Top 68 Slang For Feet – Meaning & Usage

Feet may not be the most glamorous topic of conversation, but when it comes to slangs, they have their own set of quirky terms that are worth exploring. From tootsies to piggies, we’ve gathered a list of the top slang words for feet that will have you chuckling and maybe even rethinking how you refer to your own tootsies. So, kick off your shoes and get ready to dive into this lighthearted and soleful listicle!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Dogs

This slang term for feet comes from the idea that dogs have paws which are similar to human feet. It is a casual and lighthearted way to refer to one’s feet.

  • For example, “My dogs are killing me after walking all day.”
  • A person might say, “I need to rest my tired dogs.”
  • Another might comment, “I just got a new pair of shoes and they’re hurting my dogs.”

2. Hoofs

This slang term for feet is a play on the word “hooves,” which are the hard, horny part of the foot of certain animals, such as horses. It is a more humorous and exaggerated way to refer to one’s feet.

  • For instance, “I danced so much last night, my hoofs are sore.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to put some lotion on my dry hoofs.”
  • Another might comment, “I accidentally stepped on my own hoofs.”

3. Peds

This slang term for feet is a shortened version of the word “pedestrians,” which refers to people who are walking. It is a more casual and urban way to refer to one’s feet.

  • For example, “I’ve been on my peds all day and they’re tired.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to buy some new shoes for my peds.”
  • Another might comment, “I stubbed my peds on the corner of the table.”

4. Tootsies

This slang term for feet is a cute and endearing way to refer to one’s feet. It is often used in a playful or affectionate manner.

  • For instance, “I need to give my tootsies a break and put my feet up.”
  • A person might say, “I love wearing fuzzy socks on my tootsies.”
  • Another might comment, “I painted my tootsies with sparkly nail polish.”

5. Hooves

This slang term for feet is a humorous and exaggerated way to refer to one’s feet. It plays on the image of hooves, which are the hard, horny part of the foot of certain animals, such as horses.

  • For example, “I need to put some lotion on my dry hooves.”
  • Someone might say, “I accidentally stepped on my own hooves.”
  • Another might comment, “I danced so much last night, my hooves are sore.”

6. Flippers

This term refers to feet, often used in a playful or lighthearted manner. It may be used to describe someone’s feet or to refer to one’s own feet.

  • For example, “My flippers are killing me after running that marathon.”
  • A person might say, “I need to get new shoes for my flippers.”
  • In a conversation about dancing, someone might comment, “She’s got some serious moves with those flippers!”

7. Stompers

This slang term is used to describe feet, often implying that the person has heavy or loud footsteps. It can also be used to refer to one’s own feet.

  • For instance, “Watch out for his stompers, you’ll hear him coming from a mile away!”
  • A person might say, “I need to give my stompers a break, they’re tired from all the walking.”
  • In a discussion about dancing, someone might comment, “She’s got some fancy footwork with those stompers!”

8. Kickers

This term is used to refer to feet, often emphasizing their ability to kick or deliver powerful blows. It can also be used to describe one’s own feet.

  • For example, “He’s got some strong kickers, you wouldn’t want to mess with him.”
  • A person might say, “I need to stretch my kickers before the soccer game.”
  • In a conversation about martial arts, someone might comment, “You need to have quick reflexes with those kickers!”

9. Twinkle Toes

This slang term is used to describe feet, often implying that the person is graceful or skilled in dancing. It can also be used to refer to one’s own feet.

  • For instance, “She’s got some fancy footwork with those twinkle toes!”
  • A person might say, “I need to practice my twinkle toes before the dance competition.”
  • In a discussion about ballet, someone might comment, “Twinkle toes are essential for a ballerina!”

10. Plates

This term is used to refer to feet, often comparing them to plates in size or shape. It can also be used to describe one’s own feet.

  • For example, “He’s got some big plates, no wonder he wears size 14 shoes.”
  • A person might say, “I need to soak my plates in warm water after a long day of standing.”
  • In a conversation about foot care, someone might comment, “Taking care of your plates is important for overall foot health.”

11. Piggies

This term is often used to refer to the toes on a person’s feet. It is a playful and affectionate way to talk about feet.

