Top 68 Slang For Fears – Meaning & Usage

Fear not, dear readers, for we have delved into the depths of modern slang to bring you a list that will have you feeling fearless in no time. From spooky phrases to chilling acronyms, our compilation of the top “Slang For Fears” is sure to keep you in the know and ready to conquer any linguistic challenge that comes your way. So buckle up and get ready to explore the world of fears in a whole new light with us!

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1. Jitters

This term refers to a feeling of unease or anxiety, often accompanied by trembling or shaking. It is commonly used to describe pre-performance nerves or general anxiousness.

  • For example, “I always get the jitters before a big presentation.”
  • A person might say, “I have the jitters about going on a blind date.”
  • Another might admit, “The jitters always kick in before a job interview.”

2. Creeps

The creeps is a slang term used to describe a feeling of unease or discomfort, often caused by something eerie or creepy. It can also refer to a person or situation that gives off a creepy vibe.

  • For instance, “That abandoned house gives me the creeps.”
  • A person might say, “He gives me the creeps with his constant staring.”
  • Another might warn, “Be careful, that neighborhood gives me the creeps at night.”

3. Heebee-jeebies

Heebee-jeebies is a slang term used to describe a strong feeling of unease or discomfort, often accompanied by a shiver or goosebumps. It is commonly used to express a deep sense of fear or creepiness.

  • For example, “That horror movie gave me the heebee-jeebies.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t go into that old haunted house, it gives me the heebee-jeebies.”
  • Another might admit, “The thought of spiders gives me the heebee-jeebies.”

4. Willies

The willies is a slang term used to describe a feeling of nervousness, unease, or discomfort. It is often used to describe a situation or person that gives someone an unsettling feeling.

  • For instance, “That dark alley gives me the willies.”
  • A person might say, “He gives me the willies with his strange behavior.”
  • Another might admit, “I always get the willies when I have to speak in public.”

5. Spooked

Spooked is a slang term used to describe a feeling of being scared or startled. It is often used to describe a sudden fear or a feeling of being watched.

  • For example, “I got spooked when I heard a strange noise in the middle of the night.”
  • A person might say, “The dark forest always makes me feel spooked.”
  • Another might admit, “I’m easily spooked by horror movies.”

6. Fright

A sudden intense feeling of fear or terror. “Fright” is often used to describe a strong reaction to something scary or shocking.

  • For example, “The horror movie gave me such a fright that I couldn’t sleep.”
  • A person might say, “I got such a fright when I saw a spider crawling on my arm.”
  • Another might exclaim, “The loud crash outside gave me a fright!”

7. Goosebumps

The involuntary raising of the hairs on the skin, typically caused by cold, fear, or excitement. “Goosebumps” refers to the small bumps that appear on the skin when this reaction occurs.

  • For instance, “The creepy story gave me goosebumps.”
  • A person might say, “I always get goosebumps when I hear a scary noise.”
  • Another might exclaim, “The unexpected jump scare gave me goosebumps!”

8. Shivers

A trembling or quivering movement of the body, typically caused by fear, cold, or excitement. “Shivers” describes the physical sensation of shaking or shivering in response to fear.

  • For example, “The ghost story sent shivers down my spine.”
  • A person might say, “The thought of going on stage gives me shivers.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I can’t watch horror movies because they give me shivers!”

9. Panic

A sudden overwhelming feeling of fear or anxiety, often accompanied by a sense of impending doom. “Panic” describes a state of extreme distress or terror.

  • For instance, “I felt panic when I realized I was lost in the woods.”
  • A person might say, “The loud noise caused a panic among the crowd.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I experienced panic when I saw a snake in my house!”

10. Dread

A deep sense of fear or apprehension about something that is going to happen. “Dread” refers to the anticipation of a negative or unpleasant event.

  • For example, “I have a sense of dread about the upcoming exam.”
  • A person might say, “I always feel a sense of dread before going to the dentist.”
  • Another might exclaim, “The ominous music in the movie created a feeling of dread!”

11. Petrified

To be extremely scared or frightened. “Petrified” is a more intense form of fear, often implying a feeling of being frozen or unable to move due to fear.

  • For example, a person might say, “I was petrified when I saw a spider crawling on me.”
  • In a horror movie review, someone might write, “The film had me petrified from start to finish.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was petrified when I had to give a presentation in front of a large audience.”

