Top 61 Slang For Frustrated – Meaning & Usage

Feeling frustrated and in need of the perfect words to express your exasperation? Look no further! We’ve got your back with a curated list of the most relatable and trendy slang for frustrated moments. Let’s dive in and discover the language of irritation that will have you nodding in agreement and maybe even cracking a smile at the accuracy.

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1. Fed up

When someone is “fed up,” they have reached the point of extreme frustration or annoyance. It implies that they have had enough and cannot tolerate the situation any longer.

  • For example, “I am fed up with my noisy neighbors. They never turn down their music.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m fed up with this job. I deserve better treatment.”
  • Another person might express their frustration by saying, “I’m fed up with the constant traffic in this city.”

2. Pissed off

To be “pissed off” means to be extremely angry or irritated. It is a stronger form of frustration, often accompanied by a sense of indignation or offense.

  • For instance, “I am so pissed off at my friend for betraying my trust.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m pissed off that my flight got canceled at the last minute.”
  • Another person might express their anger by saying, “I’m pissed off at my boss for giving me extra work without any recognition.”

3. Ticked off

To be “ticked off” means to be annoyed or irritated by something. It implies a sense of frustration and dissatisfaction, but not necessarily to the same degree as being “fed up” or “pissed off.”

  • For example, “I’m really ticked off that my favorite restaurant is closed for renovations.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m ticked off that my package hasn’t arrived yet.”
  • Another person might express their annoyance by saying, “I’m ticked off that my computer keeps crashing.”

4. Aggravated

To be “aggravated” means to be annoyed or exasperated by something. It implies a feeling of frustration and irritation, often caused by repeated or persistent annoyances.

  • For instance, “I’m so aggravated by the constant noise from construction work outside my apartment.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m aggravated that my phone keeps freezing and crashing.”
  • Another person might express their frustration by saying, “I’m aggravated by the slow internet speed in my area.”

5. Irritated

To be “irritated” means to be annoyed or bothered by something. It implies a mild form of frustration or discomfort, often caused by minor annoyances or inconveniences.

  • For example, “I’m irritated by the loud chewing noises my coworker makes.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m irritated that my favorite TV show got canceled.”
  • Another person might express their annoyance by saying, “I’m irritated by people who talk loudly on their phones in public places.”

6. Annoyed

This word is used to describe a feeling of slight irritation or displeasure. It is often used in situations where something is bothersome or frustrating, but not necessarily anger-inducing.

  • For example, “I’m really annoyed that my favorite TV show got canceled.”
  • Someone might say, “I get annoyed when people talk loudly on their phones in public.”
  • A person might express their annoyance by saying, “Stop tapping your pen, it’s really annoying.”

7. Bothered

This word is used to describe a feeling of being troubled or disturbed by something. It implies a sense of discomfort or unease, often caused by an annoyance or inconvenience.

  • For instance, “I’m bothered by the constant noise from construction outside my window.”
  • A person might say, “I’m bothered that my coworker never cleans up after themselves in the breakroom.”
  • Someone might express their frustration by saying, “It really bothers me when people chew with their mouths open.”

8. Disgruntled

This word is used to describe a feeling of dissatisfaction or discontent. It implies a sense of resentment or frustration, often caused by a perceived injustice or unmet expectations.

  • For example, “The disgruntled customer complained about the poor service at the restaurant.”
  • A person might say, “I’m disgruntled that my boss didn’t give me the promotion I deserved.”
  • Someone might express their frustration by saying, “I’m feeling disgruntled with the slow progress on this project.”

9. Upset

This word is used to describe a feeling of emotional distress or agitation. It implies a sense of being deeply affected or troubled by something, often causing sadness, anger, or frustration.

  • For instance, “I’m upset that I didn’t get invited to the party.”
  • A person might say, “I’m upset that my favorite team lost the championship game.”
  • Someone might express their frustration by saying, “I’m really upset with myself for making such a silly mistake.”

10. Displeased

This word is used to describe a feeling of dissatisfaction or disappointment. It implies a sense of being unhappy or unfulfilled with a particular situation or outcome.

  • For example, “The customer was displeased with the quality of the product.”
  • A person might say, “I’m displeased with the way my friend treated me.”
  • Someone might express their frustration by saying, “I’m really displeased that the event was canceled at the last minute.”

11. Agitated

When someone is agitated, they are feeling irritated or annoyed. It often involves a sense of restlessness or unease.

  • For example, “She was agitated by the constant noise outside her window.”
  • A person might say, “I get agitated when people don’t listen to me.”
  • In a stressful situation, someone might feel agitated and say, “I can’t handle this, I’m getting agitated.”

12. Vexed

To be vexed means to be bothered or frustrated by something. It implies a sense of annoyance or irritation.

  • For instance, “He was vexed by the slow internet connection.”
  • A person might say, “I’m really vexed that my favorite show got canceled.”
  • When facing a difficult problem, someone might express their frustration by saying, “I’m completely vexed, I don’t know what to do.”

13. Riled up

To be riled up means to be angry or agitated. It suggests a heightened emotional state, often due to being provoked or irritated.

  • For example, “The controversial statement riled up the crowd.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t get riled up over small things.”
  • When discussing a heated argument, someone might say, “The disagreement really got me riled up.”

14. Miffed

When someone is miffed, they are feeling annoyed or displeased. It is a mild form of frustration that often involves a sense of being slighted or offended.

