Top 73 Slang For Friend In Spanish – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to speaking Spanish, it’s not just about learning the basics. One of the most important aspects of language is the slang. Slang words add a level of authenticity and connection with native speakers. So, if you’re looking to impress your Spanish-speaking friends or just want to expand your vocabulary, we’ve got you covered. In this article, we’ve compiled a list of the top slang words for “friend” in Spanish that will help you sound like a true local. Get ready to level up your Spanish game!

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1. acere

Acere is a slang term used in some Latin American countries, particularly in the Dominican Republic, to refer to a friend or buddy. It is similar to the English term “buddy” or “pal”.

  • For example, a person might say, “Hey acere, let’s go grab some lunch.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “What’s up, acere?”
  • A group of friends might use the term to greet each other, saying, “Hola, aceres!”

2. alero

Alero is a slang term used in some Latin American countries, particularly in Puerto Rico, to refer to a friend who acts as a wingman. A wingman is someone who supports or assists another person, particularly in social or romantic situations.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need an alero tonight to help me talk to that person.”
  • In a conversation about dating, someone might ask, “Do you have an alero who can introduce me to their friend?”
  • A group of friends might use the term to plan their night out, saying, “Let’s all be each other’s aleros tonight!”

3. bonco

Bonco is a slang term used in some Latin American countries, particularly in Argentina, to refer to a friend or mate. Mate is a traditional South American drink made from steeping dried leaves of the yerba mate plant in hot water. The term “bonco” is used to refer to someone who is a close friend or companion, similar to the English term “mate”.

  • For example, a person might say, “Hey bonco, let’s go watch a movie.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “I’ve known my bonco since we were kids.”
  • A group of friends might use the term to express camaraderie, saying, “Cheers, boncos!”

4. bróder

Bróder is a slang term used in some Latin American countries, particularly in Mexico, to refer to a friend or brother. It is derived from the English term “brother” and is used to express camaraderie and closeness.

  • For instance, a person might say, “What’s up, bróder? Let’s hang out.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Hey bróder, can you lend me some money?”
  • A group of friends might use the term to refer to each other, saying, “We’re all bróders here!”

5. broster

Broster is a slang term used in some Latin American countries, particularly in Colombia, to refer to a friend or buddy. It is a combination of the English terms “brother” and “friend”.

  • For example, a person might say, “Hey broster, let’s go play some soccer.”
  • In a conversation about hanging out, someone might ask, “Do you have any plans, broster?”
  • A group of friends might use the term to greet each other, saying, “What’s up, brosters?”

6. buey

This term is a colloquial way to refer to a friend in Spanish. It can also be used to refer to a person in a general sense, similar to “dude” or “man” in English.

  • For example, “¿Qué pasa, buey?” means “What’s up, dude?”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Vamos, buey, vamos a la fiesta” which means “Let’s go, man, let’s go to the party.”
  • A group of friends might jokingly call each other “buey” to tease or playfully insult each other.

7. cabro

This term is commonly used in some Latin American countries to refer to a friend, similar to “buddy” or “mate” in English. It can also be used to refer to a young person or a child.

  • For instance, “Oye, cabro, ¿vamos al cine?” means “Hey, buddy, let’s go to the movies.”
  • In a conversation about childhood memories, someone might say, “Cuando éramos cabros chicos, solíamos jugar fútbol todos los días” which translates to “When we were little kids, we used to play soccer every day.”
  • Friends might greet each other with “¡Hola,“¡Hola, cabro!” which means “Hello, friend!”

8. cabrón

This term is a colloquial way to refer to a friend in Spanish. It can also be used to refer to a person in a general sense, similar to “dude” or “man” in English. However, it can also have a negative connotation depending on the context.

  • For example, “¿Qué tal, cabrón?” means “What’s up, buddy?”
  • In a conversation about a close friend, someone might say, “Ese cabrón es mi mejor amigo” which translates to “That dude is my best friend.”
  • It’s important to note that the term “cabrón” can also be used as an insult,“cabrón” can also be used as an insult, so it’s essential to consider the context and tone when using it.

9. carnal

This term is commonly used in Mexican Spanish to refer to a friend, similar to “bro” or “brother” in English. It can also be used to refer to a person in a general sense, similar to “dude” or “man” in English.

