Top 65 Slang For French – Meaning & Usage

French, known for its romantic allure and rich cultural heritage, has a language that is constantly evolving with the times. From street slang to internet jargon, there are countless slang words and phrases that add a unique flavor to the language. Whether you’re planning a trip to Paris or simply want to impress your friends, we’ve got you covered. In this listicle, we’ve gathered the top French slang that will have you speaking like a local in no time. So, get ready to add a touch of je ne sais quoi to your vocabulary!

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1. Bouffer

This slang term is used to describe the act of eating. It is a casual and informal way of saying “to eat” in French.

  • For example, “Je vais bouffer une pizza ce soir” (I’m going to eat a pizza tonight).
  • In a conversation about food, someone might say, “J’ai trop bouffé à la fête hier soir” (I ate too much at the party last night).
  • A friend might ask, “Tu veux bouffer quoi ce midi ?” (What do you want to eat for lunch?).

2. Un truc

This slang term is used to refer to an unspecified or unknown object or thing. It is a versatile term that can be used in various contexts.

  • For instance, “J’ai oublié mon truc à la maison” (I forgot my thing at home).
  • In a conversation about a lost item, someone might say, “J’ai perdu mon truc quelque part” (I lost my thing somewhere).
  • A friend might ask, “Tu as vu mon truc quelque part ?” (Have you seen my thing anywhere?).

3. Chouette

This slang term is used to express something positive or cool. It is an informal way of saying “cool” in French.

  • For example, “Ce film est vraiment chouette” (This movie is really cool).
  • In a conversation about a fun event, someone might say, “C’était une soirée chouette” (It was a cool evening).
  • A friend might exclaim, “Chouette, on va passer des vacances ensemble !” (Cool, we’re going on vacation together!).

4. Piquer

This slang term is used to describe the act of stealing. It is a colloquial and informal way of saying “to steal” in French.

  • For instance, “Il m’a piqué mon téléphone” (He stole my phone).
  • In a conversation about a stolen item, someone might say, “On m’a piqué mon sac à dos” (Someone stole my backpack).
  • A friend might ask, “Tu piques souvent des bonbons dans le magasin ?” (Do you often steal candies from the store?).

5. Bosser

This slang term is used to describe the act of working. It is a casual and informal way of saying “to work” in French.

  • For example, “Je dois bosser ce week-end” (I have to work this weekend).
  • In a conversation about a busy schedule, someone might say, “Je bosse beaucoup en ce moment” (I’m working a lot at the moment).
  • A friend might ask, “Tu bosses dans quel domaine ?” (What field do you work in?).

6. Ça baigne ? Ça baigne !

This slang phrase is used to ask someone how they are doing and to respond positively. It is similar to asking “How’s it going?” and responding with “It’s going well!”

  • For example, you might greet a friend by saying, “Ça baigne ?” and they might reply, “Ça baigne !”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Ça baigne ?” to check in on someone’s well-being and they might respond, “Ça baigne !”
  • When catching up with a friend, you might say, “Ça baigne ?” and they might reply, “Ça baigne ! Everything’s going great!”

7. Arrête de te la péter

This slang phrase is used to tell someone to stop showing off or acting superior. It is similar to saying “Stop bragging” or “Stop acting all high and mighty.”

  • For instance, if someone is constantly talking about their accomplishments, you might say, “Arrête de te la péter!”
  • In a group setting where someone is trying to dominate the conversation, you might say, “Arrête de te la péter! Let someone else speak.”
  • If someone is flaunting their expensive possessions, you might comment, “Arrête de te la péter! We get it, you’re rich.”

8. Je me casse

This slang phrase is used to express that you are leaving or that you are done with a situation. It is similar to saying “I’m outta here” or “I’m leaving.”

  • For example, if you’re at a party and you want to leave, you might say, “Je me casse.”
  • If you’re tired of a boring conversation, you might say, “Je me casse” to indicate that you’re done talking.
  • When ending a phone call, you might say, “Je me casse” to let the other person know you’re hanging up.

9. Il capte rien

This slang phrase is used to say that someone doesn’t understand something. It is similar to saying “He doesn’t get it” or “He doesn’t get what’s going on.”

