Top 36 Slang For Foreign – Meaning & Usage

Exploring slang from different countries can be a fun and eye-opening experience, offering a glimpse into the unique language and culture of a foreign land. Join us as we uncover some of the most intriguing and amusing slang terms from around the globe, providing you with a fresh perspective on how language evolves and shapes the way we communicate. Get ready to broaden your linguistic horizons and impress your friends with your newfound knowledge of Slang For Foreign!

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1. Furriner

This term is used to refer to someone who is from a different country or culture. It is often used in a playful or joking manner.

  • For example, “I met this furriner at the party last night. He had the most interesting accent.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might say, “I love exploring new countries and meeting furriners.”
  • A person talking about their diverse group of friends might say, “I have friends from all over the world, a real mix of furriners.”

2. Outlander

This word also refers to someone who is from a different country or culture. It is often used to describe someone who is unfamiliar with the local customs or traditions.

  • For instance, “As an outlander, I had to learn the local language and adapt to the new culture.”
  • In a discussion about cultural differences, someone might say, “Being an outlander can be both exciting and challenging.”
  • A person talking about their experience living abroad might say, “I consider myself an outlander in the country I now call home.”

3. Alien

This term is used to describe someone who is not a citizen or national of the country they are in. It can also refer to someone who is unfamiliar or different.

  • For example, “As an alien in this country, I have to carry my documents with me at all times.”
  • In a conversation about immigration, someone might say, “Undocumented aliens face many challenges and obstacles.”
  • A person talking about their experience living in a new country might say, “I felt like an alien at first, but now I’ve found my place.”

4. Expat

This term refers to someone who is living in a country other than their own, usually for work or personal reasons. It is often used to describe someone who has chosen to live abroad.

  • For instance, “As an expat, I have the opportunity to experience a different culture and way of life.”
  • In a discussion about moving abroad, someone might say, “Becoming an expat can be both exciting and challenging.”
  • A person talking about their experience as an expat might say, “I’ve made so many friends in my expat community.”

5. Immigrant

This term is used to describe someone who has permanently moved to a new country to live and work. It is often used to refer to someone who has gone through the immigration process.

  • For example, “As an immigrant, I had to learn the language and adapt to a new culture.”
  • In a conversation about diversity, someone might say, “Immigrants bring so much richness to our society.”
  • A person talking about their experience as an immigrant might say, “I’m proud to call this country my new home.”

6. Foreign national

This term refers to a person who is a citizen of a country other than the one they are currently in. It is often used in legal and official contexts.

  • For example, “The new immigration law applies to both foreign nationals and permanent residents.”
  • A news article might mention, “The foreign national was arrested for illegal entry.”
  • In a discussion about international relations, someone might say, “We need to consider the impact of this policy on foreign nationals living in our country.”

7. Foreigner

This word is used to describe someone who is from a different country than the one they are currently in. It can be used in both formal and informal settings.

  • For instance, “The city attracts a large number of tourists, so you’ll often see foreigners walking around.”
  • In a conversation about cultural differences, someone might say, “As a foreigner, I had to adjust to the local customs.”
  • A traveler might write in a blog post, “I love exploring new countries and meeting fellow foreigners along the way.”

8. Foreign-born

This term is used to describe someone who was born in a country different from the one they currently reside in. It is often used in discussions about immigration and nationality.

  • For example, “The foreign-born population in the United States has been steadily increasing.”
  • In a conversation about identity, someone might say, “As a foreign-born individual, I have a unique perspective on cultural integration.”
  • A news article might mention, “The new policy aims to support the integration of foreign-born residents into society.”

9. Foreignerino

This is a playful and informal term used to refer to a foreigner. It is often used in a lighthearted or joking manner.

  • For instance, “Look at that foreignerino trying to order food in the local language.”
  • In a conversation among friends, someone might say, “We need to show our foreignerino friend the best spots in town.”
  • A comedian might use the term in a stand-up routine, saying, “As a foreignerino, I often find myself in hilarious cultural misunderstandings.”