  • For instance, “¿Qué onda, carnal?” means “What’s up, bro?”
  • In a conversation about a close friend, someone might say, “Ese carnal es mi hermano del alma” which translates to “That brother is my soul brother.”
  • Friends might greet each other with “¡Hola,“¡Hola, carnal!” which means “Hello, brother!”

10. causa

This term is commonly used in Peruvian Spanish to refer to a friend, similar to “mate” or “buddy” in English. It can also be used to refer to a person in a general sense, similar to “dude” or “man” in English.

  • For example, “¿Qué pasa, causa?” means “What’s up, mate?”
  • In a conversation about a close friend, someone might say, “Ese causa es mi pata” which translates to “That mate is my buddy.”
  • Friends might greet each other with “¡Hola,“¡Hola, causa!” which means “Hello, mate!”

11. chamo

A casual term used to refer to a male friend or acquaintance. “Chamo” is commonly used in Venezuela and other Spanish-speaking countries in South America.

  • For instance, a group of friends might greet each other by saying, “¿Qué tal, chamo?” (What’s up, dude?)
  • When talking about a close friend, someone might say, “Mi mejor chamo” (My best dude).
  • In a conversation about hanging out with friends, one might mention, “Vamos a salir con los chamos” (We’re going out with the dudes).

12. chero

A term used to refer to a friend or buddy. “Chero” is commonly used in Guatemala and other Spanish-speaking countries in Central America.

  • For example, someone might say, “Hola, chero” (Hello, buddy) when greeting a friend.
  • When talking about a loyal friend, one might say, “Mi mejor chero” (My best buddy).
  • In a conversation about going out with friends, someone might mention, “Vamos a pasarla bien con los cheros” (We’re going to have a good time with the buddies).

13. choche

A colloquial term used to refer to a friend or pal. “Choche” is commonly used in Spain and other Spanish-speaking countries in Europe.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Hola, choche” (Hello, pal) when greeting a friend.
  • When talking about a close friend, one might say, “Mi mejor choche” (My best pal).
  • In a conversation about hanging out with friends, one might mention, “Vamos a salir con los choches” (We’re going out with the pals).

14. chómpiras

A slang term used to refer to a friend or buddy. “Chómpiras” is commonly used in Mexico and other Spanish-speaking countries in Latin America.

  • For example, someone might say, “Hola, chómpiras” (Hello, buddy) when greeting a friend.
  • When talking about a loyal friend, one might say, “Mi mejor chómpiras” (My best buddy).
  • In a conversation about going out with friends, someone might mention, “Vamos a pasarla bien con los chómpiras” (We’re going to have a good time with the buddies).

15. cobio

A slang term used to refer to a friend or mate. “Cobio” is commonly used in Argentina and other Spanish-speaking countries in South America.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Hola, cobio” (Hello, mate) when greeting a friend.
  • When talking about a close friend, one might say, “Mi mejor cobio” (My best mate).
  • In a conversation about hanging out with friends, one might mention, “Vamos a salir con los cobios” (We’re going out with the mates).

16. collera

Collera is a slang term used in Spanish to refer to a friend or buddy. It is often used in a casual and friendly context.

  • For example, “Voy a salir con mi collera esta noche” (I’m going out with my buddy tonight).
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “Hola, collera, ¿cómo estás?” (Hi, buddy, how are you?).
  • When making plans with a friend, one might ask, “¿Quieres ir al cine, collera?” (Do you want to go to the movies, buddy?).
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17. colega

Colega is a Spanish slang term that is commonly used to refer to a friend or pal. It is often used in a casual and familiar context.

  • For instance, “Voy a quedar con mi colega después del trabajo” (I’m meeting up with my pal after work).
  • In a conversation among friends, one might say, “¡Hola, colega! ¿Qué tal?” (Hi, pal! How are you?).
  • When talking about a close friend, one might mention, “Mi colega siempre está ahí para mí” (My friend is always there for me).

18. socio

Socio is a Spanish slang term that is commonly used to refer to a friend or mate. It is often used in a casual and friendly context.

  • For example, “Voy a salir con mi socio esta noche” (I’m going out with my mate tonight).
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “¡Hola, socio! ¿Qué tal?” (Hi, mate! How are you?).
  • When talking about a trusted friend, one might say, “Mi socio siempre me apoya” (My mate always supports me).