  • For example, a parent might say to their child, “Let’s wiggle your piggies!”
  • A person describing a foot massage might say, “They really worked on my tired piggies.”
  • In a conversation about foot health, someone might ask, “How do you take care of your piggies?”

12. Treads

This slang term refers to the bottom part of a shoe that comes into contact with the ground. It is often used to talk about the condition or quality of the soles.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to get new shoes. The treads on these are worn out.”
  • In a conversation about hiking, someone might recommend a brand with good treads, saying, “Their shoes have excellent traction.”
  • A person might compliment another’s shoes, saying, “Nice treads! Where did you get those?”

13. Happy Feet

This phrase is used to describe a feeling of happiness or contentment in one’s feet. It implies that the person’s feet are comfortable, well-rested, or experiencing pleasure.

  • For example, someone might say, “After a long day of walking, I’m looking forward to happy feet.”
  • A person might describe the feeling of wearing comfortable shoes, saying, “These shoes give me happy feet.”
  • In a discussion about foot massages, someone might say, “A good foot massage can give you happy feet for days.”

14. Ten Toes Down

This phrase is used to express complete dedication or loyalty. It refers to being fully grounded or firmly planted, like having all ten toes firmly on the ground.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m ten toes down for this project. I’m giving it my all.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, a person might say, “I’m ten toes down in this marriage. I’m fully committed.”
  • A person might use the phrase to describe their work ethic, saying, “I’m ten toes down when it comes to my job. I always give 100%.”

15. Kicks

This slang term is used to refer to shoes, particularly stylish or fashionable ones. It is often used in the context of sneaker culture or collecting.

  • For example, a person might say, “Check out my new kicks! They’re the latest release.”
  • In a conversation about shoe brands, someone might say, “I’m a fan of their kicks. They always have unique designs.”
  • A person might compliment another’s shoes, saying, “Nice kicks! Where did you get those?”

16. Paws

This term refers to feet or toes, often used in a playful or affectionate way.

  • For example, “I need to rest my tired paws after a long day of walking.”
  • A pet owner might say, “My dog loves to curl up on my lap and rest his paws.”
  • In a conversation about dancing, someone might mention, “I have two left paws when it comes to salsa.”

17. Tappers

This slang term is used to refer to feet or shoes, especially when tapping or dancing.

  • For instance, “Put on your tappers and let’s hit the dance floor.”
  • A dancer might say, “My tappers make a great sound on the wooden stage.”
  • In a discussion about footwear, someone might ask, “Where can I find a good pair of tappers?”

18. Trotters

This term is used to refer to feet, often in a lighthearted or humorous way.

  • For example, “My trotters are sore after running a marathon.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to give my trotters a break and put my feet up.”
  • In a conversation about foot care, a person might mention, “I use a moisturizer to keep my trotters soft and smooth.”

19. Stompies

This slang term is used to refer to feet, particularly when stomping or walking heavily.

  • For instance, “I accidentally stepped on a lego with my bare stompies.”
  • A person might say, “I love dancing and feeling the beat through my stompies.”
  • In a conversation about footwear, someone might ask, “What kind of shoes are best for protecting my stompies?”

20. Toots

This term is used to refer to feet, often in a playful or affectionate way.

  • For example, “I need to give my toots a break after wearing high heels.”
  • Someone might say, “I love getting a foot massage to pamper my toots.”
  • In a conversation about foot odor, a person might mention, “I always make sure to wash my toots thoroughly.”

21. Clodhoppers

Clodhoppers are large, heavy shoes or boots. The term is often used to describe footwear that is bulky or unattractive.

  • For example, “She stomped around in her clodhoppers, making a lot of noise.”
  • A person might say, “I need to buy some new shoes. These clodhoppers are falling apart.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might comment, “Those clodhoppers may not be stylish, but they’re comfortable.”

22. Paddles

Paddles is a slang term used to describe feet that are particularly large in size. The term implies that the person’s feet are so big that they resemble paddles used for rowing.

  • For instance, “He may not be the fastest runner, but those paddles of his give him great balance.”
  • A person might say, “Finding shoes in my size is always a challenge because I have paddles.”
  • In a humorous context, someone might joke, “With these paddles, I could probably swim faster than I can walk.”

23. Plates of meat

Plates of meat is Cockney rhyming slang for feet. In this slang, the word “plates” rhymes with “feet”.

