Top 20 Slang For Follow Through – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to getting things done, having the right slang for follow through can make all the difference. Whether you’re trying to stay motivated or just looking for some new ways to express your determination, we’ve got you covered. Join us as we break down the top phrases that will help you stay on track and achieve your goals. Let’s dive in and level up your follow-through game!

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1. Keep your word

This phrase means to fulfill or follow through on a promise or commitment. It emphasizes the importance of keeping one’s word and not breaking promises.

  • For example, if someone says, “I’ll help you move next weekend,” they need to keep their word and actually show up to help.
  • In a conversation about trustworthiness, someone might say, “Keeping your word is crucial for building strong relationships.”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “If you want to succeed, you must always keep your word and follow through on your commitments.”

2. Follow through like a champ

This phrase is used to encourage someone to complete a task or goal with determination and success. It implies that they should not give up or lose focus until they have accomplished what they set out to do.

  • For instance, if someone is struggling to finish a project, you might say, “Come on, you can do it! Follow through like a champ!”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say to their team, “We need to follow through like champs and give it our all in the last quarter.”
  • A motivational poster might feature the phrase “Follow through like a champ” alongside an image of an athlete in action.

3. Make it happen

This phrase is used to encourage someone to take action and achieve a desired outcome. It emphasizes the importance of not just talking about something, but actually making it a reality.

  • For example, if someone is discussing their dreams and aspirations, you might say, “Stop dreaming and start doing! Make it happen!”
  • In a business setting, a manager might say to their team, “We have a tight deadline, but I know we can make it happen if we all work together.”
  • A motivational speaker might use the phrase “Make it happen” to inspire their audience to take charge of their lives and pursue their goals.

4. Go the distance

This phrase means to put in the necessary effort and perseverance to achieve success. It implies that one should not give up or quit easily, but instead go above and beyond to accomplish their goals.

  • For instance, if someone is training for a marathon, you might say, “Don’t give up! Keep pushing and go the distance!”
  • In a discussion about career success, someone might say, “To be successful, you have to be willing to go the distance and put in the extra effort.”
  • A coach might use the phrase “Go the distance” to motivate their team to give their all and strive for victory.
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5. See it through

This phrase means to complete a task or project until the end. It emphasizes the importance of not giving up or abandoning something halfway through, but instead seeing it through to completion.

  • For example, if someone is struggling to finish a difficult assignment, you might say, “You’re almost there! Stay focused and see it through!”
  • In a discussion about perseverance, someone might say, “Success requires the ability to see things through, even when the going gets tough.”
  • A motivational quote might say, “Don’t just start something, see it through to the end and achieve greatness.”

6. Close the deal

This phrase is often used in business or sales contexts to describe the act of finalizing an agreement or making a sale.

  • For example, a salesperson might say, “I was able to close the deal and secure a new client.”
  • In a negotiation, someone might say, “We need to find a way to close the deal and reach a mutually beneficial agreement.”
  • A business owner might discuss their success by saying, “I closed the deal on a major partnership that will greatly benefit our company.”

7. Deliver the goods

This phrase is used to describe the act of following through and meeting expectations or obligations.

  • For instance, a project manager might say, “Our team worked hard to deliver the goods and complete the project on time.”
  • When discussing a reliable employee, someone might say, “He always delivers the goods and consistently produces high-quality work.”
  • In a personal context, a friend might say, “I know I can count on you to deliver the goods and help me when I need it.”

8. Finish what you started

This phrase emphasizes the importance of not leaving things unfinished and seeing a task through to completion.

  • For example, a coach might motivate their team by saying, “Let’s finish what we started and win this game.”
  • A student might remind themselves, “I need to finish what I started and complete my research paper before the deadline.”
  • In a personal development context, someone might say, “I’m determined to finish what I started and achieve my goals.”

9. See it to fruition

This phrase suggests the importance of not only starting something but also ensuring its successful completion.

  • For instance, a business owner might say, “We have a great idea, but we need to see it to fruition and make it a reality.”
  • When discussing a long-term goal, someone might say, “I’m committed to seeing it to fruition and accomplishing what I set out to do.”
  • In a creative context, an artist might say, “I have a vision for this painting, and I’m determined to see it to fruition.”

10. Keep the ball rolling

This phrase is often used to encourage continuous progress or forward movement in a project or situation.

