”
  • A friend might use this term to convey their genuine concern, saying, “Deadass, you need to take care of yourself.”

9. On God

This phrase is used to emphasize the truthfulness or seriousness of a statement. It is often used in situations where someone is making a promise or asserting the truth of something.

  • For example, someone might say, “On God, I didn’t steal your money.”
  • When expressing frustration, a person might say, “On God, I’m so done with this situation.”
  • A friend might use this phrase to show support and loyalty, saying, “On God, I’ll always have your back.”

10. For real

This common slang phrase is used to express agreement or confirmation. It is often used to emphasize that someone is being genuine or sincere.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t believe she said that. For real?”
  • When expressing surprise, a person might say, “For real? That’s amazing!”
  • A friend might use this phrase to show understanding and empathy, saying, “I know it’s tough. For real, I’m here for you.”

11. Legit

This term is used to describe something that is genuine, authentic, or true. It is often used to emphasize the truthfulness or accuracy of a statement or claim.

  • For example, “That news article is legit. I checked multiple sources.”
  • A person might say, “I have a legit reason for being late. My car broke down.”
  • In a conversation, someone might affirm, “I can vouch for him. He’s legit.”

12. 100%

This phrase is used to express complete agreement or certainty. It indicates that something is completely true or accurate.

  • For instance, “I agree with you 100%. That movie was amazing.”
  • A person might say, “I’m 100% sure I locked the door before leaving.”
  • In a discussion, someone might assert, “His answer is 100% correct. I double-checked the calculations.”

13. You ain’t lying

This phrase is used to show agreement with someone’s statement or to confirm that they are speaking the truth. It emphasizes the sincerity and accuracy of their words.

  • For example, “You ain’t lying. That concert was incredible.”
  • A person might say, “You ain’t lying. This food is delicious.”
  • In a conversation, someone might respond, “You ain’t lying. That movie was so funny.”

14. No doubt

This phrase is used to express absolute certainty or agreement. It indicates that there is no question or hesitation about the truth or accuracy of something.

  • For instance, “No doubt, she is the best singer in the competition.”
  • A person might say, “No doubt, he will succeed in his career.”
  • In a discussion, someone might assert, “No doubt, the team will win the championship.”

15. Absolutely

This word is used to show complete agreement or affirmation. It indicates strong certainty or approval of a statement or claim.

  • For example, “Absolutely, I would love to join you for dinner.”
  • A person might say, “Absolutely, that idea is brilliant.”
  • In a conversation, someone might respond, “Absolutely, I support your decision.”

16. Undeniable

Something that is unquestionably true or cannot be disputed.

  • For example, “The evidence against him is undeniable.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “The facts speak for themselves. It’s undeniable.”
  • A person might assert, “The impact of climate change on our planet is undeniable.”

17. Without a question

Used to emphasize that something is absolutely true or certain.

  • For instance, “He is without a question the best player on the team.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “Without a question, the economy is booming.”
  • A person might confidently state, “Her talent is without a question.”

18. Hands down

Used to indicate that something is the best or most superior option without any competition.

  • For example, “She is hands down the most talented singer in the competition.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “Hands down, this is the best solution.”
  • A person might assert, “Hands down, this is the funniest movie I’ve ever seen.”

19. Bet

Used to show agreement or confirmation of something.

  • For instance, “You want to go get pizza for dinner? Bet!”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I’ll be there at 8 pm. Bet?”
  • A person might reply, “Bet! See you then.”

20. You ain’t wrong

Used to agree with someone or acknowledge that they are correct.

  • For example, “That movie was amazing. You ain’t wrong!”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “The weather is terrible today. You ain’t wrong.”
  • A person might respond, “You ain’t wrong. It’s freezing outside.”

21. Without question

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is unquestionably true or accurate. It is often used to express certainty or confidence in a statement.

  • For example, “Without question, she is the most talented singer in the competition.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “Without question, he is the best player on the team.”
  • Someone might assert, “Without question, the evidence supports my argument.”

22. Incontestable

This word is used to describe something that cannot be disputed or argued against. It implies that the fact or statement is unquestionably true.

  • For instance, “The scientific evidence is incontestable – climate change is real.”
  • A lawyer might argue, “The defendant’s guilt is incontestable based on the DNA evidence.”
  • A historian might state, “The incontestable fact is that the battle took place on this date.”

