Top 68 Slang For Following Up – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to staying in the loop and keeping conversations flowing, knowing the right slang for following up can make all the difference. Whether it’s in person or online, mastering these phrases can help you navigate social interactions with ease. Join us as we unveil a list of top slang terms for following up that will have you communicating like a pro in no time. Get ready to level up your communication game and never miss a beat in your conversations again!

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1. Circle back

To circle back means to revisit or reconnect with someone or something, usually in order to provide an update or follow up on a previous conversation or task.

  • For example, “Let’s circle back next week to discuss the progress of the project.”
  • In a business setting, a manager might say, “I’ll circle back with you after the meeting to discuss your proposal.”
  • When planning a social event, someone might suggest, “Let’s circle back closer to the date to finalize the details.”

2. Touch base

To touch base means to get in contact or communicate with someone, usually to check on their progress or exchange information.

  • For instance, “I’ll touch base with you tomorrow to see how the project is coming along.”
  • In a professional setting, a colleague might say, “Let’s touch base before the meeting to go over our presentation.”
  • When catching up with a friend, someone might say, “We should touch base soon and plan a get-together.”

3. Ping

To ping means to send a quick message or notification to someone, often to get their attention or prompt a response.

  • For example, “I’ll ping you an email with the details.”
  • In a digital context, someone might say, “I’ll ping you on Slack to discuss the issue.”
  • When trying to schedule a meeting, a person might suggest, “Ping me your availability for next week.”

4. Check in

To check in means to see how someone is doing or to inquire about their progress or well-being.

  • For instance, “I’ll check in with you later to see if you need any help.”
  • In a professional setting, a manager might say, “Let’s check in on the status of the project during our next team meeting.”
  • When catching up with a friend, someone might ask, “Just wanted to check in and see how you’re doing. Everything alright?”

5. Follow through

To follow through means to complete a task or fulfill a promise, often emphasizing the importance of taking action and not just making empty commitments.

  • For example, “Don’t just make promises, make sure to follow through on them.”
  • In a business context, a colleague might say, “We need to follow through on our action plan to achieve our goals.”
  • When discussing personal goals, someone might say, “I’m determined to follow through on my fitness routine this year.”

6. Loop in

To “loop in” someone means to include them in a conversation or update, usually by forwarding them an email or adding them to a group chat. It is a way to keep someone informed or involved in a discussion.

  • For example, “I’ll loop in my manager on this email thread so they are aware of the situation.”
  • In a team project, a member might say, “Let’s loop in the designer to get their input on the new website layout.”
  • A colleague might ask, “Can you loop me in on the latest developments in the project?”

7. Keep tabs

To “keep tabs” on someone or something means to monitor or track them closely, usually to stay updated on their activities or progress.

  • For instance, a parent might say to their teenager, “I’ll be keeping tabs on your grades this semester.”
  • In a business context, a supervisor might say, “Make sure to keep tabs on the inventory levels to avoid shortages.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you keep tabs on the event’s schedule and let me know when the keynote speaker starts?”

8. Catch up

To “catch up” means to get up to date with someone or something, usually after a period of time or when there is a lot of new information or developments.

  • For example, “Let’s grab coffee and catch up on each other’s lives.”
  • When returning from vacation, a coworker might say, “I need to catch up on emails and see what I missed.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you catch me up on the latest gossip?”

9. Reconnect

To “reconnect” means to establish communication or a relationship again with someone, usually after a period of time or when there has been a loss of contact.

  • For instance, “I bumped into an old classmate and we decided to reconnect over lunch.”
  • After a disagreement, someone might say, “I think it’s time for us to reconnect and resolve our differences.”
  • A distant relative might reach out and say, “I would love to reconnect with the family and learn more about our shared history.”

10. Drop a line

To “drop a line” means to send a brief message or update to someone, usually to check in or share a quick piece of information.

  • For example, “Just wanted to drop a line and see how you’re doing.”
  • When finishing a project, a team member might say, “I’ll drop a line to the client and let them know it’s completed.”
  • A friend might send a text saying, “Just dropping a line to remind you about our dinner plans tonight.”

11. Keep in touch

This phrase is used to encourage someone to maintain contact or communication with another person. It implies that the person should continue to stay connected or keep the lines of communication open.

