Top 35 Slang For Follow Up – Meaning & Usage

Ever had a conversation where you needed to check back with someone but didn’t know how to say it in a cool way? We’ve got your back. In this article, we’ve rounded up the trendiest and most effective slang for follow up that will make you sound like a pro communicator. Stay tuned to level up your conversation game and never miss a beat in your interactions!

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1. Catch up

This phrase means to update someone on the latest information or events that they may have missed. It is often used when someone has been away or out of touch for a period of time.

  • For example, if you haven’t seen a friend in a while, you might say, “Let’s grab coffee and catch up.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might ask, “Can we schedule a meeting to catch up on the project?”
  • If someone is behind on a TV show, they might say, “I need to catch up on the latest episodes.”

2. Ping

In the context of follow-up, “ping” means to send a quick message or notification to someone to get their attention or remind them of something.

  • For instance, you might say, “I’ll ping you later to discuss the details.”
  • In a virtual meeting, a participant might ask, “Can you ping me when it’s my turn to speak?”
  • If you want to remind someone about a deadline, you could say, “Just wanted to ping you about the report that’s due tomorrow.”

3. Loop in

To “loop in” someone means to bring them into a conversation or discussion that they may not be aware of.

  • For example, if you’re discussing a project with a team and want to involve another colleague, you might say, “Let’s loop in Sarah for her input.”
  • During a conference call, someone might say, “Let’s loop in the client to discuss their feedback.”
  • If you want to make sure everyone is on the same page, you could say, “Let’s loop in the whole team for this decision.”

4. Reconnect

This word means to establish contact or communication with someone after a period of being out of touch or disconnected.

  • For instance, if you haven’t talked to a friend in a while, you might say, “We should reconnect and catch up.”
  • In a professional context, you might reach out to a former colleague and say, “I’d love to reconnect and see how things are going.”
  • If you want to revive a business relationship, you could say, “Let’s reconnect and discuss potential opportunities.”

5. Drop a line

This phrase means to send a brief message or communication to someone.

  • For example, if you haven’t talked to a friend in a while, you might say, “Drop me a line and let me know how you’re doing.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might ask, “Can you drop me a line with the latest updates on the project?”
  • If you want to stay in touch with someone, you could say, “Feel free to drop me a line anytime.”

6. Chase up

To contact someone or take action in order to get an update or further information about something.

  • For example, “I’ll chase up with the supplier to see if the order has been shipped.”
  • In a work setting, a manager might say, “Chase up on that report and make sure it’s completed by the end of the day.”
  • A friend might ask, “Did you chase up with Sarah about the party details?”

7. Stay in the loop

To stay updated and aware of the latest information or developments regarding a particular situation or topic.

  • For instance, “Make sure to stay in the loop with the project updates.”
  • In a group chat, someone might say, “Keep me in the loop if anything changes.”
  • A colleague might advise, “If you want to be successful in this company, it’s important to stay in the loop with the latest industry trends.”

8. Give a shout

To contact or reach out to someone.

  • For example, “Give me a shout if you need any help with the project.”
  • A friend might say, “I haven’t seen you in a while. Give me a shout and let’s catch up.”
  • When making plans, someone might suggest, “Give a shout to the rest of the group and see if they’re available.”

9. Pop in

To visit someone or somewhere briefly and informally.

  • For instance, “I’ll pop in at the store on my way home to grab some groceries.”
  • A friend might say, “Feel free to pop in anytime. I’m usually home.”
  • When inviting someone over, someone might say, “Why don’t you pop in for a cup of coffee?”

10. Hit up

To contact or ask someone for something, often with the intention of making a request or getting information.

  • For example, “I’ll hit up John to see if he wants to join us for dinner.”
  • A colleague might say, “Hit me up if you need any help with the presentation.”
  • When looking for recommendations, someone might ask, “Can you hit up your friends and see if they know any good restaurants in the area?”

11. Follow up

To check in or follow up with someone means to contact them or reach out to them for an update or to continue a conversation or task. It is a way of ensuring that communication and progress are maintained.

  • For example, “I’ll follow up with you next week to see if you need any further assistance.”
  • In a business setting, a manager might say, “Make sure to follow up with the client to confirm the details of the project.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Can you follow up with HR about the new employee benefits?”

12. Keep in touch

To keep in touch with someone means to maintain regular communication or contact with them, usually through phone calls, text messages, or social media. It is a way of staying connected and updated on each other’s lives.