10. Non-native

This term is used to describe someone who is not a native or citizen of a particular country. It is often used in discussions about language proficiency and cultural identity.

  • For example, “The language school offers courses for non-native speakers.”
  • In a conversation about accents, someone might say, “As a non-native English speaker, I still have a slight accent.”
  • A job advertisement might state, “We are looking for a non-native speaker to provide a fresh perspective on our international team.”

11. Foreignerette

– For instance, someone might say, “Look at that foreignerette over there, she’s got a great sense of style!”

  • In a conversation about cultural diversity, one might comment, “I love meeting new people, especially foreignerettes who bring different perspectives.”
  • A traveler might say, “I met a lovely foreignerette at a café and we ended up exploring the city together.”

12. Foreignerling

– For example, someone might say, “He’s just a foreignerling, he’ll get used to our customs eventually.”

  • In a discussion about language barriers, one might mention, “Foreignerlings often struggle with understanding the local slang.”
  • A local resident might offer assistance to a foreignerling by saying, “If you need any help navigating the city, just ask. We’re used to foreignerlings around here.”

13. Foreignerito

– For instance, someone might say, “Look at that little foreignerito trying to order food in the local language.”

  • In a conversation about cultural exchange, one might comment, “Foreigneritos bring such a fresh perspective to our community.”
  • A parent might say, “My child made friends with a foreignerito at school, and they’re learning so much from each other.”

14. Foreignerita

– For example, someone might say, “She’s a foreignerita with a great sense of humor, we always have a good time together.”

  • In a discussion about cultural diversity, one might comment, “Foreigneritas bring unique perspectives that enrich our community.”
  • A traveler might say, “I met a talented foreignerita who is an amazing artist, and we’ve become great friends.”

15. Foreignerific

– For instance, someone might say, “I had a foreignerific experience during my trip to Japan, the food and culture were incredible.”

  • In a conversation about international cuisine, one might comment, “This restaurant has a foreignerific menu with dishes from around the world.”
  • A person might describe a foreigner they admire by saying, “She’s a foreignerific dancer, her performances are captivating.”

16. Farang

This term is commonly used in Thailand to refer to Western foreigners. It can be used both neutrally and derogatorily, depending on the context.

  • For example, a Thai person might say, “There are many farangs living in Bangkok.”
  • In a discussion about cultural differences, someone might mention, “Farangs often find Thai food too spicy.”
  • However, it can also be used in a negative way, such as “Some locals resent the presence of farangs in their country.”

17. Ausländer

This word is used in German to refer to a foreigner or someone from another country. It is a neutral term and can be used in both formal and informal settings.

  • For instance, a German person might say, “There’s a large community of Ausländer in Berlin.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might ask, “How do Ausländer find living in Germany?”
  • It can also be used in a more general sense, such as “I love meeting Ausländer and learning about their cultures.”

18. Gweilo

This term is commonly used in Hong Kong and other Cantonese-speaking regions to refer to white foreigners. It can be used both neutrally and derogatorily, depending on the context.

  • For example, a local might say, “There are many gweilos working in the financial district.”
  • In a discussion about cultural diversity, someone might mention, “Gweilos often stand out in a crowd in Hong Kong.”
  • However, it can also be used in a negative way, such as “Some locals use gweilo as a racial slur.”

19. Tourist

This term refers to someone who is traveling to a different place for recreational purposes. It is a neutral term and can be used to describe anyone who is visiting a place that is not their home.

  • For instance, a person might say, “There are many tourists visiting the famous landmarks in Paris.”
  • In a conversation about travel experiences, someone might ask, “Have you ever been mistaken for a tourist?”
  • It can also be used in a more general sense, such as “The city relies heavily on tourism for its economy.”

20. Aliens

This term is used to describe people who are from a different country or culture. It is a neutral term and can be used to refer to anyone who is not a citizen of the country they are in.

