Top 35 Slang For Filled – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to describing something as packed to the brim, we’ve got you covered. From everyday situations to trendy expressions, our team has rounded up the top slang for filled that will have you nodding in agreement and eager to sprinkle these phrases into your conversations. Stay ahead of the curve and dive into this list to level up your slang game!

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1. Packed

When something is “packed,” it means that it is completely filled or crowded. This term is often used to describe a space or container that has no empty room.

  • For example, “The concert venue was packed with fans eager to see their favorite band.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t fit anything else in my suitcase, it’s packed.”
  • In a crowded subway train, someone might exclaim, “This train is packed, there’s no room to move!”

2. Stuffed

When something is “stuffed,” it means that it is filled to capacity, often to the point of being tightly packed. This term is commonly used to describe objects or food.

  • For instance, “The turkey was stuffed with delicious stuffing for Thanksgiving dinner.”
  • A person might say, “I’m so full, I feel like I’ve been stuffed.”
  • In a discussion about plush toys, someone might mention, “This teddy bear is stuffed with soft filling.”

3. Loaded

When something is “loaded,” it means that it is filled with a large quantity of something. This term is often used to describe a container or a situation where there is an abundance of something.

  • For example, “The truck was loaded with boxes for delivery.”
  • A person might say, “I’m loaded with work, I have so much to do.”
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might mention, “The table was loaded with delicious food and drinks.”

4. Jam-packed

When something is “jam-packed,” it means that it is extremely crowded or filled to capacity. This term emphasizes the level of congestion or fullness.

  • For instance, “The concert was so popular that the venue was jam-packed with fans.”
  • A person might say, “The subway during rush hour is always jam-packed with commuters.”
  • In a discussion about a sale, someone might mention, “The store was jam-packed with shoppers looking for bargains.”

5. Brimming

When something is “brimming,” it means that it is filled to the top or overflowing with a substance. This term often conveys a sense of abundance or fullness.

  • For example, “The cup of coffee was brimming with steaming hot liquid.”
  • A person might say, “I’m so happy, my heart is brimming with joy.”
  • In a conversation about a lake, someone might mention, “The lake was brimming with clear blue water after the rain.”

6. Bursting

This term is used to describe something that is filled to capacity or beyond. It implies a sense of bursting or exploding due to the amount of content or substance.

  • For example, “The suitcase was bursting with clothes.”
  • A person might say, “I ate so much at the buffet, I feel like I’m bursting.”
  • In a conversation about a crowded event, someone might comment, “The venue was bursting with people.”

7. Stuffed to the gills

This phrase is used to emphasize that something or someone is filled to the maximum extent possible. It suggests that there is no more space available.

  • For instance, “After the Thanksgiving feast, I was stuffed to the gills.”
  • A person might say, “The car was stuffed to the gills with luggage for the road trip.”
  • In a discussion about a crowded restaurant, someone might comment, “The place was stuffed to the gills, we had to wait for a table.”

8. Crammed

This term is used to describe something that is filled with little to no space remaining. It implies a sense of being tightly packed or squeezed in.

  • For example, “The closet was crammed with clothes.”
  • A person might say, “The subway during rush hour is always crammed with people.”
  • In a conversation about a small car, someone might comment, “We were all crammed in the backseat.”

9. Overflowing

This word is used to describe something that is filled beyond its normal capacity, often resulting in excess spilling over.

  • For instance, “The sink was overflowing with dirty dishes.”
  • A person might say, “The river is overflowing due to heavy rain.”
  • In a discussion about a crowded party, someone might comment, “The dance floor was overflowing with people.”

10. Saturated

This term is used to describe something that is completely filled or soaked with a substance, often to the point where it cannot absorb any more.

  • For example, “The sponge was saturated with water.”
  • A person might say, “The market is saturated with similar products.”
  • In a conversation about an intense rainfall, someone might comment, “The ground is saturated, causing flooding.”

11. Packed to the brim

When something is “packed to the brim,” it means that it is filled to its maximum capacity, leaving no space for anything else.

  • For example, “The suitcase was packed to the brim with clothes for the trip.”
  • A person might say, “The restaurant was packed to the brim with customers during lunchtime.”
  • Another example could be, “The storage room was packed to the brim with boxes and supplies.”