12. Horrified

To be shocked or disgusted by something. “Horrified” implies a feeling of extreme fear or disgust, often in response to something disturbing or horrifying.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I was horrified when I saw the aftermath of the accident.”
  • In a news article, a journalist might write, “Witnesses were horrified by the scene of the crime.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was horrified to discover a mouse in my kitchen.”

13. Tremors

To experience involuntary shaking or trembling, often as a result of fear or anxiety. “Tremors” can also refer to the physical manifestation of fear or nervousness.

  • For example, a person might say, “I felt tremors in my hands before giving a speech.”
  • In a suspenseful movie scene, a character might have visible tremors as they face their fear.
  • A person describing a frightening experience might say, “I couldn’t control the tremors that ran through my body.”

14. Uneasy

To feel uncomfortable or anxious, often due to a sense of impending danger or unease. “Uneasy” describes a state of mind characterized by a lack of peace or calmness.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I felt uneasy walking alone at night.”
  • In a discussion about a suspicious situation, someone might say, “The strange behavior of my neighbor made me feel uneasy.”
  • A person describing a worrisome event might say, “I had an uneasy feeling in the pit of my stomach.”

15. Shooketh

A slang term derived from “shook” to describe a state of extreme surprise or astonishment. “Shooketh” is an exaggerated form of being shocked or taken aback.

  • For example, a person might say, “I was shooketh when I found out I won the lottery.”
  • In a viral video reaction, someone might exclaim, “I am shooketh by this unexpected twist!”
  • A person sharing a surprising news story might say, “Prepare to be shooketh by this unbelievable headline!”

16. Panicky

When someone is panicky, they are experiencing a high level of anxiety or fear. It is a state of extreme nervousness or agitation.

  • For example, “She felt panicky when she realized she had left her phone at home.”
  • A person might say, “I always get panicky before a big presentation.”
  • In a stressful situation, someone might feel panicky and say, “I can’t handle this, I’m panicking!”

17. Heebie-jeebies

When someone has the heebie-jeebies, they feel a sense of discomfort or unease. It is often described as a creepy or eerie feeling.

  • For instance, “Walking through the abandoned house gave me the heebie-jeebies.”
  • A person might say, “That horror movie gave me the heebie-jeebies.”
  • When someone encounters something unsettling, they might exclaim, “It gives me the heebie-jeebies!”

18. Panic attack

A panic attack is a sudden and intense episode of fear or anxiety. It is characterized by symptoms such as shortness of breath, rapid heartbeat, and a sense of impending doom.

  • For example, “She had a panic attack in the middle of the crowded mall.”
  • A person might say, “I experienced a panic attack during my flight.”
  • When someone is describing their panic attack, they might say, “I felt like I was going to die during the panic attack!”

19. Frightened

When someone is frightened, they are feeling afraid or scared. It is a general term to describe a state of fear or apprehension.

  • For instance, “The loud noise frightened the child.”
  • A person might say, “I’m frightened of spiders.”
  • When someone encounters a scary situation, they might exclaim, “I’m so frightened right now!”

20. Nervous wreck

A nervous wreck is someone who is extremely anxious or nervous. It is a colloquial term to describe someone who is in a state of emotional distress or agitation.

  • For example, “She was a nervous wreck before her job interview.”
  • A person might say, “I’m a nervous wreck whenever I have to speak in public.”
  • When someone is overwhelmed with anxiety, they might describe themselves as a “complete nervous wreck.”

21. Chicken

This slang term is used to describe someone who is easily scared or lacks courage. It can also be used to refer to someone who is afraid to take risks or confront difficult situations.

  • For example, “Don’t be such a chicken, just try it!”
  • In a discussion about facing fears, someone might say, “I used to be a chicken, but now I’m learning to be brave.”
  • A person might jokingly call themselves a chicken after being scared by a horror movie, saying, “I’m such a chicken, I couldn’t even watch the whole thing!”

22. Shook up

This slang term is used to describe someone who is feeling unsettled, anxious, or frightened. It can also be used to describe the feeling of being shocked or surprised.

  • For instance, “I was so shook up after that car accident.”
  • In a conversation about a scary experience, someone might say, “I was really shook up when I saw that ghost.”
  • A person might use this term to describe their nerves before a big presentation, saying, “I’m feeling really shook up about speaking in front of a large audience.”

23. Fright night

This slang term is used to describe a night or event that is filled with fear, horror, or intense fright. It is often associated with Halloween or horror-themed activities.