  • For instance, if someone is confused about a joke, you might say, “Il capte rien.”
  • In a group discussion where someone is not understanding the topic, you might comment, “Il capte rien. We need to explain it again.”
  • If someone is struggling to follow instructions, you might say, “Il capte rien. We should break it down for him.”

10. Laisse tomber

This slang phrase is used to tell someone to forget about something or to let it go. It is similar to saying “Forget it” or “Never mind.”

  • For example, if someone suggests a plan that you’re not interested in, you might say, “Laisse tomber.”
  • If someone is trying to argue with you and you don’t want to continue the discussion, you might say, “Laisse tomber. It’s not worth it.”
  • When someone brings up a past mistake, you might say, “Laisse tomber. It’s in the past.”

11. J’ai la flemme

This phrase is used to express laziness or a lack of motivation to do something. It is equivalent to saying “I can’t be bothered” or “I’m lazy” in English.

  • For example, “J’ai la flemme de faire mes devoirs” means “I can’t be bothered to do my homework.”
  • In a conversation about chores, someone might say, “J’ai la flemme de faire la vaisselle” which means “I’m too lazy to do the dishes.”
  • A person might use this phrase to decline an invitation, saying “J’ai la flemme de sortir ce soir” which translates to “I can’t be bothered to go out tonight.”

12. Sans déc

This slang phrase is used to express surprise or disbelief. It is similar to saying “No kidding” or “For real” in English.

  • For instance, if someone tells you an incredible story, you might respond with “Sans déc?” to convey your surprise.
  • In a conversation about an unexpected event, someone might exclaim “Sans déc!” to express their disbelief.
  • A person might use this phrase to confirm the truth of something, saying “C’est vrai, sans déc!” which means “It’s true, for real!”

13. Parler comme une vache espagnole

This phrase is used to describe someone who speaks French poorly or with a heavy accent. It can be translated to “to speak French like a Spanish cow” in English.

  • For example, if someone struggles to communicate in French, you might jokingly say “Il parle comme une vache espagnole” which means “He speaks French like a Spanish cow.”
  • In a conversation about language skills, someone might say “Je parle français, mais comme une vache espagnole” which translates to “I speak French, but like a Spanish cow.”
  • A person might use this phrase to describe their own language abilities, saying “Je ne parle pas français, je parle comme une vache espagnole” which means “I don’t speak French, I speak like a Spanish cow.”

14. J’ai un petit creux

This phrase is used to express mild hunger. It can be translated to “I have a little hollow” or “I’m a little hungry” in English.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you want to grab a snack, you might respond with “J’ai un petit creux” to indicate that you’re a little hungry.
  • In a conversation about meal times, someone might say “J’ai toujours un petit creux à midi” which means “I always get a little hungry at noon.”
  • A person might use this phrase to suggest getting a light snack, saying “On pourrait prendre un petit goûter, j’ai un petit creux” which translates to “We could have a little snack, I’m a little hungry.”

15. Quoi

This word is used as a slang expression to convey confusion, surprise, or to ask for clarification. It can be translated to “What” or “Excuse me” in English.

  • For example, if someone says something you didn’t understand, you might respond with a simple “Quoi?” to ask for clarification.
  • In a conversation about a surprising statement, someone might exclaim “Quoi!” to express their surprise.
  • A person might use this word to get someone’s attention, saying “Quoi!” to mean “Excuse me!”

16. Être dans le coaltar

This expression is used to describe being in a tough or challenging situation. It can refer to various aspects of life such as work, relationships, or personal circumstances.

  • For example, “Depuis qu’il a perdu son emploi, il est dans le coaltar” (Since he lost his job, he’s been in a difficult situation).
  • Another usage could be, “Je suis dans le coaltar avec mes études en ce moment” (I’m in a difficult situation with my studies right now).
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17. Partir en piste

This phrase is used to describe leaving or starting a journey. It can be used in various contexts, such as going on a trip, starting a new adventure, or simply leaving a place.

  • For instance, “On part en piste demain matin pour nos vacances” (We’re hitting the road tomorrow morning for our vacation).
  • Another example could be, “C’est l’heure de partir en piste et d’explorer le monde” (It’s time to hit the road and explore the world).

18. Finir sur la paille

This expression is used to describe a situation where someone ends up without money or financially struggling. It can refer to various circumstances, such as losing a job, making poor financial decisions, or experiencing a financial crisis.