  • For instance, “Let’s exchange numbers so we can keep in touch.”
  • A friend might say, “We should make an effort to keep in touch even though we’re moving to different cities.”
  • A family member might remind another, “Don’t forget to keep in touch and let us know how you’re doing.”

13. Keep on top of

To keep on top of something means to stay informed or up-to-date about it. It is a way of ensuring that one is aware of the latest developments or changes in a particular area or topic.

  • For example, “I need to keep on top of the latest fashion trends for my job.”
  • A student might say, “I have to keep on top of my assignments to avoid falling behind.”
  • A news enthusiast might declare, “I make it a point to keep on top of current events by reading the newspaper every morning.”

14. Keep in the loop

To keep someone in the loop means to keep them informed or updated about a particular situation or development. It is a way of ensuring that they are included and aware of relevant information.

  • For instance, “Please keep me in the loop regarding any changes to the project.”
  • A team member might ask, “Can you keep me in the loop about any decisions made in the meeting?”
  • A manager might reassure an employee, “Don’t worry, I’ll keep you in the loop about the progress of the project.”

15. Keep posted

To keep someone posted means to keep them informed or updated about a particular situation or event. It is a way of ensuring that they are aware of any new information or developments.

  • For example, “I’ll keep you posted on the outcome of the meeting.”
  • A friend might say, “Keep me posted about your travel plans.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Can you keep me posted on the status of the project?”

16. Keep track

To consistently follow and monitor the progress or status of something or someone. The phrase “keep track” is often used to indicate the need to stay updated or informed.

  • For example, a project manager might say, “Make sure to keep track of all the tasks and deadlines.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “You need to keep track of your assignments and due dates.”
  • In a conversation about personal goals, someone might say, “I use a journal to keep track of my daily habits and progress.”

17. Keep an eye on

To pay attention to or monitor someone or something closely. The phrase “keep an eye on” implies the need for careful observation and vigilance.

  • For instance, a parent might say to their child, “Keep an eye on your younger sibling while I’m out.”
  • In a neighborhood watch program, residents are encouraged to keep an eye on suspicious activities.
  • A supervisor might instruct an employee, “Keep an eye on the stock levels and notify me if anything runs low.”

18. Stay on top of

To remain up-to-date or knowledgeable about a particular subject or situation. The phrase “stay on top of” suggests the importance of staying informed and not falling behind.

  • For example, a news anchor might say, “Stay on top of the latest developments by following our updates.”
  • In a business context, a manager might advise their team, “Stay on top of industry trends to remain competitive.”
  • A student might tell their friend, “If you want to do well in the class, you need to stay on top of the readings and assignments.”

19. Stay in the know

To remain knowledgeable or aware of current information or trends. The phrase “stay in the know” conveys the importance of staying updated and not being left out.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Follow this blog to stay in the know about the latest fashion trends.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might mention, “It’s important to stay in the know about new software updates and features.”
  • A colleague might advise another, “Attend industry conferences to stay in the know about upcoming developments.”

20. Stay in touch

To maintain communication or contact with someone. The phrase “stay in touch” emphasizes the importance of staying connected and not losing contact.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Even though we’re moving to different cities, let’s stay in touch.”
  • In a business context, a client might tell their service provider, “Please stay in touch with any updates or changes.”
  • A family member might remind their relative, “Don’t forget to stay in touch, even if we can’t meet in person.”

21. Keep tabs on

This phrase means to keep an eye on or stay updated about something or someone. It implies actively monitoring or tracking the progress or status of a particular situation or person.

  • For example, a supervisor might say, “Make sure to keep tabs on the progress of the project.”
  • A parent might tell their teenager, “I’ll be keeping tabs on your grades this semester.”
  • In a conversation about a suspicious neighbor, someone might say, “I’ve been keeping tabs on him to see if anything unusual happens.”

22. Keep an eye out

This phrase means to be alert and watchful for something or someone. It implies being vigilant and ready to take action or notice any important developments.

  • For instance, a hiker might say, “Keep an eye out for any signs of wildlife.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Keep an eye out for any changes in the weather.”
  • In a discussion about finding a lost item, someone might advise, “Keep an eye out for it in places you least expect.”

23. Keep watch

This phrase means to remain alert and attentive, usually in order to guard or protect something or someone. It implies being watchful and ready to respond to any potential threats or changes.

  • For example, a security guard might be instructed to “keep watch” over a building during the night.
  • A parent might say to their child, “Keep watch for any strangers approaching the house.”
  • In a conversation about a potential danger, someone might say, “We need to keep watch and be prepared for any unexpected situations.”