  • For example, someone might say, “The city has a large population of aliens from different parts of the world.”
  • In a discussion about immigration, someone might mention, “The government has implemented stricter policies to control the influx of aliens.”
  • It can also be used in a more general sense, such as “The neighborhood is known for its diversity, with aliens from all walks of life.”

21. Guiri

This term is commonly used in Spain to refer to tourists, particularly those from Western Europe. It can have a slightly negative connotation and is often used to describe tourists who are seen as ignorant or behaving inappropriately.

  • For example, a local might say, “The streets are full of guiris during the summer.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might mention, “I felt like such a guiri when I couldn’t figure out the subway system.”
  • A tourist might ask, “Is it true that guiris are always targeted by pickpockets?”

22. Laowai

In China, “laowai” is a term used to refer to foreigners or non-Chinese people. It is a colloquial term and can be used in a neutral or derogatory manner depending on the context.

  • For instance, someone might say, “There are many laowai living in this city.”
  • In a discussion about cultural differences, a person might mention, “As a laowai, I had to get used to the local customs.”
  • A foreigner might ask, “Why do some locals stare at me and call me laowai?”

23. Bule

This term is commonly used in Indonesia to refer to foreigners or non-Indonesian people. It is a casual term and can be used in a neutral or friendly manner, although it can also be used in a derogatory way.

  • For example, someone might say, “There are many bule tourists in Bali.”
  • In a conversation about travel experiences, a person might share, “As a bule, I was often approached by locals trying to sell me things.”
  • A foreigner living in Indonesia might ask, “Is it offensive to be called a bule?”

24. Mzungu

In East Africa, particularly in Kenya and Tanzania, “mzungu” is a term used to refer to white people or foreigners. It is a casual term and can be used in a neutral or friendly manner, although it can also be used in a derogatory way.

  • For instance, a local might say, “There are many mzungus volunteering in this village.”
  • In a discussion about cultural experiences, a person might mention, “As a mzungu, I stood out wherever I went.”
  • A white person living in East Africa might ask, “Why do people keep calling me mzungu?”

25. Kwai lo

This term is commonly used in Hong Kong to refer to Westerners or non-Chinese people. It is a colloquial term and can be used in a neutral or friendly manner, although it can also be used in a derogatory way.

  • For example, someone might say, “There are many kwai los working in the financial district.”
  • In a conversation about cultural differences, a person might share, “As a kwai lo, I had to adapt to the local customs.”
  • A foreigner living in Hong Kong might ask, “Is it considered offensive to be called a kwai lo?”

26. Yabancı

This is a Turkish slang term for a foreigner. It is often used to refer to someone who is not from Turkey.

  • For example, a Turkish person might say, “The yabancı at the hotel asked me for directions.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might ask, “Have you ever been mistaken for a yabancı in a foreign country?”
  • A person discussing cultural differences might note, “It can be challenging for a yabancı to adapt to a new country and its customs.”

27. Barbarian

This term is used to describe someone from a different culture or civilization who is seen as lacking refinement or sophistication. It can be considered derogatory and offensive.

  • For instance, in a historical context, one might refer to ancient tribes as barbarians.
  • In a discussion about cultural stereotypes, someone might say, “Some people still view foreigners as barbarians.”
  • A person discussing cultural diversity might argue, “The concept of barbarians is outdated and promotes prejudice.”

28. Waeguk

This is a Korean slang term for a foreigner. It can be used to refer to someone who is not from Korea.

  • For example, a Korean person might say, “There are many waeguks studying at my university.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might ask, “Have you ever been mistaken for a waeguk in Korea?”
  • A person discussing cultural exchange might note, “Living as a waeguk in Korea has taught me so much about their customs and traditions.”