  • For example, “Après avoir dépensé tout son argent, il a fini sur la paille” (After spending all his money, he ended up broke).
  • Another usage could be, “Si tu continues à dépenser ainsi, tu finiras sur la paille” (If you keep spending like this, you’ll end up broke).

19. Demander une rallonge

This phrase is used to describe requesting more time for a deadline or an additional allowance. It is often used in professional or academic settings when someone needs more time to complete a task or project.

  • For instance, “J’ai besoin de demander une rallonge pour rendre mon rapport” (I need to ask for an extension to submit my report).
  • Another example could be, “Je vais demander une rallonge pour terminer ce projet à temps” (I’m going to ask for an extension to finish this project on time).

20. Tirer les marrons du feu

This expression is used to describe someone who does the difficult or unpleasant tasks for others. It can imply being taken advantage of or doing someone else’s work without receiving proper recognition or compensation.

  • For example, “Il est toujours celui qui tire les marrons du feu pendant les projets de groupe” (He’s always the one who does the dirty work during group projects).
  • Another usage could be, “Arrête de tirer les marrons du feu pour les autres et pense à toi” (Stop doing the dirty work for others and think about yourself).

21. Poser une colle

This phrase is used when someone asks a difficult question or poses a challenging problem that is hard to answer or solve. It can also be used in a figurative sense to mean to confuse or perplex someone.

  • For example, “Il m’a posé une colle en me demandant de résoudre cette énigme.” (He stumped me by asking me to solve this riddle.)
  • In a classroom setting, a teacher might say, “Je vais vous poser une colle pour tester vos connaissances.” (I’m going to stump you to test your knowledge.)
  • A friend might challenge you with a difficult question and say, “Je vais te poser une colle, essaie de trouver la réponse.” (I’m going to stump you, try to find the answer.)

22. Vas-y mollo

This phrase is an informal way to tell someone to slow down or take things easy. It can be used in various situations to advise someone to be less intense, less aggressive, or less rushed.

  • For instance, “Je suis fatigué, je vais y aller mollo aujourd’hui.” (I’m tired, I’m going to take it easy today.)
  • When giving driving directions, someone might say, “Prends cette route, mais vas-y mollo dans les virages.” (Take this road, but take it easy on the turns.)
  • A friend might say, “Tu travailles trop, tu devrais te détendre et y aller mollo.” (You work too much, you should relax and take it easy.)

23. Zoner

This verb is used to describe hanging out or spending time in a certain area without a specific purpose. It can also imply wandering or loitering around without a particular destination.

  • For example, “On va zoner au parc cet après-midi.” (We’re going to hang out at the park this afternoon.)
  • When discussing weekend plans, someone might say, “Je vais juste zoner en ville, je n’ai rien de prévu.” (I’m just going to hang out in the city, I have no plans.)
  • A teenager might ask their friend, “Tu veux zoner en centre-ville après l’école ?” (Do you want to hang out downtown after school?)

24. Filer un mauvais coton

This expression is used to describe someone who is engaging in negative or self-destructive behavior. It suggests that the person is heading down a bad path and may experience negative consequences as a result.

  • For instance, “Depuis qu’il a commencé à fréquenter ces mauvaises personnes, il file un mauvais coton.” (Since he started hanging out with those bad people, he’s been going down a bad path.)
  • When discussing a troubled youth, someone might say, “Il a toujours été rebelle et il file un mauvais coton depuis longtemps.” (He’s always been rebellious and he’s been going down a bad path for a long time.)
  • A concerned friend might say, “Je m’inquiète pour toi, j’ai l’impression que tu files un mauvais coton.” (I’m worried about you, I feel like you’re going down a bad path.)

25. En faire tout un fromage

This phrase is used to describe someone who is overreacting or making a big deal out of a situation that doesn’t warrant it. It implies that the person is exaggerating or blowing things out of proportion.

  • For example, “Ce n’est qu’une petite erreur, il ne faut pas en faire tout un fromage.” (It’s just a small mistake, there’s no need to make a big deal out of it.)
  • When someone gets upset over a minor inconvenience, someone might say, “Arrête d’en faire tout un fromage, ce n’est pas si grave.” (Stop making a big deal out of it, it’s not that serious.)
  • A parent might tell their child, “Ce n’est qu’un jouet cassé, ne t’en fais pas tout un fromage.” (It’s just a broken toy, don’t make a big deal out of it.)