23. Gospel

This term is used to describe information or facts that are considered to be the ultimate truth or authority. It suggests that the information is reliable and should be trusted without question.

  • For example, “According to him, that story is the gospel truth.”
  • A religious person might say, “The Bible is the gospel for Christians.”
  • Someone might assert, “You can take his word as gospel – he never lies.”

24. Straight facts

This phrase is used to emphasize that the information being presented is accurate, reliable, and based on facts. It implies that there is no exaggeration or falsehood involved.

  • For instance, “Let me give you the straight facts about the situation.”
  • A journalist might say, “I’m here to report the straight facts, no bias involved.”
  • Someone might assert, “Don’t listen to the rumors, I’ll give you the straight facts.”

25. Cold hard facts

This phrase is used to describe facts or information that are undeniable, objective, and based on evidence. It suggests that the facts are solid and cannot be disputed.

  • For example, “He presented the cold hard facts to support his argument.”
  • A scientist might state, “The cold hard facts clearly show that climate change is occurring.”
  • Someone might assert, “I don’t care about opinions, give me the cold hard facts.”

26. True dat

This phrase is used to express agreement or confirmation with a statement or fact. It emphasizes that the information being discussed is indeed true.

  • For example, if someone says, “The sky is blue,” another person might respond, “True dat!”
  • In a conversation about a popular TV show, someone might say, “The last episode was amazing,” and another person could reply, “True dat, it had me on the edge of my seat.”
  • When discussing a well-known fact, someone might say, “The Earth revolves around the sun,” and another person might simply respond, “True dat.”

27. On point

This phrase is used to describe something that is accurate, correct, or relevant to the topic being discussed. It implies that the statement or information is in alignment with the truth.

  • For instance, if someone makes a valid argument, another person might say, “Your point is on point.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might compliment another person’s outfit by saying, “Your style is always on point.”
  • When discussing a well-executed plan or strategy, someone might say, “The team’s execution was on point.”

28. Fax

This slang term is used as a shorthand way of saying “fact.” It is often used to emphasize agreement with or confirmation of a statement or fact.

  • For example, if someone says, “The party was wild last night,” another person might respond, “Fax!”
  • In a conversation about a popular trend, someone might say, “That hairstyle is in right now,” and another person could reply, “Fax, I’ve been seeing it everywhere.”
  • When discussing a well-known fact, someone might say, “The Earth is round,” and another person might simply respond, “Fax.”

29. Solid

This word is used to describe something that is reliable, trustworthy, or of high quality. It implies that the information or statement being discussed is solid and can be relied upon.

  • For instance, if someone gives good advice, another person might say, “That’s solid advice.”
  • In a conversation about a dependable friend, someone might say, “He’s a solid guy, always there when you need him.”
  • When discussing a well-constructed argument, someone might say, “Your reasoning is solid, I can’t argue with that.”

30. Can’t argue with that

This phrase is used to express agreement or acknowledgment that a statement or fact is undeniable or indisputable. It implies that the information being discussed is so clear or obvious that it cannot be argued against.

  • For example, if someone says, “Chocolate is the best dessert,” another person might respond, “Can’t argue with that.”
  • In a conversation about a well-known historical event, someone might say, “The moon landing was a significant achievement,” and another person could reply, “Can’t argue with that, it changed the course of history.”
  • When discussing an undeniable fact, someone might say, “The sky is blue,” and another person might simply respond, “Can’t argue with that.”

31. Ain’t no lie

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is completely true and cannot be denied or doubted.

  • For example, “She said she saw a UFO last night, and ain’t no lie, I believe her.”
  • In a conversation about a shocking event, someone might say, “Ain’t no lie, that was the craziest thing I’ve ever seen.”
  • When expressing agreement with someone’s statement, a person might respond, “Ain’t no lie, you’re absolutely right.”

32. That’s the truth

This phrase is used to affirm that a statement or fact is completely true and accurate.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t believe how much I spent on groceries this month. That’s the truth.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, a person might say, “People need to understand the importance of recycling. That’s the truth.”
  • When expressing agreement with someone’s statement, a person might simply say, “That’s the truth.”

33. You speak the truth

This phrase is used to acknowledge and affirm that someone is speaking honestly and truthfully.

  • For example, in response to someone sharing a personal experience, a person might say, “You speak the truth. I’ve been through the same thing.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, someone might say, “You speak the truth. It’s not an easy decision to make.”
  • When expressing agreement with someone’s statement, a person might say, “You speak the truth. I couldn’t agree more.”

