Top 30 Slang For Find Out – Meaning & Usage

Curious to uncover the latest slang for finding out information? Look no further! Our team has scoured the depths of modern language to bring you a curated list of the most trendy and up-to-date terms for discovering new things. Stay ahead of the curve and dive into this article to level up your slang game and impress your friends with your newfound linguistic prowess!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Dig

To dig means to investigate or research something in order to find out more information or uncover the truth.

  • For example, “I need to dig deeper into this story to find out what really happened.”
  • A detective might say, “I’ll dig into his background to see if he has a criminal record.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you dig up any information on this person?”

2. Scope out

To scope out means to check out or observe something or someone in order to gather information or assess the situation.

  • For instance, “Let’s scope out the new restaurant before we decide to eat there.”
  • Someone might say, “I scoped out the competition and they seem tough.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you scope out the area and see if there are any security cameras?”

3. Get the lowdown

To get the lowdown means to obtain or gather all the necessary information or details about something.

  • For example, “I’ll ask my friend who works there to get the lowdown on the company.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to get the lowdown on this new project before I can make a decision.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you get the lowdown on what happened at the meeting?”

4. Ferret out

To ferret out means to uncover or discover something, especially by persistent investigation or search.

  • For instance, “The detective was able to ferret out the truth behind the crime.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to ferret out the source of this rumor.”
  • A journalist might write, “After months of investigation, the reporter was able to ferret out the corruption within the government.”

5. Suss out

To suss out means to figure out or understand something through observation, investigation, or intuition.

  • For example, “I need to suss out the best way to approach this problem.”
  • Someone might say, “I can usually suss out when someone is lying.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you suss out what’s going on here?”

6. Unearth

To find or uncover something that was previously unknown or hidden. “Unearth” is often used metaphorically to describe the act of finding out information or uncovering a secret.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I was able to unearth some new evidence in the investigation.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I can’t believe what I unearthed while cleaning out my attic!”
  • In a discussion about historical artifacts, someone might mention, “Archaeologists often unearth ancient treasures during their excavations.”

7. Pin down

To find out or identify something with precision or accuracy. “Pin down” is often used to describe the act of figuring out information or getting to the bottom of a situation.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “We need to pin down the exact time of the crime.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you help me pin down the source of this strange smell?”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “We need to pin down the facts before making any conclusions.”

8. Crack

To solve or discover something that was previously unknown or difficult to understand. “Crack” is often used to describe the act of finding out information or solving a problem.

  • For example, a student might say, “I finally cracked the code and understood the math problem.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I can’t believe I cracked the secret recipe for this delicious dish!”
  • In a discussion about encryption, someone might mention, “It takes a skilled hacker to crack a secure password.”

9. Fish out

To find or extract something that was hidden or difficult to locate. “Fish out” is often used metaphorically to describe the act of finding out information or obtaining something that is hard to come by.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “I need to fish out the correct answer from my memory.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you help me fish out that document from the pile of papers?”
  • In a conversation about old photos, someone might say, “I managed to fish out some childhood pictures from the attic.”

10. Nail down

To determine or identify something with precision or accuracy. “Nail down” is often used to describe the act of finding out information or confirming details.

  • For example, a researcher might say, “I need to nail down the exact date of this historical event.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I finally nailed down the answer to that trivia question!”
  • In a discussion about travel plans, someone might mention, “We still need to nail down the final itinerary.”

11. Hunt down

This phrase is often used when someone is determined to find information or find someone. It implies a sense of urgency or determination in the search.

  • For example, “I’m going to hunt down the latest news on that celebrity scandal.”
  • In a detective story, a character might say, “We need to hunt down the criminal before they strike again.”
  • A journalist might say, “I’m going to hunt down the truth behind this conspiracy.”

12. Root out

This phrase implies a thorough search and removal of something undesirable or hidden. It can be used in both literal and metaphorical contexts.

  • For instance, “We need to root out corruption in our government.”
  • In a gardening context, someone might say, “I’m going to root out those pesky weeds.”
  • A detective might say, “We need to root out the mole in our organization.”

13. Figure out

This phrase is used when someone is trying to understand or solve a problem or puzzle. It implies a process of thinking and analyzing.

  • For example, “I need to figure out how to fix this broken computer.”
  • In a mystery novel, a detective might say, “I need to figure out who committed the crime.”
  • A student might say, “I need to figure out the answer to this math problem.”

14. Track down

This phrase is used when someone is determined to find and locate something or someone. It implies a sense of persistence and following a trail.

  • For instance, “I need to track down that missing package.”
  • In a thriller movie, a character might say, “We need to track down the escaped criminal before they harm anyone.”
  • A journalist might say, “I’m going to track down the source of this anonymous tip.”

15. Sniff out

This phrase is often used when someone is able to detect or discover something through their instincts or investigative skills. It implies a sense of keen perception or uncovering hidden information.

  • For example, “The detective was able to sniff out the truth behind the mysterious case.”
  • In a suspense novel, a character might say, “I can sniff out a lie from a mile away.”
  • A dog trainer might say, “My dog can sniff out drugs with incredible accuracy.”

16. Pry out

This slang phrase refers to the act of finding out information by prying or extracting it from someone or something. It implies that the information is not readily available and requires some effort to obtain.

  • For example, “I managed to pry out the truth about what really happened.”
  • A detective might say, “I need to pry out some details from the suspect to solve the case.”
  • A journalist might use this phrase, “I’ll have to pry out the facts to write an accurate article.”