  • For example, “My plates of meat are killing me after standing all day.”
  • A person might say, “I need to take care of my plates of meat and get a pedicure.”
  • In a conversation about foot health, someone might comment, “It’s important to keep your plates of meat clean and dry to avoid infections.”

24. Footsies

Footsies is a colloquial term used to refer to feet. It is often used in a playful or affectionate manner.

  • For instance, “I love giving my partner footsies massages after a long day.”
  • A person might say, “My footsies are always cold, even in the summer.”
  • In a conversation about foot care, someone might comment, “Regular moisturizing can keep your footsies soft and smooth.”

25. Peepers

Peepers is a slang term used to refer to toes. The term implies that toes are small and resemble the eyes of a small bird.

  • For example, “I stubbed my peepers on the corner of the table and it hurt so much.”
  • A person might say, “I love painting my peepers with different nail polish colors.”
  • In a conversation about foot health, someone might comment, “Don’t forget to clean between your peepers to avoid fungal infections.”

26. Slabs

This term refers to shoes or footwear. It can be used to describe any type of shoe, from sneakers to high heels.

  • For example, “I just bought a new pair of slabs for the party.”
  • A person might say, “I need to find some comfortable slabs for walking.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Check out these stylish slabs I found!”

27. Thumpers

Thumpers is a slang term for boots. It can refer to any type of boot, including work boots, combat boots, or fashionable boots.

  • For instance, “I need to get my thumpers on for this hike.”
  • A person might say, “I love wearing my thumpers with jeans.”
  • Another might comment, “These thumpers are perfect for the winter weather.”

28. Stuffers

Stuffers is a slang term for socks. It is often used to refer to thick or warm socks.

  • For example, “My feet are freezing, I need to put on some stuffers.”
  • A person might say, “I always wear stuffers with my boots.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you have any extra stuffers? I forgot mine.”

29. Barking dogs

Barking dogs is a slang term used to describe tired or sore feet. It implies that the feet are “barking” or causing discomfort.

  • For instance, “I’ve been on my feet all day, and now my dogs are barking.”
  • A person might say, “I need to sit down and rest my barking dogs.”
  • Another might complain, “These new shoes are killing my barking dogs.”

30. Little piggies

Little piggies is a slang term for toes. It is often used in a playful or affectionate manner.

  • For example, “I stubbed my little piggy on the table.”
  • A person might say, “I painted my little piggies with bright nail polish.”
  • Another might comment, “I love wiggling my little piggies in the sand.”

31. Dancers

This term is often used to refer to someone’s feet, particularly when they are used for dancing. It emphasizes the movement and grace of the feet during a dance routine.

  • For example, a dance instructor might say, “Point your tootsies and extend your legs for a beautiful line.”
  • A dancer might talk about their routine, saying, “I have to be careful not to step on my partner’s tootsies during the lift.”
  • In a dance class, a teacher might give feedback, saying, “You need to work on the flexibility of your tootsies to improve your footwork.”

This term is a playful way to refer to feet, likening them to soldiers on the ground. It suggests that the feet are the hardworking foundation of the body.

  • For instance, someone might say, “My peds are sore after a long day of walking.”
  • A person might compliment a friend’s shoes, saying, “Nice kicks! Your peds are ready for action.”
  • In a conversation about foot health, someone might ask, “Any tips for keeping my peds in good shape?”

33. Ground grippers

This term is used to describe feet that have a strong grip on the ground, emphasizing their ability to provide stability and support.

  • For example, a hiker might say, “I need boots with good traction for my ground grippers.”
  • Someone might describe their dance moves, saying, “I use my hoofs to stay grounded and maintain balance.”
  • In a discussion about running shoes, a person might ask, “Which brands have the best support for ground grippers?”

34. Heel and toe

This term refers to the front and back of the foot, specifically the heel and the toe. It is often used to highlight the different parts of the foot.

  • For instance, a podiatrist might explain, “The pressure should be evenly distributed between the heel and toe.”
  • A person might describe a foot massage technique, saying, “I like to focus on the piggies, giving extra attention to the heel and toe.”
  • In a conversation about foot injuries, someone might ask, “Have you ever injured your piggies? I sprained my toe while playing soccer.”