19. compa

Compa is a Spanish slang term used to refer to a friend or buddy. It is often used in a casual and friendly context.

  • For instance, “Voy a salir con mi compa a tomar algo” (I’m going out with my buddy to grab a drink).
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “¡Eh, compa! ¿Qué estás haciendo?” (Hey, buddy! What are you up to?).
  • When talking about a close friend, one might mention, “Mi compa siempre está dispuesto a ayudar” (My buddy is always willing to help).

20. compinche

Compinche is a Spanish slang term used to refer to a friend or pal. It is often used in a casual and familiar context.

  • For example, “Voy a quedar con mi compinche para ir al concierto” (I’m meeting up with my pal to go to the concert).
  • In a conversation among friends, one might say, “¡Hola, compinche! ¿Qué tal?” (Hi, pal! How are you?).
  • When talking about a trusted friend, one might say, “Mi compinche siempre está ahí cuando lo necesito” (My pal is always there when I need him).

21. cuaderno

Although “cuaderno” typically means “notebook” in Spanish, it can also be used as a slang term for “friend” in some Latin American countries.

  • For example, a person might say, “Voy a salir con mis cuadernos” which means “I’m going out with my friends.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “¿Dónde están tus cuadernos?” meaning “Where are your friends?”
  • A group of friends might jokingly refer to themselves as “los cuadernos” or “the notebooks.”

22. cuadro

In some Spanish-speaking communities, “cuadro” can be used as a slang term for “friend” or “crew.” It is commonly used among young people or in urban settings.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Salí con mi cuadro” which means “I went out with my crew.”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might ask, “¿Vas a venir con tu cuadro?” meaning “Are you coming with your friends?”
  • A group of friends might refer to themselves as “el cuadro” or “the crew.”

23. cuate

Derived from the Nahuatl word “cuate” meaning “twin,” this slang term is widely used in Mexico and some other Latin American countries to refer to a close friend or buddy.

  • For example, a person might say, “Voy al cine con mis cuates” which means “I’m going to the movies with my buddies.”
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “¿Dónde están tus cuates?” meaning “Where are your friends?”
  • A group of friends might greet each other by saying, “¡Hola, cuates!” or “Hi, buddies!”

24. cúmbila

This term is commonly used in some Latin American countries, particularly in the Caribbean, to refer to a friend or pal.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Voy a visitar a mis cúmbilas” which means “I’m going to visit my friends.”
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “¿Dónde están tus cúmbilas?” meaning “Where are your pals?”
  • A group of friends might use “cúmbilas” to refer to each other,“cúmbilas” to refer to each other, saying, “Somos los mejores cúmbilas” or “We’re the best pals.”

25. fren

Derived from the English word “friend,” “fren” is a slang term used in some Spanish-speaking communities, particularly in the Caribbean, to refer to a friend or buddy.

  • For example, a person might say, “Vamos a salir con mis frenes” which means “We’re going out with my buddies.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “¿Dónde están tus frenes?” meaning “Where are your friends?”
  • A group of friends might greet each other by saying, “¡Hola, frenes!” or “Hi, buddies!”

26. gomía

This term is used in Argentina and Uruguay to refer to a close friend or buddy. It is similar to the English term “buddy” or “pal”.

  • For example, “Hey gomía, let’s grab a drink after work.”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, someone might say, “I’m going camping with my gomías.”
  • A person introducing their friend might say, “This is my gomía, we’ve known each other since childhood.”

27. güey

This is a Mexican slang term used to refer to a friend or buddy. It can also be used to address someone in a casual or friendly manner.

  • For instance, “Hey güey, what’s up?”
  • In a group of friends, someone might say, “Let’s go, güey!”
  • A person might jokingly say, “You’re my favorite güey.”

28. huevón

This term, commonly used in Chile and Peru, can refer to a friend or buddy. However, it can also carry a connotation of laziness or slowness.

  • For example, “Hola huevón, ¿cómo estás?” (Hello dude, how are you?)
  • In a playful argument, someone might say, “No seas huevón, come help me.”
  • A person might describe their friend as, “Mi huevón favorito” (my favorite dude).

29. íntimo

This term is used in various Spanish-speaking countries to refer to a close friend or intimate friend. It implies a strong bond and trust between individuals.