  • For example, after meeting someone at a networking event, you might say, “It was great meeting you. Let’s keep in touch!”
  • In a farewell message, you might write, “Although we’ll be far apart, let’s make sure to keep in touch.”
  • A friend might say, “We should keep in touch more often. It’s been too long since we caught up.”

12. Stay in the loop

This phrase means to stay informed or updated about a particular situation or topic. It implies that the person should remain connected to the latest information or developments.

  • For instance, in a work setting, a colleague might say, “Make sure to stay in the loop on the new project.”
  • In a group chat, someone might say, “I’ll keep you in the loop about any updates on our plans.”
  • A friend might tell you, “I’ll let you know if there are any changes to our weekend plans. Just stay in the loop.”

13. Get back to

This phrase is used to remind someone to respond or reply to a previous message or request. It implies that the person should take action and provide a response.

  • For example, if someone sends you an email asking for your opinion, they might say, “Take your time, but please get back to me when you can.”
  • In a text message conversation, someone might say, “I’ll ask my boss and get back to you with an answer.”
  • A coworker might remind you, “The client is waiting for your input. Can you get back to them by the end of the day?”

14. Nudge

This term is used to gently remind or prompt someone to take action or respond to a previous message or request. It implies a subtle encouragement or reminder.

  • For instance, if someone hasn’t replied to your message, you might send a follow-up message saying, “Just wanted to give you a little nudge to see if you saw my previous message.”
  • In a group chat, someone might say, “Hey, just a friendly nudge to remind everyone about the meeting tomorrow.”
  • A friend might playfully nudge you and say, “Hey, remember you promised to help me with that favor. Any progress?”

15. Chase up

This phrase means to follow up or pursue a matter that requires attention or resolution. It implies taking action to ensure that something is addressed or completed.

  • For example, if you’re waiting for a response to an important email, you might say, “I’ll chase up with them to make sure they received it.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We need to chase up on the outstanding invoices to ensure timely payment.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Have you chased up with the IT department about the software issue?”

16. Hound

When you hound someone, you persistently ask or remind them about a particular matter. It can be seen as a form of following up, especially when someone is being persistent in their requests or reminders.

  • For example, if you keep asking your friend about the plans for the weekend, you might say, “Sorry to hound you, but have you made a decision yet?”
  • In a work setting, if you constantly remind your coworker about a pending task, you might say, “I hate to hound you, but we really need that report by tomorrow.”
  • If you are continuously asking someone for a favor, you might say, “I don’t mean to hound you, but could you please return my book?”

17. Run it by

When you run something by someone, you are seeking their approval or feedback on a particular matter. It is a way of following up to ensure that the person is on board with your idea or decision.

  • For instance, if you have a new project idea, you might say, “I wanted to run it by you before moving forward.”
  • In a group discussion, if you propose a solution, you might ask, “Can I run this idea by everyone to get their input?”
  • If you are unsure about a decision and want someone’s opinion, you might say, “I need to run this by my supervisor before making a final call.”

18. Revisit

When you revisit something, you go back to it and review or reconsider it. It is a way of following up on a previous matter to ensure that it is still valid or to make necessary changes.

  • For example, if you had a previous conversation about a certain topic, you might say, “I think we need to revisit that discussion.”
  • In a project meeting, if a previous decision needs to be reconsidered, you might suggest, “Let’s revisit our initial plan and see if any adjustments are needed.”
  • If you are reviewing an old document and want to discuss it further, you might say, “I found some interesting points in this report. Can we revisit it in our next meeting?”

19. Recap

When you recap something, you provide a summary or brief overview of it. It is a way of following up on a previous discussion or event to ensure that everyone is on the same page.

  • For instance, at the end of a meeting, you might say, “Before we wrap up, let’s do a quick recap of the key points.”
  • In a sports game, if the commentator summarizes the highlights, they might say, “Let’s recap the action from the first half.”
  • If you missed a previous episode of a TV show and want a brief summary, you might ask, “Can you recap what happened in the last episode?”

20. Rehash

When you rehash something, you discuss or go over it again, often in an unnecessary or repetitive way. It is a way of following up that can sometimes be seen as unproductive or tiresome.