34. Undeniably

This word is used to emphasize that something is unquestionably true and cannot be disputed or denied.

  • For instance, in a discussion about a talented musician, someone might say, “Her voice is undeniably beautiful.”
  • In a conversation about a scientific discovery, a person might say, “The evidence is undeniably clear.”
  • When expressing agreement with someone’s statement, a person might say, “Undeniably, that is the best solution.”

35. It’s a fact

This phrase is used to assert that something is known to be true and supported by evidence or proof.

  • For example, in a debate, someone might say, “Climate change is real, it’s a fact.”
  • In a conversation about a historical event, a person might say, “The moon landing happened in 1969, it’s a fact.”
  • When expressing agreement with someone’s statement, a person might say, “It’s a fact, you’re absolutely right.”

36. No denying it

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is absolutely true and cannot be disputed or argued against. It is often used to express strong agreement or acknowledgement of a fact.

  • For example, if someone states, “The sun rises in the east,” another person might respond, “No denying it.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, one might say, “Climate change is happening, no denying it.”
  • If someone makes a statement that is clearly true, another person might simply reply, “No denying it.”

37. You’re right

This phrase is used to acknowledge that someone’s statement or opinion is correct. It is a way of agreeing with someone or acknowledging their insight or knowledge.

  • For instance, if someone says, “The movie was really good,” another person might respond, “You’re right.”
  • In a debate or discussion, if someone makes a valid point, another person might say, “You’re right, I hadn’t thought of it that way.”
  • If someone gives an accurate answer to a question, another person might say, “You’re right, that’s the correct answer.”

38. True story

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is true and not made up or exaggerated. It is often used to add credibility to a statement or to express surprise or agreement with a surprising or interesting fact.

  • For example, if someone shares an unusual experience, another person might respond, “True story.”
  • In a conversation where someone reveals a surprising fact, another person might say, “True story, I read about that too.”
  • If someone makes a statement that seems hard to believe but is actually true, another person might simply reply, “True story.”

39. No argument there

This phrase is used to express complete agreement with a statement or opinion. It implies that the speaker has no counterargument or opposing viewpoint.

  • For instance, if someone says, “Chocolate is the best flavor of ice cream,” another person might respond, “No argument there.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, if someone makes a point that is difficult to dispute, another person might say, “No argument there.”
  • If someone expresses an opinion that is widely agreed upon, another person might simply reply, “No argument there.”

40. I can vouch for that

This phrase is used to express personal assurance or confirmation of a statement or fact. It implies that the speaker has firsthand knowledge or experience related to the topic at hand.

  • For example, if someone says, “This restaurant has amazing food,” another person might respond, “I can vouch for that.”
  • In a conversation about a product or service, if someone recommends it based on their own positive experience, another person might say, “I can vouch for that.”
  • If someone makes a statement and another person has witnessed or experienced the same thing, they might say, “I can vouch for that.”

41. You hit the nail on the head

This phrase means that someone has made an accurate or precise statement. It can be used to acknowledge that someone has said something that is undeniably true.

  • For example, if someone makes a suggestion that solves a problem, you might say, “You hit the nail on the head with that idea.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might comment, “I think you really hit the nail on the head with your analysis.”
  • If someone accurately describes a difficult situation, you might say, “You hit the nail on the head with your assessment of the problem.”

42. That’s the real deal

This phrase is used to indicate that something is not fake or counterfeit. It can be used to express certainty or confidence in the authenticity of something.

  • For instance, if someone is selling a rare collectible, you might say, “That’s the real deal, I’ve never seen one in such good condition.”
  • In a discussion about a new product, someone might comment, “I’ve tried it and can confirm, that’s the real deal.”
  • If someone is skeptical about a claim, you might reassure them by saying, “I’ve seen the evidence myself, that’s the real deal.”

43. No question about it

This phrase is used to emphasize certainty or agreement. It indicates that there is no doubt or uncertainty about a particular statement or situation.

  • For example, if someone asks if you’re sure about something, you might respond, “No question about it, I’m absolutely certain.”
  • In a discussion where everyone agrees on a particular point, someone might say, “No question about it, we’re all on the same page.”
  • If someone states a fact that is universally accepted, you might respond, “No question about it, that’s common knowledge.”