12. Stuffed to the max

When something is “stuffed to the max,” it means that it is filled to its absolute maximum capacity, often to the point of being overloaded or unable to hold any more.

  • For instance, “After the buffet, I was stuffed to the max with food.”
  • A person might say, “My schedule is stuffed to the max with appointments and meetings.”
  • Another example could be, “The car was stuffed to the max with luggage for the road trip.”

13. Stuffed to the hilt

When something is “stuffed to the hilt,” it means that it is completely filled or loaded to its maximum capacity, often to the point of being unable to hold any more.

  • For example, “The closet was stuffed to the hilt with clothes.”
  • A person might say, “The presentation was stuffed to the hilt with information and data.”
  • Another example could be, “The room was stuffed to the hilt with furniture and decorations.”

14. Stuffed to the gunwales

When something is “stuffed to the gunwales,” it means that it is completely filled or packed to its maximum capacity, often to the point where there is no more room.

  • For instance, “The theater was stuffed to the gunwales with excited moviegoers.”
  • A person might say, “The bus was stuffed to the gunwales with passengers during rush hour.”
  • Another example could be, “The picnic basket was stuffed to the gunwales with delicious food and snacks.”

15. Stuffed to the seams

When something is “stuffed to the seams,” it means that it is completely filled or overflowing, often to the point where it is bursting at the seams.

  • For example, “The suitcase was stuffed to the seams with souvenirs from the trip.”
  • A person might say, “The concert venue was stuffed to the seams with enthusiastic fans.”
  • Another example could be, “The refrigerator was stuffed to the seams with groceries and leftovers.”

16. Stuffed to the rim

When a container or space is filled to its maximum capacity, it is said to be “stuffed to the rim”.

  • For example, “After the Thanksgiving feast, I was stuffed to the rim with food.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t fit anything else in my suitcase, it’s stuffed to the rim!”
  • A person describing a crowded event might say, “The concert venue was stuffed to the rim with excited fans.”

17. Stuffed to the gunnels

When something is filled to the point where it can no longer hold any more, it is “stuffed to the gunnels”.

  • For instance, “The car was stuffed to the gunnels with camping gear.”
  • A person describing a packed room might say, “The party was so crowded, it was stuffed to the gunnels.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “I ate so much at the buffet, I’m stuffed to the gunnels with food!”

18. Stuffed to the limit

When something is filled to its absolute maximum capacity, it is “stuffed to the limit”.

  • For example, “The suitcase was stuffed to the limit with clothes.”
  • A person describing a full schedule might say, “My day is stuffed to the limit with meetings and appointments.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “I can’t eat another bite, I’m stuffed to the limit!”

19. Stuffed to the top

When something is filled up to its highest point, it is “stuffed to the top”.

  • For instance, “The glass was stuffed to the top with ice and soda.”
  • A person describing a packed storage unit might say, “Every box is stuffed to the top.”
  • Someone might say, “I filled the gas tank to the top, so we won’t run out on our road trip.”

20. Bursting at the seams

When something is filled to the absolute maximum and is about to burst or overflow, it is “bursting at the seams”.

  • For example, “The suitcase was bursting at the seams with clothes.”
  • A person describing a crowded event might say, “The stadium was bursting at the seams with excited fans.”
  • Someone might say, “I ate so much at the buffet, I’m bursting at the seams!”

21. Packed to the rafters

This phrase is used to describe a space or venue that is filled to its maximum capacity.

  • For example, “The concert was packed to the rafters with excited fans.”
  • A person describing a busy restaurant might say, “The place was packed to the rafters, we had to wait for a table.”
  • In a sports arena, someone might say, “The stadium was packed to the rafters for the championship game.”

22. Stuffed to the gunwhales

This phrase refers to something that is filled to its maximum capacity, often to the point of overflowing.

  • For instance, “The suitcase was stuffed to the gunwhales with clothes.”
  • A person describing a full storage unit might say, “It’s packed to the gunwhales, there’s barely any space left.”
  • Someone talking about a crowded party might say, “The venue was stuffed to the gunwhales with party-goers.”

23. Stuffed to the gunwalls

This phrase is used to describe something that is filled or packed to its maximum capacity.