  • For example, if a group keeps discussing the same topic without making progress, you might say, “We’re just rehashing the same points over and over.”
  • In a relationship argument, if old issues resurface without resolution, one person might say, “Here we go again, rehashing the past.”
  • If a team keeps revisiting a failed strategy without considering alternatives, a member might suggest, “Let’s stop rehashing the same approach and try something new.”

21. Regroup

To regroup means to come together again after being apart or scattered. It can also refer to reorganizing or reassessing a situation.

  • For example, after a team meeting, a manager might say, “Let’s regroup next week to discuss our progress.”
  • In a group project, a member might suggest, “We should regroup and assign new tasks.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s regroup at the coffee shop after work and catch up.”

22. Double-check

To double-check means to verify or confirm something by checking it again. It is a way to ensure accuracy or avoid mistakes.

  • For instance, before submitting a report, a person might say, “I need to double-check all the numbers.”
  • When packing for a trip, someone might remind themselves, “Double-check that you have your passport.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Double-check your answers before handing in your test.”

23. Keep on top of

To keep on top of something means to stay updated or informed about it. It implies actively monitoring or staying ahead of developments.

  • For example, a manager might say, “We need to keep on top of industry trends to remain competitive.”
  • A news junkie might say, “I always keep on top of the latest headlines.”
  • A parent might remind their child, “Keep on top of your homework so you don’t fall behind.”

24. Shoot a message

To shoot a message means to send a message, typically through electronic means such as text messaging or email.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Shoot me a message when you’re free and we can meet up.”
  • When coordinating plans, someone might say, “I’ll shoot you a message with the details.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Can you shoot me a message with the updated schedule?”

25. Hit up

To hit up someone means to contact or visit them, often with a specific purpose in mind.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I’ll hit you up later to see if you want to grab dinner.”
  • When in a new city, someone might ask a local, “Where’s the best place to hit up for live music?”
  • A coworker might say, “I need to hit up IT to fix my computer.”

26. Stay on top of

This phrase means to stay informed or updated about a particular situation or topic. It implies being proactive and not letting things slip through the cracks.

  • For example, a manager might say to their team, “Make sure you stay on top of the latest industry trends.”
  • In a conversation about staying organized, someone might suggest, “Use a task management app to help you stay on top of your to-do list.”
  • A friend might remind you, “Don’t forget to stay on top of your emails and respond in a timely manner.”

27. Give a shout

This phrase means to get in touch or contact someone. It is often used as a casual way to ask someone to reach out or communicate.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Give me a shout when you’re free and we can catch up.”
  • In a work context, a colleague might say, “If you have any questions, feel free to give me a shout.”
  • Someone might post on social media, “Looking for a new apartment in the city. If you know of any leads, give me a shout!”

28. Keep the ball rolling

This phrase means to continue the progress or momentum of a project or conversation. It suggests not letting things come to a standstill and actively keeping things moving forward.

  • For example, a team leader might say, “Great job on the first phase. Let’s keep the ball rolling and move on to the next steps.”
  • In a meeting, someone might suggest, “To keep the ball rolling, let’s set deadlines for each task.”
  • A friend might encourage you, “You’re doing great in your new job. Keep the ball rolling and keep learning and growing!”

29. Check back

This phrase means to follow up or revisit something at a later time. It implies the need to check for updates or new information.

  • For instance, a customer might ask, “Can you check back with me in a week to see if the product is back in stock?”
  • In a research project, someone might say, “I’ll check back with the latest scientific studies to see if there have been any new findings.”
  • A friend might suggest, “Check back on the website tomorrow. They might have restocked the item you were looking for.”

30. Reach out

This phrase means to initiate contact or communication with someone. It implies taking the first step and reaching out to start a conversation or ask for assistance.

  • For example, a job seeker might say, “I’m going to reach out to the hiring manager to express my interest in the position.”
  • In a networking context, someone might suggest, “Don’t be afraid to reach out to professionals in your field for advice or mentorship.”
  • A friend might say, “If you ever need someone to talk to, don’t hesitate to reach out. I’m here for you.”