26. Être affublé

This phrase is used to describe someone who is burdened or saddled with something undesirable or inconvenient.

  • For example, “Il est affublé d’une dette énorme” (He is burdened with a huge debt).
  • In a conversation about a difficult task, someone might say, “Je suis affublé de cette responsabilité” (I am burdened with this responsibility).
  • A person complaining about their job might say, “Je suis affublé de ce patron insupportable” (I am burdened with this unbearable boss).

27. BCBG

This term is an abbreviation for “Bon Chic Bon Genre,” which translates to “Good Style Good Class” in English. It refers to someone who is stylish and has an upper-class demeanor.

  • For instance, “Elle est toujours habillée en BCBG” (She is always dressed in a classy and stylish manner).
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “Le style BCBG est très en vogue” (The BCBG style is very trendy).
  • A person describing someone’s appearance might say, “Il a un air BCBG avec sa chemise et sa cravate” (He has a BCBG look with his shirt and tie).

28. Habillé comme la chienne à Jacques

This phrase is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is dressed in a sloppy or unkempt manner.

  • For example, “Regarde comment il est habillé comme la chienne à Jacques” (Look at how he is dressed like Jacques’ bitch).
  • In a conversation about someone’s appearance, one might say, “Elle est toujours habillée comme la chienne à Jacques” (She is always dressed like Jacques’ bitch).
  • A person criticizing someone’s fashion sense might say, “Il est vraiment mal habillé, on dirait la chienne à Jacques” (He is really poorly dressed, he looks like Jacques’ bitch).

29. Flambant neuf

This phrase is used to describe something that is brand new or in pristine condition.

  • For instance, “J’ai acheté une voiture flambant neuf” (I bought a brand new car).
  • In a conversation about a recently purchased item, someone might say, “Regarde, c’est flambant neuf” (Look, it’s brand new).
  • A person describing a newly built house might say, “La maison est flambant neuf, tout est impeccable” (The house is brand new, everything is impeccable).
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30. Faire des siennes

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that is causing trouble or misbehaving.

  • For example, “Les enfants font des siennes aujourd’hui” (The children are misbehaving today).
  • In a conversation about a malfunctioning device, someone might say, “Encore une fois, cette machine fait des siennes” (Once again, this machine is misbehaving).
  • A person complaining about a difficult situation might say, “La vie fait des siennes en ce moment” (Life is misbehaving at the moment).

31. Bordel

This word can be used to describe a chaotic or messy situation. It is often used to express frustration or disbelief.

  • For example, if someone’s plans fall apart, they might say, “C’est le bordel!” (It’s a mess!)
  • In a crowded and disorganized space, someone might comment, “Quel bordel!” (What a mess!)
  • When describing a situation that is out of control, someone might say, “Tout est parti en bordel!” (Everything turned into a mess!)

32. Balle

In slang, “balle” is used to refer to a unit of currency, specifically the euro. It is similar to using “buck” to refer to the dollar in English.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Ça coûte 10 balles” (It costs 10 euros).
  • When discussing the cost of something, someone might ask, “Combien ça fait en balles?” (How much is that in euros?)
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “J’ai besoin de 50 balles” (I need 50 euros).

33. Blé

This slang term is used to refer to money, specifically cash. It is similar to using “dough” or “bread” in English.

  • For example, someone might say, “Il a beaucoup de blé” (He has a lot of cash).
  • When discussing the cost of something, someone might ask, “Ça coûte combien en blé?” (How much does that cost in cash?)
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “J’ai besoin de blé” (I need cash).

34. BG

This abbreviation stands for “beau gosse” which translates to “good-looking” in English. It is often used to describe an attractive person.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Il est vraiment BG” (He is really good-looking).
  • When discussing someone’s appearance, a person might comment, “Elle est super BG” (She is really good-looking).
  • In a conversation about celebrity crushes, someone might say, “Brad Pitt est un vrai BG” (Brad Pitt is a true good-looking guy).

35. Baraque

This word is used to describe someone who is muscular or strong. It is similar to using “built” or “ripped” in English.

  • For example, someone might say, “Il est super baraque” (He is really muscular).
  • When discussing fitness goals, someone might say, “Je veux devenir baraque” (I want to become muscular).
  • In a conversation about physical appearance, someone might comment, “Il a des bras bien baraqués” (He has well-built arms).