24. Keep an ear to the ground

This phrase means to actively listen or gather information about a particular situation or topic. It implies staying informed and being aware of any relevant updates or changes.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “I’ll keep an ear to the ground for any news about the upcoming election.”
  • A supervisor might advise their team, “Keep an ear to the ground for any rumors or changes in the company.”
  • In a discussion about a potential job opportunity, someone might say, “I’ll keep an ear to the ground for any openings in that field.”

25. Get back to

This phrase means to respond or reply to someone or something at a later time. It implies acknowledging the need for further communication or action.

  • For example, a colleague might say, “I’ll get back to you with the information you requested.”
  • A friend might tell another friend, “I’ll get back to you about whether I can attend the party.”
  • In a conversation about a pending decision, someone might say, “Let me think about it and I’ll get back to you tomorrow.”

26. Run it by

This phrase is used when seeking someone’s opinion or approval on a decision or idea.

  • For example, “I have an idea for a new project. Can I run it by you?”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “Before we finalize the presentation, let’s run it by our supervisor.”
  • A friend might ask, “I’m thinking of getting a new tattoo. Mind if I run the design by you?”

27. Report back

This term is used when someone is asked to provide a status update or share information after completing a task or assignment.

  • For instance, a boss might say, “Please research this topic and report back to me with your findings.”
  • In a group project, a team member might be assigned a specific task and asked to report back with their progress.
  • A parent might ask their child, “Can you go check on your sibling and report back to me?”

28. Touch in

This phrase is used to describe a quick and brief interaction or communication with someone, often to check on their well-being or to provide a brief update.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I just wanted to touch in and see how you’re doing.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might send a quick email saying, “Just touching in to let you know I’ve completed my part of the project.”
  • A parent might text their child, “Just wanted to touch in and remind you to lock the front door before you leave.”

29. Drop a note

This phrase is used when someone wants to send a quick message or leave a written note for someone else.

  • For instance, a coworker might say, “Can you drop a note to our manager to let them know about the issue?”
  • In a personal setting, someone might leave a note for their roommate saying, “I won’t be home for dinner tonight. Please save some for me.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Can you drop a note to your teacher explaining why you were absent yesterday?”

30. Hit back

This term is used when someone wants to respond or retaliate after being attacked or criticized.

  • For example, in a heated argument, one person might say, “If you insult me again, I will hit back with everything I’ve got.”
  • In a sports context, a player might say, “If the opponent scores, we need to hit back quickly to regain momentum.”
  • A person might say, “I won’t let them spread false rumors about me. I’m going to hit back with the truth.”

31. Keep the conversation going

This phrase is used to encourage others to continue participating in a conversation or to keep the dialogue going.

  • For example, “Let’s keep the conversation going by sharing our thoughts on this topic.”
  • In a group chat, someone might say, “I really enjoyed our discussion yesterday. Let’s keep the conversation going today.”
  • A team leader might encourage their team by saying, “We’ve made great progress so far. Let’s keep the conversation going and come up with even more ideas.”

32. Reach out

This phrase is used to express the act of initiating communication or contacting someone, often with the intention of starting a conversation or offering assistance.

  • For instance, “Feel free to reach out if you have any questions or need help.”
  • A friend might say, “I haven’t heard from you in a while. Just wanted to reach out and see how you’re doing.”
  • In a professional context, someone might write, “I wanted to reach out and introduce myself. I’m excited to work together.”

33. Keep on the radar

This phrase means to stay informed or keep someone or something in your attention or awareness.

  • For example, “Make sure to keep this project on the radar so we don’t forget about it.”
  • A manager might say, “We need to keep this issue on the radar and address it as soon as possible.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might suggest, “Let’s keep this idea on the radar and revisit it in our next meeting.”

34. Keep the thread alive

This phrase is used to encourage others to continue participating in an online discussion thread or forum.

  • For instance, “Let’s keep the thread alive by sharing our opinions and experiences.”
  • In a forum, someone might comment, “I’m really interested in this topic. Let’s keep the thread alive and explore it further.”
  • A moderator might remind users, “Please keep the thread alive by staying on topic and respecting each other’s opinions.”

35. Keep the momentum

This phrase means to continue making progress or maintaining the current rate of progress in a project or activity.

  • For example, “We’re doing great so far. Let’s keep the momentum and finish this project on time.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “We’ve had a successful season so far. Let’s keep the momentum and win the next game.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We’re seeing positive results. Let’s keep the momentum and build on our success.”
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