44. It’s as true as it gets

This phrase is used to assert that something is completely accurate or factual. It emphasizes that there is no doubt or room for interpretation.

  • For instance, if someone makes a bold claim, you might respond, “It’s as true as it gets, I’ve seen the evidence.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might assert, “I’ve done the research, and it’s as true as it gets.”
  • If someone states a fact that is widely known and accepted, you might say, “There’s no disputing it, it’s as true as it gets.”

45. That’s gospel truth

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is absolutely true and should be believed without question. It compares the truthfulness of a statement to the reliability of religious scripture.

  • For example, if someone shares a personal experience, you might respond, “I believe you, that’s gospel truth.”
  • In a discussion about a historical event, someone might assert, “I’ve studied the evidence, and that’s gospel truth.”
  • If someone states a fact that is widely accepted and unquestionable, you might say, “You can trust me, that’s gospel truth.”

46. No disputing it

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is unquestionably true and cannot be argued or disputed.

  • For example, “The evidence is clear, no disputing it – he committed the crime.”
  • In a heated discussion, one person might assert, “My point is valid, no disputing it.”
  • Another might say, “The facts speak for themselves, no disputing it.”

47. You’re not wrong

This phrase is used to agree with someone’s statement or opinion, indicating that they are correct.

  • For instance, if someone says, “This movie is amazing,” another person might respond, “You’re not wrong.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial topic, one person might acknowledge, “You’re not wrong, it is a complex issue.”
  • Another might say, “You’re not wrong, the weather has been unusually hot lately.”

48. That’s a fact, Jack

This phrase is used to assert that something is undeniably true or certain.

  • For example, if someone says, “The sky is blue,” another person might respond, “That’s a fact, Jack.”
  • In a discussion about historical events, one person might assert, “The battle took place in 1863, that’s a fact, Jack.”
  • Another might say, “That’s a fact, Jack – the Earth orbits around the sun.”

49. You can take that to the bank

This phrase is used to indicate that something is trustworthy and can be relied upon as true or accurate.

  • For instance, if someone gives a guarantee, another person might respond, “You can take that to the bank.”
  • In a conversation about a friend’s reliability, one person might say, “If she promises something, you can take that to the bank.”
  • Another might assert, “The information I provided is accurate, you can take that to the bank.”

50. It’s written in stone

This phrase is used to convey that something is fixed, unchangeable, or indisputable.

  • For example, if someone says, “The deadline is tomorrow,” another person might respond, “It’s written in stone.”
  • In a discussion about rules or regulations, one person might assert, “The policy is clear, it’s written in stone.”
  • Another might say, “The terms of the agreement are non-negotiable, they’re written in stone.”

51. No two ways about it

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is unquestionably true or accurate. It suggests that there is only one possible interpretation or conclusion.

  • For example, “No two ways about it, she’s the best singer in the competition.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “No two ways about it, climate change is real and caused by human activity.”
  • When discussing a clear and obvious fact, a person might assert, “No two ways about it, he cheated on the test.”

52. You’ve got it right

This expression is used to confirm that someone’s understanding or statement is completely accurate or correct. It indicates agreement and affirmation.

  • For instance, if someone correctly answers a question, you might say, “You’ve got it right!”
  • When someone accurately predicts an outcome, you could respond, “You’ve got it right on the money.”
  • In a discussion, if someone summarizes a complex idea perfectly, you might say, “You’ve got it right, that’s exactly what I was trying to say.”

53. It’s the honest truth

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is genuinely true and trustworthy. It suggests that there is no deception or falsehood involved.

  • For example, “It’s the honest truth, I saw her with my own eyes.”
  • When someone shares a surprising fact, you might respond, “It’s the honest truth, I read that too.”
  • In a conversation about personal experiences, someone might say, “It’s the honest truth, I’ve never been to Europe before.”

54. That’s the real McCoy

This expression is used to confirm that something is genuine, original, or of the highest quality. It suggests that there are no imitations or substitutes.

  • For instance, if someone shows you a valuable antique, you might say, “That’s the real McCoy.”
  • When tasting a delicious dish, you could exclaim, “That’s the real McCoy, it’s the best I’ve ever had.”
  • In a discussion about a famous artist, someone might say, “His paintings are the real McCoy, true masterpieces.”

55. No ifs, ands, or buts

This phrase is used to assert that there are no exceptions, excuses, or room for disagreement. It suggests that the statement or decision is final and non-negotiable.