  • For example, a team leader might say, “We’re making great progress, let’s keep the ball rolling and finish strong.”
  • In a brainstorming session, someone might say, “We have some great ideas, let’s keep the ball rolling and explore more options.”
  • When discussing a successful initiative, someone might say, “We need to keep the ball rolling and build on our achievements.”

11. Carry out

To “carry out” something means to successfully complete or finish a task or action. It implies following through on a commitment or responsibility.

  • For example, a manager might say, “Make sure you carry out the instructions I gave you.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “We need everyone to carry out their assigned roles during the game.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might ask, “Did you carry out the project as planned?”

12. See it out

To “see it out” means to persist or continue with something until it is completed or resolved. It implies not giving up or abandoning a task or goal.

  • For instance, a coach might say to their team, “Stay focused and see it out until the final whistle.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult project, someone might say, “We faced many challenges, but we were determined to see it out.”
  • A friend might encourage another by saying, “You can do it! Just stay strong and see it out.”

13. Stick with it

To “stick with it” means to continue or persevere with determination, especially when facing challenges or obstacles. It implies not giving up or quitting.

  • For example, a teacher might say to a struggling student, “Don’t give up, stick with it, and you’ll improve.”
  • In a discussion about a long-term goal, someone might say, “It’s important to stick with it, even when things get tough.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “We’ve come too far to give up now. Let’s stick with it and push through.”

14. Go all the way

To “go all the way” means to fully commit or complete a task or goal. It implies giving it your all and not stopping until you reach the desired outcome.

  • For instance, a coach might say to their team, “If we want to win, we have to go all the way and give it everything we’ve got.”
  • In a conversation about a competition, someone might say, “I’m determined to go all the way and come out on top.”
  • A friend might encourage another by saying, “You’re so close to achieving your goal. Keep pushing and go all the way.”

15. Hold up your end of the bargain

To “hold up your end of the bargain” means to fulfill or complete your part of an agreement or deal. It implies being reliable and following through on your commitments.

  • For example, in a business negotiation, someone might say, “If you want us to proceed, you need to hold up your end of the bargain.”
  • In a conversation about teamwork, a colleague might say, “We all need to hold up our end of the bargain to ensure success.”
  • A friend might remind another by saying, “Remember, you promised to help me move. Don’t forget to hold up your end of the bargain.”

16. Stand by your word

This phrase means to fulfill or honor your commitment or promise. It emphasizes the importance of being reliable and trustworthy.

  • For example, if someone says, “I’ll be there at 8 pm,” and they actually show up at that time, they are standing by their word.
  • In a conversation about trustworthiness, someone might say, “A person who stands by their word is someone you can count on.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage their audience by saying, “If you want to earn respect, always stand by your word.”

17. Make good on your promise

This expression means to follow through and fulfill what you have promised or committed to do.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I’ll pay you back next week,” and they actually do, they have made good on their promise.
  • In a discussion about reliability, someone might say, “It’s important to make good on your promises if you want to maintain trust.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “If you make a promise, you need to make good on it.”

18. Keep the faith

This phrase is used to encourage someone to remain committed and not give up, especially in challenging or difficult situations.

  • For example, if someone is going through a tough time and a friend says, “Keep the faith, things will get better,” they are encouraging them to stay positive and not lose hope.
  • In a discussion about perseverance, someone might say, “Even when things get tough, it’s important to keep the faith and believe in yourself.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “Keep the faith and keep pushing, we can still win this game.”

19. Close the loop

This phrase means to finish or complete a task or project, especially one that has been left unfinished or unresolved.

  • For instance, if someone is working on a report and they need to gather some additional information, once they obtain that information and finalize the report, they have closed the loop.
  • In a discussion about efficiency, someone might say, “Closing the loop on tasks is essential for productivity.”
  • A project manager might remind their team, “Make sure to close the loop on all outstanding issues before the project deadline.”

20. Nail it

This slang term means to successfully complete or achieve something with great skill or precision.

  • For example, if someone is performing a difficult dance routine and they execute it flawlessly, they can be said to have nailed it.
  • In a conversation about success, someone might say, “She really nailed that presentation, it was impressive.”
  • A friend might compliment another by saying, “You nailed the recipe, it tastes amazing!”