Top 25 Slang For Frantic – Meaning & Usage

When things get hectic and chaotic, it can be hard to find the right words to express that feeling of urgency and frenzy. But fear not, we’ve got you covered with the top slang for frantic. Whether you’re feeling overwhelmed or just need a fun way to describe the craziness of life, this listicle is sure to have you covered. So buckle up and get ready to add some new vocabulary to your arsenal!

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1. Panicked

When someone is panicked, they are in a state of extreme distress or fear.

  • For example, “She panicked when she realized she left her phone at home.”
  • In a dangerous situation, someone might shout, “Don’t panic, we’ll find a way out!”
  • A person might describe their reaction to a scary movie as, “I was so panicked, I couldn’t sleep.”

2. Frenzied

When someone is frenzied, they are in a state of wild excitement or frenzy, often characterized by rapid and chaotic movement or activity.

  • For instance, “The crowd became frenzied when their favorite band took the stage.”
  • In a busy kitchen, a chef might be described as “working in a frenzied state.”
  • A person might say, “I was so frenzied trying to finish my project on time.”

3. Hysterical

When someone is hysterical, they are feeling or showing uncontrollable extreme emotion, often characterized by excessive laughter, crying, or panic.

  • For example, “The news of her promotion made her hysterical with joy.”
  • In a tense situation, someone might become hysterical and start screaming.
  • A person might describe a comedian’s performance as “hysterical” when they can’t stop laughing.

4. Freaking out

When someone is freaking out, they are becoming extremely anxious or upset, often due to a stressful or overwhelming situation.

  • For instance, “She’s freaking out because she lost her keys.”
  • In a scary movie, a character might start freaking out when they see a ghost.
  • A person might say, “I’m freaking out because I have a big exam tomorrow and I haven’t studied.”

5. Spazzing

When someone is spazzing, they are engaging in erratic or uncontrolled behavior, often characterized by sudden and exaggerated movements or reactions.

  • For example, “He was spazzing out on the dance floor, moving in wild and unpredictable ways.”
  • In a stressful situation, someone might start spazzing and making irrational decisions.
  • A person might say, “I was spazzing out when I realized I forgot to submit my assignment.”

6. Wigging out

To “wig out” means to become extremely anxious, stressed, or panicked about something.

  • For example, “I’m totally wigging out about this big presentation tomorrow.”
  • Someone might say, “She started wigging out when she realized she lost her phone.”
  • A friend might ask, “Why are you wigging out? It’s not that big of a deal.”

7. Flipping out

To “flip out” means to lose control of your emotions or behavior, often in an extreme or irrational way.

  • For instance, “He completely flipped out when he found out he didn’t get the job.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t believe she flipped out over such a small mistake.”
  • A parent might warn their child, “If you don’t clean your room, I’m going to flip out!”

8. Losing it

To “lose it” means to become overwhelmed by emotions or stress, often resulting in a loss of control or composure.

  • For example, “I’m so stressed, I feel like I’m losing it.”
  • Someone might say, “He started yelling and throwing things, he completely lost it.”
  • A person might admit, “I’m on the verge of losing it. I need a break.”

9. Going bonkers

To “go bonkers” means to become extremely agitated, irrational, or crazy.

  • For instance, “The crowd went bonkers when their team scored a goal.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t handle this, I’m going bonkers.”
  • A friend might ask, “Why are you going bonkers over such a small issue?”

10. Going nuts

To “go nuts” means to become extremely excited, agitated, or irrational about something.

  • For example, “The kids went nuts when they heard they were going to Disneyland.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m so stressed, I feel like I’m going nuts.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I’m going nuts waiting for the concert to start!”

11. Going bananas

This phrase is used to describe someone who is behaving in a wild or irrational manner due to extreme frustration, anger, or excitement.

  • For example, “When she found out she won the lottery, she went bananas and started jumping up and down.”
  • In a stressful situation, someone might say, “I’ve been working on this project for hours and I’m going bananas!”
  • Another might exclaim, “The kids are driving me crazy! They’re running around the house and going bananas!”

12. Going haywire

This phrase is used to describe a situation or person that is becoming disorganized, chaotic, or malfunctioning.

  • For instance, “The computer system went haywire and crashed, causing a lot of frustration.”
  • When a plan falls apart, someone might say, “Everything was going smoothly, but then it all went haywire.”
  • Another might exclaim, “The party was supposed to be a small gathering, but it quickly went haywire and turned into a wild event!”

13. Going berserk

This phrase is used to describe someone who is behaving in an extremely violent or aggressive manner, often due to anger or frustration.

  • For example, “The player went berserk and started attacking the referee after being given a red card.”
  • When someone loses their temper, they might say, “I was so angry, I just went berserk and started throwing things.”
  • Another might exclaim, “The dog went berserk when the mailman came to the door, barking and growling uncontrollably.”