31. Keep the conversation going

This phrase is used to encourage someone to continue or prolong a conversation or discussion. It suggests that the person should keep contributing to the conversation to keep it active and engaging.

  • For example, if someone shares an interesting story, you might say, “That’s fascinating! Tell me more and keep the conversation going.”
  • In a group chat, if the conversation starts to die down, someone might say, “Let’s find a new topic to keep the conversation going.”
  • When discussing a controversial issue, someone might say, “We need to keep the conversation going to explore different perspectives.”

32. Hit back

This phrase is used to indicate that someone should respond or reply to a previous message or comment. It suggests taking action to continue the conversation or address a specific point.

  • For instance, if someone asks a question in an email, you might reply, “I’ll hit back with an answer as soon as possible.”
  • In a heated debate, one person might say, “I can’t let that comment go unanswered. I’ll hit back with my counterarguments.”
  • When discussing a proposal, someone might say, “I’ll hit back with some suggestions and feedback after reviewing the document.”

33. Give a heads up

This phrase is used to inform someone about something in advance, usually to provide a warning or give them a notice about a future event or situation.

  • For example, if you’re running late for a meeting, you might send a message saying, “Just wanted to give you a heads up that I’ll be arriving 10 minutes late.”
  • If you’re going to make a significant change to a project, you might say, “I’ll give everyone a heads up before implementing the new plan.”
  • When planning a surprise party, someone might say, “Remember to give the guest of honor a heads up so they don’t make other plans.”

34. Keep an eye on

This phrase is used to suggest that someone should monitor or watch something closely, typically to ensure its safety, progress, or development.

  • For instance, if you’re house-sitting for a friend, they might say, “Please keep an eye on the plants and water them if needed.”
  • In a project management context, someone might say, “I’ll keep an eye on the budget to make sure we stay within our limits.”
  • When discussing market trends, someone might say, “We should keep an eye on the competition to stay ahead of the game.”

35. Keep the thread alive

This phrase is used to encourage someone to continue participating in an online discussion or thread. It suggests that the person should keep posting or commenting to prevent the conversation from becoming inactive or stagnant.

  • For example, in a forum, someone might say, “Let’s keep the thread alive by sharing our thoughts and experiences.”
  • In a social media group, if the engagement starts to drop, someone might post, “We need to keep the thread alive with interesting content and discussions.”
  • When discussing a controversial topic, someone might say, “It’s important to keep the thread alive to ensure all viewpoints are heard and considered.”

36. Keep the dialogue open

This phrase is used to encourage ongoing communication and to ensure that the conversation remains open and active.

  • For example, a manager might say to their team, “Let’s keep the dialogue open so we can address any concerns or questions.”
  • In a business negotiation, one party might suggest, “We need to keep the dialogue open to find a mutually beneficial solution.”
  • A friend might say, “I appreciate your honesty. Let’s keep the dialogue open and work through any issues that arise.”

37. Keep the connection alive

This phrase is used to emphasize the importance of maintaining a connection or relationship with someone.

  • For instance, a long-distance couple might say, “We need to keep the connection alive by scheduling regular video calls.”
  • In a professional context, a salesperson might say, “It’s essential to keep the connection alive with potential clients by following up regularly.”
  • A friend might remind another, “Even though we’re busy, let’s make an effort to keep the connection alive and catch up regularly.”

38. Keep the line of communication open

This phrase is used to emphasize the importance of maintaining open lines of communication and ensuring that information can flow freely.

  • For example, a teacher might say to their students, “Please keep the line of communication open by reaching out if you have any questions.”
  • In a team setting, a manager might remind their employees, “We need to keep the line of communication open to avoid misunderstandings and promote collaboration.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “No matter what, I want you to know that we’ll always keep the line of communication open.”

39. Keep the channel open

This phrase is used to emphasize the importance of maintaining open channels of communication and ensuring that information can flow freely.

  • For instance, a supervisor might say to their team, “Let’s keep the channel open for feedback and suggestions.”
  • In a customer service context, a representative might assure a customer, “We’re here to help. Please keep the channel open and let us know if you have any further issues.”
  • A friend might say, “No matter what happens, let’s promise to keep the channel open and be there for each other.”