29. Ajnabi

This is an Arabic slang term for a stranger or foreigner. It can be used to refer to someone who is not from the Arab world.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I felt like an ajnabi when I first arrived in the country.”
  • In a discussion about cultural assimilation, one might ask, “How long does it take to stop feeling like an ajnabi in a new country?”
  • A person discussing language barriers might note, “As an ajnabi, it can be challenging to communicate with the locals.”

30. Videshi

This is a Hindi slang term for a foreigner. It is often used to refer to someone who is not from India.

  • For example, an Indian person might say, “I met a videshi at the tourist attraction.”
  • In a conversation about cultural differences, someone might ask, “What aspects of Indian culture do you find most surprising as a videshi?”
  • A person discussing travel experiences might note, “Being a videshi in India has exposed me to a whole new world of flavors and traditions.”

31. Uitlander

This term is derived from Afrikaans and was historically used in South Africa during the late 19th and early 20th centuries to refer to foreigners, specifically non-Dutch or non-Boer individuals. It carries a connotation of being an outsider or foreigner within the country.

  • For example, during the apartheid era, black South Africans might refer to white individuals as “uitlanders.”
  • In a discussion about immigration, someone might say, “As an uitlander living in a foreign country, I understand the challenges of adapting to a new culture.”
  • A person sharing their experience of studying abroad might mention, “Being an uitlander in a different country opened my eyes to new perspectives and ways of life.”

32. Uppity

This term is often used to describe someone who is perceived as being arrogant, snobbish, or acting superior to others. It can carry a racial connotation when used to describe a member of a marginalized or minority group who is seen as “getting above their station.”

  • For instance, a person might say, “She’s always acting uppity, like she’s better than everyone else.”
  • In a discussion about social class, someone might comment, “People who come from privileged backgrounds often display uppity behavior.”
  • A person sharing their experience of encountering snobbish behavior might say, “I can’t stand when people act uppity and look down on others.”

33. Outsider

This term refers to someone who is not part of a particular group or community, often implying that they are not fully accepted or understood by the group. It can also be used to describe someone who is new to a specific environment or who feels disconnected from their surroundings.

  • For example, a person might say, “As an outsider, it took me some time to adjust to the customs and traditions of this foreign country.”
  • In a discussion about cliques in high school, someone might comment, “Being an outsider can be tough, especially when you’re trying to fit in.”
  • A person sharing their experience of moving to a new city might mention, “Feeling like an outsider in a new place can be challenging, but it also offers opportunities for personal growth and self-discovery.”

34. Foreign devil

This term is often used in East Asian countries, particularly China, to refer to foreigners. It can carry a negative or derogatory connotation, suggesting that foreigners are outsiders or even evil.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Beware of those foreign devils, they’re only here to exploit our resources.”
  • In a discussion about cultural misunderstandings, a person might comment, “Being called a foreign devil made me realize the stereotypes and biases some people hold against foreigners.”
  • A person sharing their experience of living abroad might mention, “I faced discrimination and prejudice as a foreign devil in a country where I didn’t look like the majority.”

35. Mat Salleh

This term is commonly used in Malaysia to refer to white individuals, specifically those of European descent. It is derived from the Malay language and can carry a neutral or slightly derogatory connotation, depending on the context.

  • For example, a person might say, “I saw a group of mat salleh tourists exploring the local market.”
  • In a discussion about racial diversity, someone might comment, “Even though I’m a mat salleh, I strive to learn about and respect the local culture.”
  • A person sharing their experience of being called a mat salleh might mention, “At first, I didn’t understand why people were using that term, but I learned that it’s a common way to refer to white foreigners in Malaysia.”

36. Ferengi

This slang term originates from the TV show “Star Trek” and refers to an alien species known for their greed and business acumen. It is often used to describe someone who is obsessed with money or overly focused on profit.

  • For example, “He’s always trying to make a deal, he’s such a Ferengi.”
  • In a conversation about capitalism, someone might say, “The Ferengi are the epitome of a profit-driven society.”
  • Another usage could be, “Don’t be such a Ferengi, money isn’t everything.”
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