  • For example, “We went to a haunted house for a fright night.”
  • In a discussion about favorite horror movies, someone might say, “Fright night is the perfect time to watch scary films.”
  • A person might invite their friends to a fright night party, saying, “Come over for a fright night marathon of spooky movies and creepy snacks!”

24. Panic mode

This slang term is used to describe a state of extreme fear, anxiety, or panic. It is often used to describe a situation where someone is feeling overwhelmed or unable to cope with a stressful event or circumstance.

  • For instance, “I went into panic mode when I realized I had lost my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about a high-pressure situation, someone might say, “I always go into panic mode before a big exam.”
  • A person might describe their reaction to a sudden emergency, saying, “When I saw the fire, I went into full panic mode and couldn’t think straight.”

25. Freak out

This slang term is used to describe a reaction of losing control or becoming extremely agitated or frightened. It is often used to describe a strong emotional response to a scary or stressful situation.

  • For example, “I totally freaked out when I saw the spider.”
  • In a discussion about phobias, someone might say, “I have a friend who freaks out whenever she sees a snake.”
  • A person might describe their reaction to a jump scare in a movie, saying, “That scene made me freak out and spill my popcorn everywhere!”

26. Chills

This term refers to the physical sensation of shivering or feeling cold, often as a response to fear or unease. It can also describe the feeling of being spooked or creeped out.

  • For example, “That horror movie gave me chills down my spine.”
  • A person might say, “The haunted house was so creepy, it gave me chills.”
  • Another might describe a scary experience, saying, “I walked through the graveyard at night and got chills.”

27. Heart in mouth

This phrase describes a feeling of intense fear or anxiety, often to the point where one feels their heart is in their mouth. It can be used to convey a sense of panic or extreme worry.

  • For instance, “When I saw the car swerve towards me, my heart was in my mouth.”
  • A person might say, “I had my heart in my mouth as I waited for the test results.”
  • Another might describe a terrifying experience, saying, “As I climbed the mountain, my heart was in my mouth the entire time.”

28. Hair-raising

This term describes something that is extremely frightening or terrifying, to the point where it raises one’s hair on end. It can be used to convey a sense of intense fear or horror.

  • For example, “That roller coaster ride was hair-raising!”
  • A person might say, “The horror movie had a hair-raising twist ending.”
  • Another might describe a scary encounter, saying, “I had a hair-raising experience when I saw a ghost.”

29. Creepy

This word is used to describe something that is unsettling, eerie, or causes a feeling of unease. It can refer to a person, place, or thing that elicits a sense of discomfort or fear.

  • For instance, “The old abandoned house gave me a creepy feeling.”
  • A person might say, “That guy gives me the creeps.”
  • Another might describe a spooky story, saying, “I read a creepy book that kept me awake at night.”

30. Shudder

This term refers to the involuntary trembling or shaking of the body, often as a response to fear or disgust. It can also describe the feeling of shivering or quivering in response to something unsettling or creepy.

  • For example, “I shuddered at the thought of going into the dark basement.”
  • A person might say, “The horror movie made me shudder with fear.”
  • Another might describe a chilling moment, saying, “A cold breeze passed through the room, making me shudder.”

31. Shaky

When someone is feeling shaky, they are experiencing a physical or emotional sensation of instability or unease. It can be a result of fear, anxiety, or nervousness.

  • For example, “I was feeling so shaky before my big presentation.”
  • Another example, “Her voice was shaky as she confessed her fears.”
  • A person might say, “I always get shaky when I have to speak in public.”

32. Quaking in one’s boots

This phrase is used to describe someone who is so afraid that they feel their legs shaking or trembling, as if they were wearing boots that were quaking.

  • For instance, “I was quaking in my boots when I heard the thunderstorm approaching.”
  • Another example, “The horror movie had me quaking in my boots.”
  • A person might say, “The thought of giving a speech in front of a large crowd has me quaking in my boots.”

33. Shivers down one’s spine

When someone experiences shivers down their spine, it is typically in response to something scary or unsettling. It is a physical sensation that can occur when someone feels a sudden chill or a shudder.

  • For example, “The ghost story gave me shivers down my spine.”
  • Another example, “The creepy music sent shivers down her spine.”
  • A person might say, “The thought of going into that haunted house gives me shivers down my spine.”

34. Trembling

Trembling is the act of shaking involuntarily, often as a result of fear, nervousness, or cold. It can manifest as a slight quiver or a more pronounced shaking of the body.