40. Keep the link active

This phrase is used to emphasize the importance of keeping a connection or relationship active and ensuring that it remains strong.

  • For example, a business partner might say, “Let’s keep the link active by regularly updating each other on our progress.”
  • In a networking context, someone might suggest, “To build a strong professional network, it’s important to keep the link active by reaching out and staying in touch.”
  • A family member might say, “Even though we live far apart, let’s make an effort to keep the link active by scheduling regular visits or video calls.”

41. Keep in the loop

To stay informed or updated about a particular situation or topic. It means to be included in the ongoing communication or to be kept in the know.

  • For example, “Please keep me in the loop regarding any updates on the project.”
  • A colleague might say, “I’ll make sure to keep you in the loop about the client’s response.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might mention, “Let’s keep everyone in the loop by sending regular progress reports.”

42. Stay in touch

To continue communicating or staying connected with someone. It means to keep in contact or not lose touch with someone.

  • For instance, “Even though we’re in different cities, let’s make sure to stay in touch.”
  • A friend might say, “It was great catching up with you. Let’s stay in touch.”
  • When leaving a social gathering, someone might suggest, “Let’s exchange numbers so we can stay in touch.”

43. Keep posted

To keep someone updated or informed about a particular situation or development. It means to provide regular updates or to keep someone in the loop.

  • For example, “I’ll keep you posted on any changes to the schedule.”
  • A team leader might say, “As we progress with the project, I’ll keep everyone posted on the latest updates.”
  • In an email, someone might write, “Please keep me posted on any new developments regarding the job opportunity.”

44. Drop a note

To send a short message or note to someone. It means to quickly communicate or reach out to someone.

  • For instance, “I’ll drop a note to let them know about the change in plans.”
  • A colleague might say, “If you have any questions, feel free to drop me a note.”
  • When leaving a friend’s house, someone might say, “Thanks for having me over. I’ll drop you a note to arrange our next get-together.”

45. Keep in the know

To stay informed or updated about a particular topic or situation. It means to be aware of the latest information or developments.

  • For example, “It’s important to keep in the know about current events.”
  • A coworker might say, “I’ll make sure to keep you in the know about any changes to the project.”
  • In a conversation about industry trends, someone might mention, “To stay competitive, it’s crucial to keep in the know about emerging technologies.”

46. See how it’s going

This phrase is used to inquire about the current status or progress of something. It is a casual way to ask for an update or to see how something is going.

  • For example, if you assigned a task to a colleague, you might ask, “Hey, can you see how it’s going with that project?”
  • In a conversation about a friend’s new job, you might say, “I should see how it’s going with their new company.”
  • If you are following up on a job application, you could say, “I just wanted to see how it’s going with my application.”

47. Keep the momentum

This phrase is used to encourage someone to continue making progress or to keep up the pace. It emphasizes the importance of not losing momentum and continuing to move forward.

  • For instance, if a team is working on a project, a leader might say, “Let’s keep the momentum and finish strong.”
  • In a fitness context, a trainer might motivate their client by saying, “You’re doing great! Keep the momentum going!”
  • If a student is studying for exams, a friend might say, “You’re doing awesome. Keep the momentum and keep studying.”

48. Keep the communication flowing

This phrase is used to encourage ongoing and effective communication. It emphasizes the importance of keeping the lines of communication open and ensuring that information continues to be shared.

  • For example, in a team meeting, a manager might say, “Let’s make sure we keep the communication flowing so that everyone is on the same page.”
  • In a romantic relationship, one partner might say, “We need to keep the communication flowing to avoid misunderstandings.”
  • If there is a breakdown in communication, a colleague might suggest, “We need to address the issue and find ways to keep the communication flowing.”

49. Keep the connection

This phrase is used to encourage someone to continue nurturing and maintaining a relationship. It emphasizes the importance of not letting the connection fade and making efforts to stay connected.

  • For instance, if you have a close friend who lives far away, you might say, “Even though we’re apart, let’s keep the connection strong.”
  • In a business context, a salesperson might tell a client, “I value our partnership. Let’s keep the connection and continue working together.”
  • If you want to stay in touch with someone you met at an event, you could say, “It was great meeting you. Let’s keep the connection and grab coffee sometime.”