36. Bobo

This term refers to a person who is both wealthy and bohemian, someone who enjoys a luxurious lifestyle while still embracing a free-spirited and artistic mindset. The term “bobo” is often used to describe a certain type of French urbanite.

  • For example, “She shops at high-end boutiques but also attends art gallery openings. She’s a true bobo.”
  • In a discussion about cultural trends, someone might say, “The bobo lifestyle is all about organic food and sustainable fashion.”
  • A person might jokingly refer to themselves as a bobo, saying, “I can’t resist a good farmers market and a glass of expensive wine. I guess I’m a bobo at heart.”

37. Baguette

A long, thin loaf of bread with a crispy crust and a soft interior. The term “baguette” specifically refers to this type of bread in French cuisine.

  • For instance, “I picked up a fresh baguette from the bakery for dinner.”
  • In a conversation about French cuisine, someone might mention, “You can’t have a proper French meal without a baguette.”
  • A person might say, “I love making sandwiches with a crusty baguette and fresh ingredients.”

38. Ooh la la

This phrase is used to express surprise, excitement, or admiration. It is often used in a playful or flirtatious manner.

  • For example, “Ooh la la, look at that stunning dress!”
  • In a conversation about a romantic encounter, someone might say, “We had a candlelit dinner and ooh la la, things got steamy.”
  • A person might exclaim, “Ooh la la, this dessert is absolutely delicious!”

39. Sacré bleu

This phrase is used to express surprise, disbelief, or frustration. It is a mild exclamation, similar to “oh my goodness” or “good grief” in English.

  • For instance, “Sacré bleu, I can’t believe I forgot my keys again!”
  • In a conversation about a shocking news article, someone might say, “Sacré bleu, I can’t believe that actually happened.”
  • A person might exclaim, “Sacré bleu, this traffic is unbearable!”

40. Croissant

A crescent-shaped pastry made with butter and typically enjoyed for breakfast or as a snack. The term “croissant” specifically refers to this type of pastry in French cuisine.

  • For example, “I had a delicious croissant with my coffee this morning.”
  • In a discussion about international cuisine, someone might say, “Croissants are a staple of French bakeries.”
  • A person might mention, “I love the flaky layers of a freshly baked croissant.”

41. C’est la vie

This phrase is used to express acceptance of a situation, especially when it is unfortunate or disappointing. It is often used to convey a sense of resignation or a philosophical attitude towards life’s ups and downs.

  • For example, if someone loses a job, they might say, “Well, c’est la vie.”
  • In a conversation about a failed relationship, someone might say, “We tried our best, but c’est la vie.”
  • When plans change unexpectedly, a person might shrug and say, “C’est la vie, things happen.”

42. Bon appétit

This phrase is used to wish someone a good meal or to encourage them to enjoy their food. It is commonly used before starting a meal or when serving food to others.

  • For instance, a host might say, “Bon appétit!” before guests start eating.
  • A person posting a picture of a delicious meal on social media might caption it, “Bon appétit, everyone!”
  • When dining out, a waiter might say, “Here’s your order, bon appétit!”

43. Voilà

This word is used to indicate the completion or presentation of something. It can be used to draw attention to something or to indicate that something has been accomplished or provided.

  • For example, when presenting a finished art piece, someone might say, “Voilà, my latest creation!”
  • A person handing over a gift might say, “Voilà, it’s for you.”
  • When solving a problem or completing a task, someone might say, “Voilà, all done!”

44. Merci beaucoup

This phrase is a polite way to express gratitude and appreciation. It is a more emphatic form of “merci” and is used when someone wants to convey a deeper level of thanks.

  • For instance, if someone helps you with a difficult task, you might say, “Merci beaucoup!”
  • When receiving a thoughtful gift, you might express your gratitude by saying, “Merci beaucoup, it’s lovely.”
  • A person might end a heartfelt thank-you note with “Merci beaucoup for everything you’ve done.”

45. Oh là là

This phrase is used to express surprise, astonishment, excitement, or sometimes even disappointment. It can be used in a positive or negative context, depending on the situation.

  • For example, if someone sees a beautiful sunset, they might exclaim, “Oh là là, look at that!”
  • In a conversation about a shocking event, someone might say, “Oh là là, I can’t believe it.”
  • When someone spills a drink, they might say, “Oh là là, what a mess!”