  • For example, “You need to be at the meeting at 9 am, no ifs, ands, or buts.”
  • When setting clear rules, a parent might say, “No ifs, ands, or buts, you’re grounded if you don’t finish your homework.”
  • In a serious conversation, someone might say, “We need to address this issue, no ifs, ands, or buts about it.”

56. You’ve hit the nail on the head

This phrase means that someone has made an accurate statement or identified the truth of a matter. It emphasizes the accuracy and correctness of the statement.

  • For example, if someone says, “The key to success is hard work and perseverance,” another person might respond, “You’ve hit the nail on the head.”
  • In a discussion about solving a problem, someone might say, “If we address the root cause, we can solve the issue.” Another person might reply, “Exactly! You’ve hit the nail on the head.”
  • When discussing a controversial topic, if someone makes a clear and concise argument, someone else might say, “You’ve hit the nail on the head with that point.”

57. That’s the unvarnished truth

This phrase means that something is undeniably true, without any exaggeration or embellishment. It emphasizes the straightforwardness and authenticity of the statement.

  • For instance, if someone says, “The company is struggling financially,” another person might respond, “That’s the unvarnished truth.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, if someone presents undeniable evidence, another person might exclaim, “That’s the unvarnished truth!”
  • When someone shares a personal experience that reveals an uncomfortable truth, someone might respond, “Wow, that’s the unvarnished truth.”

58. No room for debate

This phrase means that a statement or fact is so clear and evident that there is no room for disagreement or debate. It emphasizes the certainty and indisputability of the statement.

  • For example, if someone says, “The Earth is round,” another person might assert, “There’s no room for debate on that.”
  • In a discussion about a widely accepted scientific theory, if someone presents overwhelming evidence, another person might declare, “There’s no room for debate here.”
  • When someone states a universally acknowledged fact, someone might say, “That’s a fact, there’s no room for debate.”

59. You’re spot on

This phrase means that someone’s statement or opinion is completely accurate and correct. It emphasizes the precision and correctness of the statement.

  • For instance, if someone says, “The answer is 42,” another person might respond, “You’re spot on.”
  • In a discussion about a complex problem, if someone provides an insightful solution, another person might say, “You’re spot on with that idea.”
  • When someone accurately predicts an outcome, someone might exclaim, “You’re spot on! That’s exactly what happened.”

60. It’s a proven fact

This phrase means that a statement or fact has been thoroughly tested, researched, and confirmed to be true. It emphasizes the reliability and credibility of the statement.

  • For example, if someone says, “Smoking causes lung cancer,” another person might assert, “It’s a proven fact.”
  • In a discussion about historical events, if someone presents well-documented evidence, another person might state, “It’s a proven fact that this event occurred.”
  • When someone shares a statistic that has been extensively studied and verified, someone might respond, “It’s a proven fact, there’s no denying it.”

61. Straight dope

This phrase is used to indicate that the information being shared is reliable and trustworthy.

  • For example, “Give me the straight dope on what happened at the meeting.”
  • A person might say, “I got the straight dope from a reliable source.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might ask, “Can you provide some straight dope on this issue?”

62. Gospel truth

This phrase is used to emphasize that a statement or fact is absolutely true and should not be doubted.

  • For instance, “She claimed that her story was the gospel truth.”
  • A person might say, “I trust him completely. He always speaks the gospel truth.”
  • In a debate, someone might challenge an opponent by saying, “Prove to me that what you’re saying is the gospel truth.”

63. Factoid

This term refers to a small or trivial piece of information that is presented as a fact but may not be entirely accurate or reliable.

  • For example, “Did you know that the Great Wall of China is visible from space?” This is often cited as a factoid, but it is actually a myth.
  • A person might say, “Here’s a factoid for you: The average person swallows eight spiders in their sleep each year.” However, this is not based on scientific evidence.
  • In a trivia game, a player might challenge their opponent with a factoid like, “True or false: The Eiffel Tower was originally intended to be a temporary structure.”

64. Inside scoop

This phrase is used to describe information that is not widely known or is considered to be confidential or exclusive.

  • For instance, “I have the inside scoop on the upcoming product launch.”
  • A person might say, “I can give you the inside scoop on what really happened at the party.”
  • In a discussion about a celebrity’s personal life, someone might claim to have the inside scoop on their relationships or scandals.
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65. Tidbit

This term refers to a small or interesting piece of information that is often considered to be trivial or insignificant.