50. Keep the link

This phrase is similar to “keep the connection” and is used to encourage someone to continue maintaining a connection or relationship. It emphasizes the importance of not letting the link between two people or entities weaken or break.

  • For example, if you have a friend who moved to a different city, you might say, “Let’s keep the link and plan visits.”
  • In a professional context, a colleague might say, “We’ve worked well together. Let’s keep the link and collaborate on future projects.”
  • If you want to stay connected with someone you met at a conference, you could say, “It was great meeting you. Let’s keep the link and stay in touch.”

51. Keep the touch

This phrase means to maintain communication or connection with someone. It suggests the importance of continuing to keep in touch with the person.

  • For example, “After the conference, let’s keep the touch and follow up with each other.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “It’s essential to keep the touch with our clients to ensure customer satisfaction.”
  • A friend might remind another, “Don’t forget to keep the touch and let me know how your job interview went.”

52. Keep the door open

This expression means to leave the possibility of something open or available. It implies keeping options or opportunities available for the future.

  • For instance, “Even though we didn’t reach an agreement, let’s keep the door open for future collaboration.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might say, “I’m interested in this position, so I want to keep the door open for further discussions.”
  • A friend might advise, “Even if you’re not sure about dating him, keep the door open and see how things develop.”

53. Keep the bridge

This phrase means to preserve a relationship or connection with someone. It suggests the importance of not burning bridges and keeping a positive relationship intact.

  • For example, “Even if we disagree, let’s keep the bridge and remain friends.”
  • In a professional setting, a colleague might say, “It’s essential to keep the bridge with former coworkers for networking purposes.”
  • A parent might advise their child, “Don’t let a small argument ruin your friendship. Keep the bridge and work things out.”

54. Keep the pathway

This expression means to ensure that a way to communicate or connect with someone remains open. It emphasizes the importance of not losing touch and keeping the pathway of communication intact.

  • For instance, “Even if we’re in different cities, let’s keep the pathway and stay connected through calls and messages.”
  • In a long-distance relationship, a partner might say, “It’s crucial to keep the pathway open and make an effort to communicate regularly.”
  • A friend might remind another, “Don’t let distance stop us. Let’s keep the pathway and stay in touch.”

55. Keep the route

This phrase means to ensure that a way to contact or reach someone remains available. It emphasizes the importance of not losing the means of communication and keeping the route open.

  • For example, “If you change your phone number, please let me know so we can keep the route.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “It’s crucial to keep the route of communication clear with our clients to address any issues.”
  • A parent might remind their child, “Make sure to keep the route open so we can reach you in case of emergencies.”

56. Keep the avenue

This phrase is used to encourage someone to continue with their thoughts or ideas in a conversation or discussion. It is a way of saying “keep going” or “don’t stop”.

  • For example, during a meeting, someone might say, “That’s a great point, keep the avenue!”
  • In a group discussion, a participant might say, “I’m really interested in what you were saying earlier, keep the avenue.”
  • When giving feedback on a presentation, a listener might say, “You had some really interesting insights, keep the avenue and explore them further.”

57. Keep the street

This phrase is used to remind someone to stay on topic or focused during a conversation or discussion. It is a way of saying “don’t veer off course” or “stick to the main point”.

  • For instance, during a brainstorming session, someone might say, “Let’s keep the street and focus on ideas related to the main objective.”
  • In a group discussion, a participant might say, “I understand your concern, but let’s keep the street and address the main issue at hand.”
  • When giving a presentation, a speaker might say, “I have a lot of information to cover, so let’s keep the street and stay on schedule.”

58. Keep the road

This phrase is used to encourage someone to continue making progress or maintain momentum in a project or task. It is a way of saying “don’t slow down” or “keep making forward progress”.

  • For example, during a team meeting, someone might say, “We’re doing great so far, let’s keep the road and finish strong.”
  • In a sports game, a coach might say, “We have the lead, let’s keep the road and not let up.”
  • When working on a long-term project, a team member might say, “We’ve made good progress, let’s keep the road and meet our deadlines.”

59. Keep the path

This phrase is used to remind someone to stay on track or follow the planned course of action. It is a way of saying “don’t deviate” or “stick to the plan”.