46. Voulez-vous

This phrase is a common way to ask someone if they want something. It is often used in a flirtatious or romantic context.

  • For example, a person might say, “Voulez-vous danser?” which means “Do you want to dance?”
  • In a restaurant, a server might ask, “Voulez-vous un dessert?” meaning “Do you want a dessert?”
  • A person might use this phrase to ask, “Voulez-vous partir avec moi ce soir?” which means “Do you want to leave with me tonight?”

47. Comme ci, comme ça

This phrase is used to express that something is just okay or mediocre. It can also be used to describe a person’s mood or state of being.

  • For instance, if someone asks how you’re feeling, you might respond, “Comme ci, comme ça,” meaning “So-so.”
  • If asked about a movie, you might say, “It was comme ci, comme ça,” indicating that it was neither good nor bad.
  • When describing a meal, you could say, “The food was comme ci, comme ça,” suggesting that it was average.

48. Vive la France

This phrase is used to express patriotism or a love for France. It is often used as a rallying cry or a way to show support for the country.

  • For example, during a sports event, fans might chant, “Vive la France!” to cheer on their national team.
  • When celebrating a French holiday, people might raise their glasses and toast, saying, “Vive la France!”
  • A person might use this phrase in a conversation about their heritage, saying, “Vive la France! I’m proud to be French.”

49. C’est magnifique

This phrase is used to describe something that is extremely beautiful, impressive, or awe-inspiring.

  • For instance, when visiting a famous landmark, a person might say, “C’est magnifique!” to express their admiration.
  • If someone sees a breathtaking view, they might exclaim, “C’est magnifique!”
  • When admiring a work of art, a person might comment, “C’est magnifique! The artist is truly talented.”

50. Quel bordel

This phrase is used to describe a chaotic or messy situation. It can also be used to express frustration or annoyance.

  • For example, if someone walks into a messy room, they might say, “Quel bordel!” to express their surprise or disapproval.
  • When experiencing a disorganized event, a person might comment, “C’est quel bordel!” indicating their frustration.
  • If someone is overwhelmed with work or tasks, they might exclaim, “Quel bordel! I don’t know where to start!”

51. Ça va

This is a common greeting in French that translates to “How are you?” or “How’s it going?” It is often used in casual conversations.

  • For example, you might say, “Salut! Ça va?” which means “Hi! How are you?”
  • When someone asks you how you’re doing, you can respond with “Ça va bien, merci!” which means “I’m doing well, thank you!”
  • In a more informal setting, you might hear someone say, “Ça va, tranquille” which means “It’s going, chill.”

52. Ça marche

This phrase is used to express agreement or understanding. It can be translated to “Sounds good” or “Okay” in English.

  • For instance, if someone suggests a plan, you can respond with “Ça marche” to indicate that you agree or are on board.
  • When confirming a meeting time, you might say “On se voit à 18h, ça marche?” which means “We’ll meet at 6pm, sounds good?”
  • If someone asks if a certain solution works for you, you can reply with “Ça marche pour moi” which means “It works for me.”

53. Ça suffit

This phrase is used to indicate that something is sufficient or that you’ve had enough of something. It can be translated to “That’s enough” or “That’ll do” in English.

  • For example, if someone keeps teasing you, you can say “Ça suffit!” to tell them to stop.
  • When serving food, you might say “Ça suffit” to indicate that the portion is enough.
  • If someone keeps talking and you want them to stop, you can say “Ça suffit, j’en ai marre” which means “That’s enough, I’ve had enough.”

54. Pas de problème

This phrase is used to express that there is no problem or difficulty. It can be translated to “No problem” or “No worries” in English.

  • For instance, if someone thanks you for something, you can reply with “Pas de problème” to indicate that it was no trouble.
  • When someone asks for a favor, you can respond with “Pas de problème, je peux t’aider” which means “No problem, I can help you.”
  • If someone apologizes for a mistake, you can reassure them by saying “Pas de problème, ce n’est rien” which means “No problem, it’s nothing.”

55. J’adore

This phrase is used to express strong affection or love for something or someone. It can be translated to “I love” in English.