17. Ascertain

This word means to find out or determine something with certainty. It implies a deliberate effort to gather information and reach a definite conclusion.

  • For instance, “I need to ascertain the truth before making a decision.”
  • A scientist might say, “We conducted experiments to ascertain the cause of the phenomenon.”
  • A teacher might ask students, “Can you ascertain the main idea of the passage?”

18. Ferret around

This slang phrase means to search or investigate in order to find out information. It suggests a thorough and persistent effort to uncover something.

  • For example, “I had to ferret around to find the documents I needed.”
  • A journalist might say, “I’ll have to ferret around for more details on this story.”
  • A curious person might ask, “Can you ferret around and see if you can find any information on that topic?”

19. Hunt out

This phrase means to search extensively in order to find out or discover something. It implies a determined and focused effort to uncover information or locate something.

  • For instance, “I had to hunt out the truth amidst all the rumors.”
  • A treasure hunter might say, “I’ll hunt out the hidden treasure with my metal detector.”
  • A researcher might use this phrase, “I need to hunt out more sources to support my argument.”

20. Turn up

This slang phrase means to find out or discover something unexpectedly or by chance. It implies a surprising or unexpected revelation of information or the appearance of something.

  • For example, “I didn’t expect to turn up any leads, but I found some valuable information.”
  • A detective might say, “We need to keep investigating until we turn up some new evidence.”
  • A friend might exclaim, “Guess who turned up at the party last night!”

21. Dope out

To figure out or solve a problem or situation. “Dope out” is a slang term that implies using one’s intelligence or resourcefulness to find a solution.

  • For example, if someone is trying to solve a puzzle, they might say, “I need to dope out the answer.”
  • In a conversation about a complex issue, someone might ask, “Can you dope out a solution to this problem?”
  • A friend might say, “I’m trying to dope out the best way to approach this situation.”

22. Discover

To find something for the first time or uncover something that was previously unknown. “Discover” is a more formal term for finding out information or coming across something new.

  • For instance, a scientist might say, “I discovered a new species of bird.”
  • If someone stumbles upon an interesting fact, they might say, “I just discovered that dolphins sleep with one eye open.”
  • A traveler might share, “I discovered a hidden gem of a restaurant in the city.”

23. Uncover

To reveal or expose something that was hidden or unknown. “Uncover” implies finding out information or bringing something to light.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I uncovered a scandal that was happening within the company.”
  • If someone discovers a secret, they might say, “I uncovered the truth about what really happened.”
  • A detective might say, “Through my investigation, I was able to uncover the identity of the thief.”

24. Get to the bottom of

To thoroughly investigate or explore a situation in order to find out the truth or underlying cause. “Get to the bottom of” implies a deep investigation or inquiry.

  • For instance, if there’s a mystery to be solved, someone might say, “We need to get to the bottom of this.”
  • In a discussion about a complex issue, someone might say, “We need to get to the bottom of what’s really going on.”
  • A detective might say, “I won’t stop until I get to the bottom of this case.”

25. Learn the ropes

To learn or become familiar with a new situation, task, or job. “Learn the ropes” implies gaining knowledge or understanding about how something works or is done.

  • For example, if someone starts a new job, they might say, “I’m still learning the ropes.”
  • If someone is new to a hobby, they might say, “I’m just learning the ropes of photography.”
  • A friend might offer advice, saying, “Let me show you the ropes so you can navigate this new environment.”

26. Delve into

To delve into something means to thoroughly investigate or explore a particular topic or subject. It implies going beyond surface-level information and gaining a deeper understanding.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I need to delve into this story to uncover the truth.”
  • A researcher might explain, “I’m going to delve into the data to find any patterns or correlations.”
  • In a conversation about a complex issue, someone might say, “Let’s delve into the details and figure out the root cause.”

27. Root around

To root around means to search or rummage through something in a casual or haphazard manner. It implies looking for something specific or trying to find information by exploring different options.

  • For instance, if you’re looking for your keys, you might say, “I need to root around in my bag to find them.”
  • When organizing a messy drawer, you might say, “I’ll root around in here to see what I can find.”
  • In a discussion about finding information, someone might suggest, “You should root around on the internet for more resources.”

28. Scour

To scour means to search or investigate thoroughly in order to find or discover something. It implies a careful and systematic examination of a particular area or source.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We need to scour the crime scene for any clues.”
  • A student preparing for an exam might explain, “I’m going to scour my notes to find the relevant information.”
  • In a conversation about finding a lost item, someone might suggest, “Let’s scour the house from top to bottom.”

29. Ferret through

To ferret through means to search or rummage through something with determination and persistence. It implies a focused and thorough effort to find or uncover something.

  • For instance, if you’re looking for a specific document in a messy pile, you might say, “I’ll ferret through these papers to find it.”
  • When searching for a particular item in a cluttered closet, you might say, “I need to ferret through these clothes to locate it.”
  • In a discussion about finding information, someone might suggest, “You should ferret through the archives for relevant documents.”

30. Fish for

To fish for means to seek information indirectly or subtly, often by asking leading questions or making suggestive remarks. It implies trying to elicit a specific response or uncover hidden information.

  • For example, if you suspect someone is hiding something, you might say, “I’ll fish for answers by asking casual questions.”
  • When trying to find out someone’s opinion without directly asking, you might say, “I’ll fish for their thoughts by mentioning a related topic.”
  • In a conversation about gathering information, someone might suggest, “Instead of asking directly, try fishing for details by dropping hints.”
See also  Top 29 Slang For Self Starting – Meaning & Usage