35. Pedal extremities

This term refers to the feet as the extremities of the body, highlighting their position at the end of the legs. It is often used in a playful or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need to pamper my trotters with a pedicure.”
  • Someone might describe their running routine, saying, “I love feeling the wind on my pedal extremities.”
  • In a conversation about foot care, a person might ask, “What are your favorite products for keeping your trotters soft and moisturized?”

36. Step cutters

This term refers to shoes or footwear. It implies that the shoes are capable of cutting or slicing through the ground or surface as you walk.

  • For example, “I need to buy a new pair of step cutters for my hiking trip.”
  • A person might say, “Check out these stylish step cutters I just got.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might comment, “Those step cutters look really trendy.”

37. Toe-jammers

This term refers to shoes that are too tight and squeeze or jam your toes together, causing discomfort or pain.

  • For instance, “I regret buying these toe-jammers; they’re killing my feet.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t wear those shoes, they’re toe-jammers.”
  • In a discussion about shoe comfort, a person might warn, “Be careful, those shoes can turn into toe-jammers after a few hours of walking.”

38. Walkie talkies

This term refers to sneakers or athletic shoes. It suggests that these shoes are suitable for walking or casual activities.

  • For example, “I prefer wearing walkie talkies when I go for a run.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to buy new walkie talkies for my gym workouts.”
  • In a conversation about shoe brands, a person might comment, “Nike makes the best walkie talkies.”

This term refers to flip flops or sandals. It implies that these shoes are lightweight and easy to walk in, similar to using paddles to navigate through water.

  • For instance, “I love wearing foot paddles during the summer.”
  • A person might say, “I forgot my foot paddles at home, now I have to walk barefoot.”
  • In a discussion about beach attire, someone might comment, “Don’t forget to bring your foot paddles to the beach.”

40. Footsie wootsies

This term refers to being barefoot or walking without any shoes on. It conveys a sense of playfulness or affection towards feet.

  • For example, “I enjoy walking around my house in my footsie wootsies.”
  • Someone might say, “I prefer going footsie wootsies on the beach.”
  • In a conversation about comfort, a person might comment, “Sometimes it’s nice to just relax and go footsie wootsies.”

41. Ground pounders

This term refers to feet and emphasizes the action of pounding or stomping on the ground. It is often used to describe someone who walks or runs heavily.

  • For example, “After a long day of hiking, my ground pounders were sore.”
  • In a military context, soldiers might refer to their boots as ground pounders.
  • A fitness instructor might say, “Let’s get those ground pounders moving with some high-intensity exercises!”

42. Heel pounders

Similar to “ground pounders,” this term refers to feet and specifically emphasizes the action of pounding the heels on the ground. It is often used to describe someone who walks with heavy steps or stomps their feet.

  • For instance, “My toddler is a heel pounder and always wakes up the whole house.”
  • In a dance class, the instructor might say, “Try to land softly on the balls of your feet instead of being a heel pounder.”
  • A friend might tease, “You’re such a heel pounder! Can’t you walk quietly?”

43. Pedal pushers

This term refers to feet and is derived from the action of pushing bicycle pedals. It is often used to describe someone who is active or frequently engaged in physical activities.

  • For example, “My pedal pushers are ready for a long bike ride.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might encourage their team by saying, “Let’s show them what we pedal pushers can do!”
  • A fitness enthusiast might say, “I love being a pedal pusher. It’s a great way to stay active and explore the outdoors.”

44. Stomp boxes

This term refers to feet and emphasizes the action of stomping or stepping heavily on the ground. It is often used to describe someone who walks with force or purpose.

  • For instance, “I could hear his stomp boxes approaching from a distance.”
  • In a music context, a guitarist might use a stomp box to create different effects for their instrument.
  • A friend might say, “Watch out for her stomp boxes. She walks with confidence and authority!”

45. Toe ticklers

This term refers to feet and highlights the sensation of tickling, often associated with the toes. It is often used in a playful or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, “I can’t stand it when someone touches my toe ticklers.”
  • In a conversation about foot massages, someone might say, “A good foot rub can really relax the toe ticklers.”
  • A parent might playfully warn their child, “Don’t you dare tickle my toe ticklers or I’ll tickle yours back!”