  • For example, “Here’s a tidbit of information: The average person spends six months of their life waiting for red lights to turn green.”
  • A person might share a tidbit by saying, “Did you know that honey never spoils? It’s true!”
  • In a conversation about random facts, someone might contribute a tidbit like, “The shortest war in history lasted just 38 minutes.”

66. Lowdown

This term refers to the true or detailed information about a particular situation or topic. It implies having access to facts or knowledge that others may not be aware of.

  • For example, “Give me the lowdown on what happened at the meeting.”
  • In a discussion about a celebrity scandal, someone might say, “I heard from a reliable source that there’s more to the story. Can you give me the lowdown?”
  • A journalist might say, “I’m working on an article and need the lowdown on the company’s financial situation.”

67. T

This slang term is used to express agreement or confirmation of a statement. It is often used in response to someone sharing a fact or expressing an opinion.

  • For instance, if someone says, “The new restaurant in town has amazing food,” another person might respond, “T, I’ve been there and it’s delicious.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial topic, someone might say, “T, I totally agree with you.”
  • A person might comment on a social media post, “T, this is so true!”

68. On the real

This phrase is used to emphasize that what is being said is true or genuine. It indicates that the speaker is being sincere and not exaggerating or joking.

  • For example, “On the real, I think she deserves the promotion. She’s been working hard and producing great results.”
  • In a discussion about a serious topic, someone might say, “On the real, we need to address this issue before it becomes a bigger problem.”
  • A person might say, “On the real, I appreciate your honesty. It’s refreshing to have someone who speaks their mind.”

69. 100

This term is used to express complete agreement or affirmation of a statement. It means that something is entirely true or accurate.

  • For instance, if someone says, “The movie was amazing, 100,” it means they strongly agree and believe the statement to be completely true.
  • In a conversation about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I understand where you’re coming from, but I disagree. 100.”
  • A person might comment on a social media post, “This photo is goals, 100.”

70. Preach

This slang term is used to express agreement or support for a statement that is considered truthful or inspiring. It implies that the speaker strongly agrees with what has been said and believes it should be shared or spread.

  • For example, if someone says, “Love is love, no matter the gender,” another person might respond, “Preach! We should all be accepting and supportive.”
  • In a discussion about social justice, someone might say, “Preach, we need to fight for equality and justice.”
  • A person might comment on a motivational quote, “This is so inspiring, preach!”

71. No BS

This phrase means that something is true or genuine without any exaggeration or deception. It is often used to emphasize the speaker’s honesty or sincerity.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m telling you, this product is amazing, no BS!”
  • In a conversation, one person might assert, “I’ve known him for years, and he’s always been a no BS kind of guy.”
  • Another person might respond to a doubtful statement with, “I’m not lying, no BS, it really happened!”

72. Swear down

This phrase is used to express absolute certainty or truthfulness. It is similar to “I swear” or “I promise” and is often used to emphasize the sincerity of a statement.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I swear down, that’s the best pizza I’ve ever had.”
  • In a conversation, one person might exclaim, “Swear down, I saw a UFO last night!”
  • Another person might respond to a doubtful statement with, “Swear down, I heard it with my own ears!”

73. Facts only

This phrase is used to emphasize that only true and accurate information is being presented or discussed. It is often used to dismiss or reject any false or misleading claims.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m here to give you the facts only, no opinions.”
  • In a debate, one person might assert, “Let’s stick to the facts only and avoid speculation.”
  • Another person might respond to a misleading statement with, “Sorry, but those are alternative facts. We’re sticking to the facts only here.”

74. No question

This phrase means that something is unquestionably true or certain. It is often used to express strong agreement or affirmation.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s the best player on the team, no question about it.”
  • In a discussion, one person might assert, “No question, she’s the most qualified candidate for the job.”
  • Another person might respond to a statement with, “No question, that’s the right way to do it.”

75. You’re spitting facts

This phrase is used to acknowledge and affirm that someone is expressing true and accurate information. It is often used as a compliment or to show agreement with someone’s statement.

  • For example, someone might say, “You’re spitting facts, I completely agree with you.”
  • In a conversation, one person might respond to a truthful statement with, “You’re spitting facts, my friend.”
  • Another person might use this phrase to compliment someone’s knowledge or insight by saying, “Wow, you’re really spitting facts today!”