  • For example, if you really enjoy a song, you can say “J’adore cette chanson” which means “I love this song.”
  • When talking about a favorite food, you might say “J’adore les pizzas” which means “I love pizzas.”
  • If someone asks about your hobbies, you can say “J’adore faire du sport” which means “I love doing sports.”

56. À bientôt

This is a common phrase used to say goodbye in French. It literally translates to “see you soon” and is often used in casual conversations.

  • For example, you might say, “À bientôt!” when parting ways with a friend.
  • A French teacher might tell their students, “Practice saying ‘À bientôt’ to improve your conversational skills.”
  • When ending a phone call, someone might say, “Talk to you later. À bientôt!”

57. Frog

This slang term is used to refer to the French people. It is considered derogatory and offensive, so it should be used with caution and sensitivity.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t understand those frogs. They speak too fast.”
  • In a discussion about cultural stereotypes, someone might mention, “The term ‘frog’ is often used to mock the French.”
  • It’s important to note that using this term can perpetuate negative stereotypes and should be avoided.
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58. Frenchie

This is a casual nickname used to refer to someone from France. It is often used in a playful or affectionate manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “Hey Frenchie, want to grab a croissant?”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might say, “I met a friendly Frenchie while backpacking in Europe.”
  • It’s important to use this term respectfully and with the person’s consent, as nicknames can be personal.

59. Gaulois

This term refers to the Gauls, an ancient Celtic people who inhabited the region of Gaul (present-day France) before the Roman conquest. It is often used in historical or cultural contexts.

  • For instance, a history professor might say, “The Gaulois were known for their fierce resistance against the Roman Empire.”
  • In a discussion about ancient civilizations, someone might ask, “What were the Gaulois known for besides their resistance?”
  • It’s important to note that this term is not commonly used in everyday conversations about modern France.

60. Cheese-eater

This playful nickname refers to the stereotype that the French love cheese. It is often used in a lighthearted and joking manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “Look at those cheese-eaters enjoying their wine and baguette.”
  • In a conversation about food, someone might mention, “The French are known for being cheese-eaters.”
  • It’s important to use this term with humor and not as a means to mock or stereotype the French people.

61. Voulez-vous coucher avec moi?

This phrase, made popular by the song “Lady Marmalade,” is a flirtatious way to ask someone if they want to have sex. However, it is important to note that this phrase is considered vulgar and inappropriate in most contexts.

  • For example, a character in a movie might use this line to try and seduce someone at a bar.
  • In a joking manner, someone might say, “Voulez-vous coucher avec moi? Just kidding, I’m not that forward!”
  • It is important to understand the cultural context and appropriate use of this phrase before using it.

62. Fromage

This word simply means “cheese” in French. It is commonly used by English speakers to refer to French cheese in a playful or stereotypical way.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I love trying different types of fromage when I visit France.”
  • In a discussion about French cuisine, a person might mention, “Fromage is a staple in many traditional French dishes.”
  • A food enthusiast might post a picture of a cheese platter with the caption, “Can’t resist a good plate of fromage!”

63. Escargot

Escargot refers to the culinary dish of cooked land snails. It is a traditional French delicacy often enjoyed with garlic butter or other flavorful sauces.

  • For example, a person might say, “I tried escargot for the first time and was pleasantly surprised by how delicious it was.”
  • In a restaurant review, someone might mention, “The escargot at this French bistro is a must-try.”
  • A food blogger might share a recipe for homemade escargot with step-by-step instructions.

64. Baguette bag

A baguette bag is a small, elongated bag specifically designed to carry a baguette. It is a practical accessory for those who want to transport a baguette home without it getting squished or damaged.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I always carry a baguette bag with me when I go to the bakery.”
  • In a conversation about French culture, a person might mention, “The baguette bag is a common sight in Parisian streets.”
  • A food lover might post a picture of their baguette bag with the caption, “Never leave home without my trusty baguette bag!”

65. French fry

While not exclusive to French cuisine, French fries are often associated with France. The term “French fry” is used to refer to long, thin strips of deep-fried potatoes that are crispy on the outside and soft on the inside.

  • For example, someone might say, “I ordered a burger and a side of French fries.”
  • In a debate about the origin of French fries, a person might argue, “Contrary to popular belief, French fries are not actually from France.”
  • A food critic might describe a dish as, “The steak was perfectly cooked and served with a side of golden French fries.”