46. Walkers

This term is a slang for feet, referring to the body part that helps us walk and move around. It is commonly used in a casual or playful manner.

  • For example, “My walkers are killing me after that long hike.”
  • Someone might ask, “Are your walkers sore from all that dancing last night?”
  • A person might compliment someone’s shoes by saying, “Nice kicks to go with those walkers!”

This slang term is used to refer to feet, emphasizing their movement or action. It is a playful and descriptive way to talk about one’s feet.

  • For instance, “I need to give my foot flappers a break after all that running.”
  • Someone might say, “My foot flappers are exhausted from walking around all day.”
  • A person might comment, “I love the feeling of the sand between my foot flappers at the beach.”

48. Footsie tootsies

This slang term combines the words “footsie” and “tootsies” to refer to feet in a playful and affectionate manner. It is often used in a cute or endearing context.

  • For example, “I need to pamper my footsie tootsies with a foot massage.”
  • Someone might say, “I love wearing fuzzy socks on my footsie tootsies during winter.”
  • A person might comment, “My footsie tootsies are in need of a pedicure.”

49. Ground stompers

This slang term refers to feet as body parts that stomp or make contact with the ground while walking or running. It conveys a sense of power or strength.

  • For instance, “I can feel the vibrations in the floor when my ground stompers hit the ground.”
  • Someone might say, “My ground stompers are tired after that intense workout.”
  • A person might comment, “I love the feeling of my ground stompers on the pavement during a morning jog.”

50. Heel stompers

This slang term specifically refers to the heels of the feet, emphasizing their role in stepping or stomping. It is often used in a playful or humorous manner.

  • For example, “Be careful not to step on my heel stompers with those heavy boots.”
  • Someone might say, “I love the sound of my heel stompers on a wooden floor.”
  • A person might comment, “My heel stompers are sore from wearing high heels all night.”

51. Pedal stompers

Pedal stompers is a playful term used to refer to shoes or footwear. It emphasizes the action of stomping or stepping on pedals while riding a bicycle or driving a vehicle.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need to put on my pedal stompers before I go for a bike ride.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might comment, “I love these new pedal stompers I bought, they’re so comfortable.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Make sure you tie your pedal stompers properly before going out to play.”

52. Stomp kickers

Stomp kickers is a slang term used to describe boots. It emphasizes the action of stomping or kicking while wearing these types of footwear.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to put on my stomp kickers before I go out in the rain.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, a person might comment, “I love pairing my stomp kickers with a leather jacket.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you wearing your stomp kickers to the concert tonight?”

53. Toe walkers

Toe walkers is a term used to describe walking or moving around without wearing any shoes or footwear. It highlights the action of walking on the toes instead of the entire foot.

  • For example, someone might say, “I prefer being a toe walker at home, it feels more natural.”
  • In a discussion about foot health, a person might mention, “Toe walkers often have stronger foot muscles.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Why are you toe walking? Put your shoes on.”

54. Walking sticks

Walking sticks is a humorous term used to refer to the legs. It compares the function of legs to that of a walking stick or cane.

  • For instance, someone might say, “My walking sticks are sore after a long hike.”
  • In a conversation about exercise, a person might comment, “I need to work on strengthening my walking sticks.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are your walking sticks ready for a night out on the town?”

Foot kickers is a lighthearted term used to describe sneakers or athletic shoes. It emphasizes the action of kicking or moving the feet while wearing these types of footwear.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to put on my foot kickers before I go for a run.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, a person might comment, “I love pairing my foot kickers with jeans and a t-shirt.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you wearing your foot kickers to the gym today?”

56. Treadies

This slang term refers to footwear, specifically shoes. It is often used in a casual or playful context.

  • For example, “I need to buy some new treadies for the party tonight.”
  • A person might comment on someone’s stylish shoes with, “Nice treadies you got there!”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “I’m all about comfortable treadies, like sneakers.”

57. Steppers

This slang term refers to feet, emphasizing their role in walking or dancing. It is often used in a rhythmic or energetic context.

  • For instance, “Get your steppers ready for the dance battle!”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been on my steppers all day, and my feet are tired.”
  • In a discussion about exercise, someone might mention, “I love going for a run to strengthen my steppers.”

58. Stumps

This slang term refers to legs, particularly when they are perceived as short or stubby. It can be used humorously or affectionately.