  • For instance, during a project meeting, someone might say, “We’re making good progress, let’s keep the path and meet our milestones.”
  • In a group discussion, a participant might say, “I understand there are different opinions, but let’s keep the path and follow the agreed-upon strategy.”
  • When organizing an event, a coordinator might say, “We have a detailed plan in place, let’s keep the path and execute it smoothly.”

60. Keep the track

This phrase is used to encourage someone to maintain their progress or stay focused on their goals. It is a way of saying “don’t lose momentum” or “stay on track”.

  • For example, during a fitness training session, a coach might say, “You’re doing great, keep the track and push through the last set.”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might say, “You’ve been making good progress, keep the track and meet the project deadline.”
  • When pursuing personal goals, a mentor might say, “You’re on the right path, keep the track and stay focused on your objectives.”

61. Keep the journey

This phrase is used to encourage someone to continue on their path or to keep going with a specific journey or experience.

  • For example, a friend might say, “You’ve come so far, keep the journey!”
  • In a motivational context, someone might say, “Don’t give up, keep the journey towards your goals!”
  • A coach might encourage their team by saying, “We’ve faced challenges before, but let’s keep the journey and push through!”

62. Keep the voyage

This phrase is used to encourage someone to continue their exploration or adventure, similar to “keep the journey”.

  • For instance, someone might say, “You’ve seen so much, keep the voyage!”
  • In a travel context, a fellow traveler might say, “Don’t stop now, keep the voyage and discover new places!”
  • A guide might motivate their group by saying, “Our journey is not over, let’s keep the voyage and see what awaits us!”

63. Keep the adventure

Similar to “keep the journey” and “keep the voyage”, this phrase is used to encourage someone to continue their exciting or daring experience.

  • For example, a friend might say, “You’re living life to the fullest, keep the adventure!”
  • In an outdoor activity context, someone might say, “Don’t let fear hold you back, keep the adventure and enjoy the thrill!”
  • An adrenaline junkie might say, “Every day is a new adventure, so let’s keep the adventure going!”

64. Keep the exploration

Similar to the previous phrases, “keep the exploration” is used to encourage someone to continue their process of discovering or investigating something.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “You’re asking great questions, keep the exploration!”
  • In a scientific context, a researcher might say, “There’s still so much to uncover, keep the exploration of this topic!”
  • A curious individual might say, “The world is full of wonders, so let’s keep the exploration and learn something new every day!”

65. Keep the discovery

Similar to “keep the exploration”, this phrase is used to encourage someone to continue their process of finding or uncovering something.

  • For example, a mentor might say, “You’re making great progress, keep the discovery!”
  • In a creative context, someone might say, “Don’t limit yourself, keep the discovery of new ideas and possibilities!”
  • A scientist might say, “Every experiment is a step towards new discoveries, so let’s keep the discovery and push the boundaries of knowledge!”

66. Keep the search

This phrase is used to encourage someone to continue searching for something or someone. It implies that the search should not be abandoned and that the person should persist in their efforts.

  • For example, if someone is looking for a lost item, you might say, “Don’t give up! Keep the search.”
  • In a job search, someone might say, “Keep the search and you’ll find the right opportunity.”
  • A detective investigating a case might tell their team, “We need to keep the search until we find the missing evidence.”

67. Keep the hunt

This phrase is used to encourage someone to continue pursuing a goal or objective. It implies that the person should not give up and should persist in their efforts to achieve what they want.

  • For instance, if someone is trying to land a job, you might say, “Keep the hunt and you’ll find the right position.”
  • In a competitive sport, a coach might say, “Keep the hunt and give it your all in the next game.”
  • A person trying to achieve a personal goal might remind themselves, “I need to keep the hunt and stay focused on my dreams.”

68. Keep the pursuit

This phrase is used to encourage someone to continue chasing after something or someone. It implies that the person should not give up and should persist in their efforts to reach their target.

  • For example, if someone is pursuing a romantic interest, you might say, “Don’t give up! Keep the pursuit.”
  • In a competitive race, a coach might say, “Keep the pursuit and push yourself to the finish line.”
  • A person striving for success might remind themselves, “I need to keep the pursuit and never settle for mediocrity.”
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