14. Going ballistic

This phrase is used to describe someone who is becoming extremely angry, agitated, or out of control.

  • For instance, “When he found out his car was stolen, he went ballistic and started yelling.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “She went ballistic and started throwing things at me.”
  • Another might exclaim, “The boss went ballistic when he saw the mistake in the report, yelling at everyone in the office.”

15. Going postal

This phrase is used to describe someone who becomes extremely angry, agitated, or violent, often in a workplace setting.

  • For example, “After being fired, he went postal and started threatening his former coworkers.”
  • When someone becomes uncontrollably angry, they might say, “I was so frustrated, I almost went postal.”
  • Another might exclaim, “The stress of the job was getting to him, and he was always on the verge of going postal.”

16. Going off the rails

This phrase means to become uncontrollable or behave in an irrational or erratic manner. It can refer to someone who is experiencing a state of panic or extreme stress.

  • For example, “After the breakup, he started going off the rails and making impulsive decisions.”
  • In a work setting, someone might say, “The project is behind schedule and the team is going off the rails trying to catch up.”
  • A friend might express concern by saying, “I’m worried about her. She’s been going off the rails lately.”

17. Going off the deep end

This expression means to become mentally unstable or overly emotional. It implies that someone has reached a point of no return and has lost touch with reality.

  • For instance, “He couldn’t handle the stress anymore and went off the deep end.”
  • When discussing someone’s erratic behavior, one might say, “She’s been acting strange lately, like she’s going off the deep end.”
  • A person might express their own feelings by saying, “I feel like I’m going off the deep end with all this pressure.”

18. Going crazy

This phrase is a simple way to describe someone who is losing control of their thoughts or emotions. It can be used to indicate a state of extreme anxiety, panic, or irrational behavior.

  • For example, “The constant noise was driving him crazy.”
  • When discussing a hectic schedule, one might say, “I’m going crazy trying to juggle work and personal life.”
  • A person might express frustration by saying, “I can’t find my keys anywhere, I’m going crazy!”

19. Going mental

This slang phrase means to become extremely upset or agitated. It suggests that someone is experiencing a heightened level of emotional distress.

  • For instance, “She went mental when she found out he had lied to her.”
  • When describing a person’s outburst, one might say, “He completely went mental and started yelling at everyone.”
  • A friend might express concern by saying, “I’m worried about him, he’s been going mental over every little thing lately.”

20. Going apeshit

This phrase means to become extremely angry or agitated to the point of losing control. It implies a wild and irrational reaction to a situation.

  • For example, “When she found out about the betrayal, she went apeshit.”
  • When describing a person’s explosive behavior, one might say, “He went apeshit and started throwing things.”
  • A person might express their own frustration by saying, “I’m going apeshit trying to meet all these deadlines.”

21. Going ham

This slang term means to go all out or put in maximum effort. It is often used to describe someone who is acting in a frantic or intense manner.

  • For example, “She’s going ham on her workout at the gym.”
  • A person might say, “I have a deadline tomorrow, so I need to go ham on this project.”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “He’s going ham on the basketball court tonight.”

22. Frazzled

To be frazzled means to be completely overwhelmed or in a state of extreme stress. It is often used to describe someone who is feeling frantic or disorganized.

  • For instance, “She’s so frazzled from all the work she has to do.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling frazzled trying to juggle work and family responsibilities.”
  • In a busy office, a coworker might comment, “Everyone seems so frazzled today.”

23. Having a meltdown

To have a meltdown means to lose control of your emotions or behavior, often in a frantic or panicked way. It is often used to describe someone who is overwhelmed or unable to cope with a situation.

  • For example, “She’s having a meltdown because her computer crashed.”
  • A parent might say, “My toddler had a meltdown in the grocery store.”
  • In a high-pressure situation, a person might comment, “I can’t handle this stress anymore, I’m having a meltdown.”

24. Having a conniption

To have a conniption means to throw a fit or have an extreme emotional reaction, usually in a frantic or agitated manner. It is often used to describe someone who is angry, upset, or overreacting.

  • For instance, “He had a conniption when he found out his flight was delayed.”
  • A person might say, “My boss had a conniption when she saw the mistake in the report.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might accuse the other person of “having a conniption.”

25. Having a cow

To have a cow means to get upset or overreact to a situation, often in a frantic or exaggerated manner. It is often used to describe someone who is easily agitated or prone to overreacting.

  • For example, “She had a cow when she saw the mess in the kitchen.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t have a cow, it’s just a small mistake.”
  • In a tense situation, someone might comment, “He’s having a cow over something so trivial.”
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