  • For instance, “Ella es mi íntima, confío en ella completamente” (She is my close friend, I trust her completely).
  • In a conversation about friendships, someone might say, “Tengo pocos íntimos, pero son leales” (I have few close friends, but they are loyal).
  • A person might introduce their friend as, “Este es mi íntimo, hemos compartido muchas experiencias juntos” (This is my close friend, we have shared many experiences together).

30. llave

This term is commonly used in Spain to refer to a friend or buddy. It can also be used to address someone in a friendly or casual manner.

  • For example, “¿Qué pasa, llave?” (What’s up, buddy?)
  • In a group of friends, someone might say, “Vamos, llave, no te quedes atrás” (Let’s go, buddy, don’t stay behind).
  • A person might affectionately say, “Eres mi llave favorita” (You are my favorite buddy).

31. mae

A slang term commonly used in Costa Rica to refer to a friend or buddy. It is similar to the English term “dude” or “mate”.

  • For example, “Hey mae, let’s go grab a beer after work.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I’m meeting up with my maes later.”
  • When introducing a friend, one might say, “This is my mae, Juan.”

32. mano

A slang term used in various Spanish-speaking countries to refer to a friend or brother. It is equivalent to the English term “bro” or “brother”.

  • For instance, “What’s up, mano? Wanna hang out later?”
  • In a friendly conversation, someone might say, “Thanks for having my back, mano.”
  • When addressing a close friend, one might say, “Hey mano, let’s go catch a movie.”

33. ñaño

A colloquial term commonly used in Ecuador to refer to a friend or buddy. It is similar to the English term “buddy” or “pal”.

  • For example, “Hey ñaño, do you want to come over for dinner?”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I’m going out with my ñaños tonight.”
  • When introducing a friend, one might say, “This is my ñaño, Carlos.”

34. pana

A slang term widely used in Venezuela to refer to a friend or pal. It is similar to the English term “pal” or “buddy”.

  • For instance, “Hey pana, let’s go grab some lunch.”
  • In a friendly conversation, someone might say, “I’m going to the beach with my panas.”
  • When addressing a close friend, one might say, “What’s up, pana?”

35. panadería

While not directly related to the slang for friend, “panadería” is a Spanish word that means “bakery”. It does not have a specific slang meaning for friend in Spanish.

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36. parcero

This term is commonly used in Colombia and other Latin American countries to refer to a friend or buddy. It is derived from the word “parce,” which means friend.

  • For example, “Hey parcero, let’s grab a drink tonight.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to the movies with my parcero.”
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “Do you know where my parcero is?”

37. pata

This term is commonly used in Peru and other Spanish-speaking countries to refer to a friend or mate. It is similar to the English term “buddy” or “mate.”

  • For instance, “Hey pata, let’s go play soccer.”
  • A person might say, “I’m meeting my pata for lunch.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Do you have any plans with your pata?”

38. pez

This term is commonly used in Argentina and other Spanish-speaking countries to refer to a friend or dude. It is similar to the English term “dude.”

  • For example, “Hey pez, let’s go surfing.”
  • A person might say, “I’m hanging out with my pez this weekend.”
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “Have you seen my pez?”

39. pibe

This term is commonly used in Argentina and other Spanish-speaking countries to refer to a friend or kid. It is similar to the English term “kid.”

  • For instance, “Hey pibe, let’s go grab some ice cream.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to the park with my pibe.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Do you know where my pibe is?”

40. primo

This term is commonly used in Spain and other Spanish-speaking countries to refer to a friend or cousin. It is similar to the English term “cousin.”

  • For example, “Hey primo, let’s go watch a movie.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to the party with my primo.”
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “Have you seen my primo?”

41. tío

This term is commonly used to refer to a friend or acquaintance in a casual and friendly way. It is similar to calling someone “dude” or “buddy” in English.

  • For example, “¡Hola, tío! ¿Cómo estás?” (Hello, dude! How are you?)
  • In a conversation between friends, one might say, “Oye, tío, ¿vamos al cine mañana?” (Hey, buddy, let’s go to the movies tomorrow!)
  • When talking about a close friend, someone might say, “Mi mejor amigo es como un hermano, es mi tío” (My best friend is like a brother, he’s my buddy).