  • For example, “The car was stuffed to the gunwalls with luggage.”
  • A person describing a full refrigerator might say, “It’s stuffed to the gunwalls, there’s no room for anything else.”
  • Someone talking about a crowded bus might say, “The bus was stuffed to the gunwalls, it was difficult to find a seat.”

24. Stuffed to the gullet

This phrase refers to something that is filled or stuffed to its maximum capacity, often in reference to food or drink.

  • For instance, “After Thanksgiving dinner, I was stuffed to the gullet.”
  • A person describing a full buffet might say, “The table was stuffed to the gullet with delicious dishes.”
  • Someone talking about a satisfying meal might say, “I ate so much, I’m stuffed to the gullet.”

25. Stuffed to the throat

This phrase is used to describe something that is filled or packed to its maximum capacity.

  • For example, “The theater was stuffed to the throat with eager moviegoers.”
  • A person describing a busy subway might say, “The train was stuffed to the throat, it was difficult to find a seat.”
  • Someone talking about a crowded concert might say, “The venue was stuffed to the throat with excited fans.”

26. Stacked

This term refers to something that is completely filled or packed with items. It implies that there is no more space available.

  • For example, “The shelves were stacked with books from floor to ceiling.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t fit anything else in my suitcase, it’s stacked.”
  • In a crowded restaurant, one might say, “Every table is stacked with customers.”

27. Sardined

This slang term compares a crowded or filled space to a can of sardines, where the fish are tightly packed together. It implies a lack of space or comfort due to overcrowding.

  • For instance, “The subway was so crowded during rush hour, we were sardined in.”
  • A person might say, “The concert was sold out, we were sardined in the venue.”
  • In a packed elevator, someone might comment, “We’re sardined in here, I can barely move.”

28. Piled high

This phrase describes something that is filled or stacked to a high degree. It implies that there is a large quantity or a significant amount of items.

  • For example, “The plates were piled high with food at the buffet.”
  • A person might say, “I have a pile of laundry to do, it’s piled high.”
  • In a storage room, someone might comment, “The boxes are piled high, we need to make more space.”

29. Crammed full

This slang term describes something that is packed or filled tightly in a limited space. It implies that there is no room for anything else.

  • For instance, “The suitcase was crammed full of clothes and shoes.”
  • A person might say, “The car was crammed full of people, we could barely move.”
  • In a small apartment, someone might comment, “My closet is crammed full, I need to declutter.”

30. Packed to the hilt

This phrase describes something that is completely filled or packed to its maximum capacity. It implies that there is no more space available and everything is tightly packed.

  • For example, “The stadium was packed to the hilt for the championship game.”
  • A person might say, “The backpack was packed to the hilt with books and supplies.”
  • In a crowded theater, someone might comment, “The seats are packed to the hilt, there’s not a single empty seat.”

31. Filled to capacity

This phrase is used to describe something that is completely filled or at its maximum capacity.

  • For example, “The stadium was filled to capacity for the concert.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t fit anything else in my suitcase, it’s filled to capacity.”
  • In a restaurant, a server might say, “I’m sorry, but the restaurant is filled to capacity at the moment.”

32. Chock-a-block

This phrase is used to describe something that is packed or filled tightly together.

  • For instance, “The parking lot was chock-a-block with cars.”
  • A person might say, “The train was chock-a-block with commuters during rush hour.”
  • In a crowded room, someone might comment, “The room is chock-a-block, I can barely move.”

33. Full to the top

This phrase is used to describe something that is filled completely, often to the point of overflowing.

  • For example, “The cup was filled to the top with hot coffee.”
  • A person might say, “I filled the gas tank to the top before the long road trip.”
  • In a storage container, someone might say, “The box is full to the top, we can’t fit anything else in it.”

34. Filled to the max

This phrase is used to describe something that is filled completely, often to the maximum extent possible.

  • For instance, “The concert venue was filled to the max with excited fans.”
  • A person might say, “I ate so much at dinner, I’m filled to the max.”
  • In a suitcase, someone might say, “I packed my clothes in tightly, it’s filled to the max.”

35. Packed like sardines

This phrase is used to describe a situation where people or things are packed tightly together, often in a small space.

  • For example, “The subway was packed like sardines during rush hour.”
  • A person might say, “The bus was so crowded, we were packed like sardines.”
  • In a crowded elevator, someone might comment, “We’re packed like sardines in here, it’s so tight.”
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