  • For instance, “Her hands were trembling as she approached the stage.”
  • Another example, “He couldn’t stop his legs from trembling during the intense scene.”
  • A person might say, “I start trembling whenever I have to confront my biggest fear.”

35. Squeamish

When someone is squeamish, they have a strong aversion or sensitivity to something unpleasant, often resulting in feelings of disgust or nausea. It can be related to fears or phobias.

  • For example, “I’m squeamish around insects, especially spiders.”
  • Another example, “The sight of blood makes her feel squeamish.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t watch horror movies because I’m too squeamish.”

36. Shaky knees

When someone says they have shaky knees, it means they are feeling nervous or scared. The phrase is often used to describe the physical sensation of fear or anxiety.

  • For example, “I was so nervous before my presentation that I had shaky knees.”
  • In a horror movie, a character might say, “My knees were shaking as I walked through the haunted house.”
  • A person discussing stage fright might say, “I always get shaky knees before going on stage.”

37. Heart pounding

When someone’s heart is pounding, it means their heart is beating rapidly and forcefully. This is a common physical response to fear or excitement.

  • For instance, “I could feel my heart pounding in my chest as I watched the horror movie.”
  • A person describing a thrilling experience might say, “My heart was pounding with adrenaline as I rode the roller coaster.”
  • Someone recounting a scary encounter might say, “I could hear my heart pounding in my ears as I walked through the dark alley.”

38. Wobbly

When someone feels wobbly, it means they are unsteady or shaky, often due to fear or weakness. The term can describe both physical and emotional sensations.

  • For example, “After the intense workout, my legs felt wobbly.”
  • A person describing their fear of heights might say, “Whenever I’m up high, my knees go wobbly.”
  • Someone recounting a scary experience might say, “My voice was wobbly as I tried to speak.”

39. Creepy vibes

When someone mentions creepy vibes, they are referring to unsettling or eerie feelings they get from a person or a situation. It implies a sense of discomfort or unease.

  • For instance, “That old house gives me creepy vibes.”
  • A person describing a suspicious individual might say, “I got creepy vibes from him, so I stayed away.”
  • Someone talking about a horror movie might say, “The creepy vibes in that film gave me nightmares.”

40. Frightful

When something is described as frightful, it means it is full of fear or causing fear. The term can be used to describe both situations and emotions.

  • For example, “The dark forest at night was a frightful sight.”
  • A person describing a scary movie might say, “That movie was so frightful, I couldn’t sleep.”
  • Someone talking about a terrifying experience might say, “It was a frightful moment that I’ll never forget.”

41. Panic station

This phrase is used to describe a state of extreme fear or panic, often in response to a stressful or dangerous situation.

  • For example, “When the fire alarm went off, everyone was in panic station.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in panic station about my upcoming exam.”
  • Another might describe a horror movie as “a panic station-inducing experience.”
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42. Shook to the core

This phrase describes a state of being deeply frightened or disturbed, to the point where one’s core or inner being feels affected.

  • For instance, “The horror movie left me shook to the core.”
  • A person might say, “The news of the accident shook me to the core.”
  • Another might describe a traumatic experience as “something that left me shook to the core.”

43. Petrifying

This word is used to describe something that is extremely terrifying or fear-inducing.

  • For example, “The haunted house was petrifying.”
  • A person might say, “The thought of public speaking is petrifying.”
  • Another might describe a horror movie as “absolutely petrifying.”

44. Shivers up one’s spine

This phrase describes a physical sensation of fear or unease, often felt as a shiver or tingling sensation running up one’s spine.

  • For instance, “The eerie music sent shivers up my spine.”
  • A person might say, “The thought of walking alone at night gives me shivers up my spine.”
  • Another might describe a chilling ghost story as “something that gives you shivers up your spine.”

45. Shudder-inducing

This term is used to describe something that elicits a strong reaction of fear or disgust, often causing one to shudder or feel physically uncomfortable.

  • For example, “The graphic scene in the movie was shudder-inducing.”
  • A person might say, “The sight of spiders is shudder-inducing for me.”
  • Another might describe a disturbing image as “something that is shudder-inducing.”

46. Scare tactics

This term refers to the use of various techniques or strategies to frighten or intimidate someone in order to achieve a desired outcome. “Scare tactics” can include things like threats, manipulation, or psychological tricks.