42. tronco

This term is used to refer to a friend or buddy, similar to “dude” or “pal” in English. It conveys a sense of camaraderie and closeness.

  • For instance, “Oye, tronco, ¿quieres salir esta noche?” (Hey, bud, do you want to go out tonight?)
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “¡Hola, troncos! ¿Cómo les va?” (Hello, buds! How are you all doing?)
  • When talking about a loyal friend, someone might say, “Mi tronco siempre está ahí para apoyarme” (My bud is always there to support me).

43. valedor

This term is commonly used to refer to a friend or buddy. It is similar to “mate” or “buddy” in English and conveys a sense of trust and camaraderie.

  • For example, “Hola, valedor, ¿cómo estás?” (Hello, buddy, how are you?)
  • In a conversation between friends, one might say, “Vamos, valedor, no te preocupes, todo saldrá bien” (Come on, buddy, don’t worry, everything will be fine)
  • When talking about a close friend, someone might say, “Mi valedor siempre está dispuesto a ayudarme” (My buddy is always willing to help me).

44. viejo

This term is often used to refer to a friend or buddy in a friendly and informal way. It is similar to calling someone “old man” or “dude” in English.

  • For instance, “¿Qué pasa, viejo? ¿Vamos a jugar al fútbol?” (What’s up, old man? Shall we play soccer?)
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “¡Hola, viejos! ¿Listos para pasar un buen rato?” (Hello, dudes! Ready to have a good time?)
  • When talking about a long-time friend, someone might say, “Mi viejo y yo hemos sido amigos desde la infancia” (My old man and I have been friends since childhood).

45. yunta

This term is often used to refer to a friend or partner in a friendly and informal way. It conveys a sense of companionship and camaraderie.

  • For example, “Hola, yunta, ¿quieres ir al concierto conmigo?” (Hello, partner, do you want to go to the concert with me?)
  • In a conversation between friends, one might say, “Vamos, yunta, juntos podemos lograrlo” (Come on, partner, together we can achieve it)
  • When talking about a trusted friend, someone might say, “Mi yunta siempre está ahí para apoyarme en todo” (My partner is always there to support me in everything).

46. Amigo

This is the most common and widely used term for “friend” in Spanish. It can refer to both male and female friends.

  • For example, “Hola amigo, ¿cómo estás?” (Hello friend, how are you?)
  • A person might say, “Mis amigos son muy importantes para mí” (My friends are very important to me)
  • When introducing someone, you might say, “Este es mi amigo Juan” (This is my friend Juan)

47. Compañero

This term can be used to refer to a friend, partner, or colleague. It implies a closer relationship and is often used in a more formal or professional setting.

  • For instance, “Trabajo con mi compañero de equipo” (I work with my teammate)
  • In a school setting, you might say, “Mis compañeros de clase son muy amables” (My classmates are very friendly)
  • When talking about a travel buddy, you could say, “Mi compañero de viaje y yo exploramos la ciudad juntos” (My travel companion and I explored the city together)

48. Bro

This term is borrowed from English and is commonly used among younger generations. It is often used to refer to a close male friend, similar to “brother” in English.

  • For example, “¿Qué pasa, bro?” (What’s up, bro?)
  • Two friends might greet each other by saying, “¡Hola, bro!” (Hello, bro!)
  • When someone helps you out, you might say, “¡Gracias, bro! Eres el mejor” (Thanks, bro! You’re the best)

49. Camarada

This term has a more formal and political connotation, often associated with comradeship or solidarity. It is commonly used in military or political contexts.

  • For instance, “Luchamos juntos, camaradas” (We fight together, comrades)
  • In a political discussion, someone might say, “Nuestros camaradas están luchando por la justicia” (Our comrades are fighting for justice)
  • When talking about a close friend who shares the same beliefs, you could say, “Mi camarada siempre está a mi lado” (My comrade is always by my side)

50. Panita

This term is commonly used in Latin America, particularly in the Caribbean, to refer to a close friend or buddy. It has a warm and friendly connotation.

  • For example, “Vamos a salir juntos, panita” (Let’s go out together, pal)
  • Two friends might greet each other by saying, “¡Hola, panita!” (Hello, pal!)
  • When someone asks for a favor, you might say, “Claro, panita, cuenta conmigo” (Of course, pal, you can count on me)

51. Compadre

Compadre is a Spanish term used to refer to a close friend or buddy. It is often used to address someone with whom one shares a strong bond or camaraderie.