  • For example, “I may have stumps for legs, but I can still dance!”
  • A person might jokingly describe themselves as having “tree stumps” for legs.
  • In a conversation about body image, someone might say, “I used to be self-conscious about my stumps, but now I embrace them.”

59. Wheel and axle

This slang term humorously compares feet to a wheel and axle, highlighting their role in movement and transportation. It is often used in a lighthearted or whimsical context.

  • For instance, “Time to put these wheel and axles to work!”
  • A person might say, “I walked so much today, my wheel and axles are tired.”
  • In a playful conversation, someone might ask, “What kind of wheel and axles do you have? Mine are size 10!”

This slang term refers to feet, emphasizing their role in providing support and balance. It can be used in a practical or appreciative context.

  • For example, “I need to get some new foot props for my hiking trip.”
  • A person might say, “I’m grateful for my strong foot props; they’ve carried me through long walks.”
  • In a conversation about footwear, someone might mention, “I prefer shoes with good foot props for added comfort.”

Foot rests are objects or devices that provide support or elevation for the feet while sitting. They are often used to improve comfort and reduce strain on the legs and lower back.

  • For example, “I bought a new office chair with an adjustable foot rest.”
  • A person discussing ergonomic office setups might recommend, “Invest in a good foot rest to maintain proper posture.”
  • Someone might say, “I love using a foot rest while watching TV, it helps me relax.”

Foot stools are low seats or supports for the feet. They are typically used to elevate the feet while sitting, providing additional comfort and support.

  • For instance, “I like to prop my feet up on a foot stool while reading.”
  • A person discussing furniture might say, “This couch comes with a matching foot stool.”
  • Someone might ask, “Does anyone know where I can find a good foot stool for my living room?”

Foot thumpers refers to people who have a habit of tapping their feet rhythmically. This can be a result of nervousness, restlessness, or simply a subconscious habit.

  • For example, “I sat next to a foot thumper on the bus today, it was quite distracting.”
  • A person annoyed by a foot thumper might say, “Could you please stop being a foot thumper, it’s driving me crazy.”
  • Someone might comment, “I’m a foot thumper when I’m anxious, it helps me release nervous energy.”

Foot ticklers are objects or actions that cause ticklish sensations on the feet. This can include things like feathers, fingers, or other objects used to tickle the soles of the feet.

  • For instance, “I can’t stand foot ticklers, they make me laugh uncontrollably.”
  • A person discussing massage techniques might mention, “Some people enjoy foot tickling as part of a foot massage.”
  • Someone might ask, “Has anyone tried using a foot tickler to relax and unwind?”

Foot wagglers refers to people who have a habit of moving their feet back and forth, often in a rhythmic or repetitive motion. This can be a result of restlessness, boredom, or simply a subconscious habit.

  • For example, “I couldn’t concentrate during the meeting because the person next to me was a foot waggler.”
  • A person annoyed by a foot waggler might say, “Could you please stop being a foot waggler, it’s distracting.”
  • Someone might comment, “I’m a foot waggler when I’m bored, it helps me pass the time.”

This term refers to socks, which are worn on the feet to provide warmth, comfort, and protection. “Foot wipers” is a playful slang term for socks.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to put on my foot wipers before I go for a run.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might comment, “These foot wipers are so cozy and cute.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Did you remember to pack your foot wipers for the trip?”

67. Footsie woosies

This slang term refers to toes, which are the digits on the feet. “Footsie woosies” is a lighthearted and affectionate way to refer to toes.

  • For example, a person might say, “I stubbed my footsie woosie on the table leg.”
  • In a conversation about pedicures, someone might say, “I love getting my footsie woosies painted with bright colors.”
  • A parent might playfully tickle their child’s feet and say, “I’m coming for your footsie woosies!”

68. Footy wooties

This slang term refers to baby feet, which are the feet of infants. “Footy wooties” is a cute and endearing way to refer to baby feet.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “Look at those adorable little footy wooties!”
  • In a conversation about baby products, someone might recommend, “These socks are perfect for keeping baby’s footy wooties warm.”
  • A grandparent might gently touch their grandchild’s foot and say, “I love your tiny footy wooties!”
See also  Top 0 Slang For Produced – Meaning & Usage