  • For example, a political campaign might use scare tactics to persuade voters by highlighting potential dangers or negative consequences.
  • A parent might use scare tactics to discipline their child, such as saying, “If you don’t behave, the boogeyman will get you.”
  • In a business context, a competitor might employ scare tactics to intimidate or undermine their rivals.
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47. Shivers down the spine

This phrase describes a physical reaction to fear or intense emotion, often characterized by a tingling or shivering sensation running down one’s back. It is commonly used to express the spine-tingling sensation associated with fear or a creepy experience.

  • For instance, while watching a horror movie, someone might say, “That scene gave me shivers down my spine.”
  • A person recounting a ghost story might say, “I felt shivers down my spine as I walked through the haunted house.”
  • Someone describing a particularly eerie encounter might say, “Just thinking about it gives me shivers down my spine.”

48. Frightened out of one’s wits

This expression is used to describe a state of extreme fear or terror, where someone is so frightened that it affects their ability to think or act rationally. It emphasizes the intensity of the fear experienced.

  • For example, during a roller coaster ride, someone might exclaim, “I was frightened out of my wits the entire time!”
  • A person describing a close encounter with a wild animal might say, “I was so scared, I was frightened out of my wits and froze in place.”
  • Someone describing a nightmare might say, “I woke up from that dream, frightened out of my wits and covered in sweat.”

49. Cold sweat

This phrase refers to the sudden and intense sweating that can occur when someone is feeling anxious, scared, or nervous. It is often used to describe the physical manifestation of fear or anxiety.

  • For instance, before giving a public speech, someone might say, “I was so nervous, I broke out in a cold sweat.”
  • A person describing a near-death experience might say, “I could feel the cold sweat running down my back as I narrowly avoided the accident.”
  • Someone recounting a scary encounter might say, “I was so terrified, I broke out in a cold sweat.”

50. Cower

This verb describes the act of crouching or shrinking back in fear or apprehension. It implies a submissive or defensive response to a perceived threat or danger.

  • For example, during a thunderstorm, a dog might cower under a table or hide in a corner.
  • A person describing a traumatic experience might say, “I cowered in fear as the gunshots rang out.”
  • Someone recounting a scary movie might say, “I couldn’t help but cower behind a pillow during the suspenseful scenes.”

51. Tremble

To shake involuntarily, usually as a result of fear or anxiety.

  • For example, “Her hands trembled as she approached the stage.”
  • In a horror movie, a character might say, “I could feel my body tremble with fear.”
  • A person with stage fright might admit, “I always tremble before I have to speak in public.”

52. Quiver

To shake or tremble slightly, often due to fear or cold.

  • For instance, “The child’s voice quivered as she recounted the scary story.”
  • On a chilly day, someone might say, “I can’t stop my body from quivering.”
  • A person experiencing fear might say, “I felt a quiver go down my spine.”

53. Worrywart

A person who constantly worries or is excessively anxious about various things.

  • For example, “My mom is such a worrywart, she always thinks something bad will happen.”
  • A friend might say, “Don’t be such a worrywart, everything will be fine.”
  • Someone might describe themselves by saying, “I’m a bit of a worrywart, I tend to overthink things.”

54. Anxious

Feeling or showing worry, nervousness, or unease about something with an uncertain outcome.

  • For instance, “He felt anxious before his job interview.”
  • A person might say, “I always get anxious when I have to speak in front of a crowd.”
  • Someone experiencing anxiety might admit, “I’ve been feeling anxious about the upcoming exam.”

55. Timid

Showing a lack of courage or confidence, often due to fear or shyness.

  • For example, “The timid child hid behind their parent when meeting new people.”
  • In a social situation, someone might say, “I tend to be a bit timid around strangers.”
  • A person describing themselves might say, “I’m naturally timid, it takes me a while to warm up to new situations.”

56. Jumpy

This term describes someone who is easily startled or jumpy. It refers to a person who is on edge and reacts quickly to unexpected sounds or movements.

  • For example, “He’s always jumpy, even the slightest noise makes him jump.”
  • A friend might say, “Don’t sneak up on her, she’s really jumpy.”
  • In a horror movie, a character might say, “I’m feeling jumpy, something doesn’t feel right.”

57. Apprehensive

This word describes a feeling of unease or anxiety about something that is going to happen. It refers to being hesitant or cautious due to uncertainty or fear of negative outcomes.