  • For example, “Hey compadre, let’s grab a drink tonight.”
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “This is my compadre, we’ve known each other since childhood.”
  • When asking a friend for a favor, one might say, “Hey compadre, can you lend me some money?”

52. Chavo

Chavo is a Mexican slang term used to refer to a friend or buddy, especially someone who is younger or less experienced. It is similar to the English term “kid” or “youngster.”

  • For instance, “Hey chavo, want to play soccer with us?”
  • When talking to a group of friends, one might say, “What’s up, chavos?”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my chavo, we’ve been friends since high school.”

53. Maje

Maje is a slang term used in Central American countries, particularly El Salvador, to refer to a friend or dude. It is a casual term used among peers to address someone in a friendly manner.

  • For example, “Hey maje, let’s go grab some food.”
  • When talking to a group of friends, one might say, “What’s up, majes?”
  • A person might greet their friend by saying, “Hola, maje, ¿cómo estás?”

54. Parce

Parce is a Colombian slang term used to refer to a friend or mate. It is a word commonly used among young people and is similar to the English term “mate” or “buddy.”

  • For instance, “Hey parce, let’s go watch a movie.”
  • When introducing a friend, one might say, “This is my parce, we’ve known each other for years.”
  • A person might ask their friend for a favor by saying, “Parce, can you help me with this?”

55. Churri

Churri is a Spanish slang term used to refer to a friend or honey. It is a term of endearment often used between romantic partners or close friends.

  • For example, “Hey churri, want to go out for dinner tonight?”
  • When talking to a group of friends, one might say, “What’s up, churris?”
  • A person might express their affection for their friend by saying, “Te quiero mucho, churri.”

56. Majo

This word is used in Spain to refer to a friend or a guy. It is a casual and friendly way to address someone.

  • For example, “Hey majo, let’s grab a beer later.”
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “What’s up, majos?”
  • If someone helps you out, you can say, “Thanks, majo!”

57. Quillo

This term is commonly used in Andalusia, Spain to refer to a friend or a guy. It is a friendly and familiar way to address someone.

  • For instance, “Hey quillo, let’s go watch the game together.”
  • In a conversation among friends, one might say, “Quillo, have you heard the latest news?”
  • If a friend does something funny, you can say, “You’re such a quillo!”

58. Broder

This word is used in Latin America, particularly in Argentina, to refer to a friend or a guy. It is similar to calling someone “brother” in English and signifies a close bond.

  • For example, “Hey broder, let’s go grab some food.”
  • Among a group of friends, one might say, “What’s up, broders?”
  • If a friend helps you out, you can say, “Thanks, broder!”

59. Chabón

This term is commonly used in Argentina to refer to a friend or a guy. It is a casual and friendly way to address someone.

  • For instance, “Hey chabón, wanna hang out later?”
  • In a conversation among friends, one might say, “Chabón, check out this new song.”
  • If someone tells a funny joke, you can say, “Haha, you’re such a chabón!”

60. Ñeri

This word is used in Puerto Rico to refer to a friend or a guy. It is a colloquial and friendly way to address someone.

  • For example, “Hey ñeri, let’s go to the beach.”
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “What’s up, ñeris?”
  • If a friend does something cool, you can say, “You’re the best, ñeri!”

61. Patacón

Patacón is a slang term used in some Latin American countries to refer to a friend or buddy. It is a casual and friendly way to address someone you have a close relationship with.

  • For example, “Hey patacón, let’s grab a drink tonight.”
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “Patacón, can you pass me the remote?”
  • When introducing a friend to someone else, you could say, “This is my patacón, we’ve known each other for years.”

62. Ñero

Ñero is a colloquial term used mainly in Mexico to refer to a friend or pal. It is a casual and familiar way to address someone you have a close bond with.

  • For instance, “What’s up, ñero? Let’s go grab some tacos.”
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “Hey ñero, did you watch the game last night?”
  • When talking about a friend, you could say, “He’s my ñero, we’ve been friends since childhood.”

63. Amigou

Amigou is a playful variation of the word “amigo” used in some Spanish-speaking countries, particularly in the Caribbean. It is a term of endearment used to refer to a close friend or buddy.

  • For example, “Hey amigou, let’s go to the beach this weekend.”
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “Amigou, can you pass me the chips?”
  • When talking about a friend, you could say, “He’s my amigou, we’ve been through thick and thin together.”

64. Parça

Parça is a slang term used in Turkey to refer to a friend or mate. It is an affectionate way to address someone you have a close bond with.

  • For instance, “What’s up, parça? Let’s go grab some tea.”
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “Hey parça, did you hear the latest gossip?”
  • When introducing a friend to someone else, you could say, “This is my parça, we’ve been friends since college.”

65. Paisano

Paisano is a slang term used in some Spanish-speaking countries, particularly in Latin America, to refer to a friend or buddy. It is a casual and friendly way to address someone you have a close relationship with.

  • For example, “Hey paisano, let’s go watch a soccer game.”
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “Paisano, can you lend me some money?”
  • When talking about a friend, you could say, “He’s my paisano, we grew up in the same neighborhood.”

66. Cuñado

In Spanish slang, “cuñado” is commonly used to refer to a friend or acquaintance, similar to how “brother-in-law” can be used in English. It is often used in a casual and friendly manner.

  • For example, a person might say, “¿Qué pasa, cuñado?” (What’s up, bro?)
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “Vamos a salir, cuñados” (Let’s go out, guys).
  • When joking around with a friend, someone might say, “Eres mi cuñado favorito” (You’re my favorite brother-in-law).
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67. Hermano

In Spanish, “hermano” means brother. However, it is also commonly used as slang to refer to a friend or buddy. It conveys a sense of camaraderie and closeness.

  • For instance, someone might say, “¿Cómo estás, hermano?” (How are you, brother?)
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “Vamos, hermanos” (Let’s go, brothers).
  • When expressing gratitude or support to a friend, someone might say, “Gracias, hermano” (Thanks, brother).

68. Chato

In Spanish slang, “chato” is used to refer to a friend or pal. It is a casual and affectionate term that conveys familiarity and closeness.

  • For example, someone might say, “Hola, chato” (Hi, pal).
  • In a friendly conversation, one might say, “¿Qué tal, chato?” (What’s up, buddy?)
  • When teasing a friend, someone might say, “Eres un chato divertido” (You’re a funny pal).

69. Guey

In Mexican Spanish slang, “guey” (pronounced like “way”) is a common term used to refer to a friend or buddy. It is similar to how “dude” is used in English.

  • For instance, someone might say, “¿Qué onda, guey?” (What’s up, dude?)
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “Vamos, gueyes” (Let’s go, dudes).
  • When expressing surprise or disbelief, someone might say, “¡No mames, guey!” (No way, dude!)

70. Vato

In Mexican and Chicano slang, “vato” is a term used to refer to a friend or dude. It is a casual and familiar term commonly used among young people.

  • For example, someone might say, “¿Qué pedo, vato?” (What’s up, dude?)
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “Vamos, vatos” (Let’s go, dudes).
  • When joking around with a friend, someone might say, “Eres un buen vato” (You’re a good dude).

71. Churro

This term is commonly used in Mexico and some other Spanish-speaking countries to refer to a friend or buddy. It is a casual and friendly way to address someone, similar to “dude” or “buddy” in English.

  • For example, “Hey Churro, let’s go grab some tacos.”
  • When greeting a friend, one might say, “¿Qué onda, Churro?” which translates to “What’s up, dude?”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Churro, you won’t believe what happened yesterday.”

72. Jato

This term is commonly used in Spain and some Latin American countries to refer to a friend or buddy. It is a slang term derived from the word “hogar,” which means home or dwelling. “Jato” is similar to calling someone “bro” or “homie” in English.

  • For instance, “What’s up, Jato? Let’s go out tonight.”
  • When inviting a friend over, one might say, “Come to my jato, we can watch a movie.”
  • In a group of friends, someone might say, “Jato, you always make me laugh.”

73. Chamba

In some Spanish-speaking countries, “chamba” is a slang term used to refer to a friend or buddy. It is derived from the English word “job” and is used in a similar way to “mate” or “buddy” in English.

  • For example, “Hey Chamba, let’s go play soccer.”
  • When talking about a friend, one might say, “My Chamba is always there for me.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Chamba, you’re the best friend anyone could ask for.”