  • For instance, “She was apprehensive about going on the roller coaster because of her fear of heights.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling apprehensive about the job interview tomorrow.”
  • In a conversation about traveling, someone might mention, “I always feel apprehensive before flying.”

58. Dreadful

This term describes something that is extremely bad, unpleasant, or causing fear. It refers to a feeling of dread or intense fear towards something.

  • For example, “The movie was so dreadful, I couldn’t even finish watching it.”
  • A person might say, “I have a dreadful fear of spiders.”
  • In a discussion about haunted houses, someone might mention, “The haunted house was filled with dreadful surprises.”

59. Frightened rabbit

This phrase is used to describe someone who is easily scared or fearful. It refers to a person who is timid and often reacts to fear by freezing or running away.

  • For instance, “He’s like a frightened rabbit whenever there’s a loud noise.”
  • A friend might say, “Don’t scare her, she’s a frightened rabbit.”
  • In a conversation about horror movies, someone might say, “I’m a frightened rabbit when it comes to jump scares.”

60. Shivery

This word describes a feeling of being chilled or having shivers down one’s spine due to fear or unease. It refers to a sensation of discomfort or fear that causes physical reactions.

  • For example, “The eerie music gave me shivery feelings.”
  • A person might say, “Walking alone in the dark woods gives me the shivers.”
  • In a discussion about ghost stories, someone might mention, “I love reading shivery tales before bed.”

61. Shriek

A shriek is a loud and piercing scream, often associated with fear or surprise. It is a sudden and involuntary vocalization that expresses intense fear or shock.

  • For example, when a person sees a spider crawling on their arm, they might let out a shriek.
  • In a horror movie, a character might let out a blood-curdling shriek when they encounter a terrifying creature.
  • If someone startles you by jumping out from behind a door, you might let out a shriek of surprise.
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62. Horror-struck

Being horror-struck means being completely overwhelmed with fear or terror. It describes a state of extreme shock and terror that leaves a person unable to react or move.

  • For instance, if someone witnesses a gruesome accident, they might be horror-struck and unable to look away.
  • In a haunted house, a person might become horror-struck when a scary figure suddenly jumps out at them.
  • If someone tells you a truly horrifying story, you might become horror-struck and unable to sleep.

63. Tremor

A tremor is an involuntary shaking or trembling of the body, often caused by fear or anxiety. It can manifest as a slight quiver or a more pronounced shaking.

  • For example, if someone is extremely nervous before giving a speech, they might experience a tremor in their hands.
  • In a suspenseful movie scene, a character might have a tremor in their voice as they confront their fears.
  • If someone is scared during a thunderstorm, they might feel a tremor throughout their body.

64. Quake

To quake means to shake or tremble violently, often as a result of fear or intense emotion. It describes a more severe and intense shaking than a tremor.

  • For instance, if someone is terrified during an earthquake, they might feel the ground quake beneath them.
  • In a horror story, a character might quake with fear as they encounter a terrifying monster.
  • If someone is scared to the point of trembling, they might say, “I’m quaking in my boots!”

65. Scare

To scare means to cause fear or frighten someone. It refers to the act of making someone feel afraid or startled.

  • For example, if someone jumps out from behind a door to startle their friend, they are trying to scare them.
  • In a horror movie, the goal is to scare the audience and make them jump in their seats.
  • If a person is easily frightened, they might say, “I scare easily.”

66. Dreaded

This term refers to something that is greatly feared or anticipated with apprehension. It describes a feeling of extreme unease or anxiety.

  • For example, “I have to give a presentation tomorrow, and I’m feeling dreaded about it.”
  • A person might say, “I always have a dreaded feeling when I go to the dentist.”
  • Someone might describe a horror movie as “full of dreaded moments that kept me on the edge of my seat.”

67. Alarm

This word is used to describe a feeling of fear or unease, often in response to a potential danger or threat. It can also refer to a warning signal or device.

  • For instance, “The sight of a snake caused alarm in the hikers.”
  • A person might say, “I felt a sense of alarm when I heard a loud noise in the middle of the night.”
  • Someone might describe a situation as “alarming” if it is causing fear or concern.

68. Terror

This term describes a feeling of intense fear or dread. It is often used to describe a state of extreme fear or terror.

  • For example, “The horror movie filled me with terror.”
  • A person might say, “I have a deep-seated terror of spiders.”
  • Someone might describe a nightmare as “a terror-inducing experience.”