  • For instance, “She was miffed when her friend canceled their plans last minute.”
  • A person might say, “I’m a bit miffed that I didn’t get invited to the party.”
  • When receiving a subpar service, someone might express their dissatisfaction by saying, “I’m feeling miffed about the poor customer service.”

15. Perturbed

To be perturbed means to be disturbed or unsettled by something. It implies a sense of unease or disquietude.

  • For example, “The strange noise in the middle of the night perturbed her.”
  • A person might say, “I’m perturbed by the lack of progress in this project.”
  • When facing an unexpected turn of events, someone might express their unease by saying, “I’m feeling perturbed about the sudden change in plans.”

16. Peeved

This word is used to describe a mild level of frustration or irritation.

  • For example, “I’m peeved that my favorite coffee shop is closed today.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling peeved because my computer keeps freezing.”
  • Another might express, “I’m peeved that I have to wait in line for so long.”

17. Chafed

This word is used to describe a feeling of irritation or annoyance, often due to a disagreement or conflict.

  • For instance, “I’m chafed that my coworker took credit for my idea.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling chafed because my friend canceled our plans last minute.”
  • Another might express, “I’m chafed that my boss didn’t give me the promotion I deserved.”

18. Irked

This word is used to describe a slight level of frustration or annoyance.

  • For example, “I’m irked that my phone battery died right before an important call.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling irked because my neighbor keeps playing loud music.”
  • Another might express, “I’m irked that the restaurant messed up my order.”

19. Harassed

This word is used to describe a feeling of being constantly bothered or annoyed by someone or something.

  • For instance, “I’m harassed by telemarketers calling me every day.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling harassed because my boss keeps piling on more work.”
  • Another might express, “I’m harassed by my neighbor’s dog barking all night.”

20. Ruffled

This word is used to describe a feeling of being disturbed or upset, often due to a disruption or conflict.

  • For example, “I’m ruffled that my flight got delayed and I’ll miss my connection.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling ruffled because my coworker made a rude comment.”
  • Another might express, “I’m ruffled that my favorite team lost the game.”

21. Discontented

This term refers to a feeling of dissatisfaction or unhappiness. It is often used to describe a state of being frustrated or displeased with a situation.

  • For example, “She was discontented with her job and decided to look for a new one.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling discontented with the lack of progress in this project.”
  • Another might express, “I’ve been feeling discontented with my current relationship lately.”

22. Incensed

This word describes a strong feeling of anger or outrage. It is often used to convey a sense of frustration or irritation.

  • For instance, “She was incensed by the unfair treatment she received.”
  • A person might say, “I am absolutely incensed by the way they handled this situation.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I can’t believe he said that! I’m so incensed right now!”

23. Frustrated

This term refers to a feeling of being irritated or annoyed, often as a result of being unable to achieve a desired outcome or goal.

  • For example, “I’m feeling frustrated because I can’t seem to solve this problem.”
  • A person might say, “I’m so frustrated with the slow progress of this project.”
  • Another might express, “I’m getting really frustrated with her constant interruptions.”

24. Flustered

This word describes a state of being agitated or confused, often as a result of feeling overwhelmed or frustrated.

  • For instance, “She was flustered by the unexpected turn of events.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling flustered because I can’t find my keys.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I’m so flustered right now, I can’t think straight!”

25. Enraged

This term describes an intense feeling of anger or rage. It is often used to convey a sense of extreme frustration or fury.

  • For example, “He was enraged by the injustice of the situation.”
  • A person might say, “I am absolutely enraged by their lack of accountability.”
  • Another might express, “I’m so enraged right now, I can’t even speak!”

26. Disappointed

Feeling unhappy or dissatisfied because something did not meet your expectations or hopes.

  • For example, “I’m disappointed that my favorite team lost the game.”
  • A student might say, “I studied so hard for the test and got a low grade. I’m really disappointed.”
  • Someone might express, “I had high hopes for the movie, but it was a disappointment.”

27. Discombobulated

Feeling confused, disoriented, or thrown off balance, often due to a chaotic or overwhelming situation.

  • For instance, “After the long flight and time zone changes, I felt completely discombobulated.”
  • Someone might say, “I was so discombobulated by the unexpected news that I couldn’t think straight.”
  • A person might describe, “When I entered the crowded room, the noise and activity made me feel discombobulated.”

28. Chagrined

Feeling embarrassed, humiliated, or irritated due to a perceived failure, mistake, or disappointment.

  • For example, “I was chagrined when I realized I had forgotten my speech notes.”
  • A person might say, “I felt chagrined after making a clumsy mistake in front of everyone.”
  • Someone might express, “I was chagrined by the negative feedback on my work.”

29. Disheartened

Feeling demoralized, discouraged, or dispirited due to a setback or disappointment.

  • For instance, “The constant rejections have left me feeling disheartened.”
  • A student might say, “I studied so hard for the exam, but when I saw the grade, I felt disheartened.”
  • A person might express, “I was disheartened by the lack of progress despite my efforts.”

30. Aggrieved

Feeling resentful, indignant, or distressed due to a perceived injustice or mistreatment.

  • For example, “The aggrieved employee filed a complaint against their unfair treatment.”
  • A person might say, “I feel aggrieved by the way I was treated in that situation.”
  • Someone might express, “The aggrieved party demanded compensation for the damages caused.”

31. Rattled

To feel disturbed or unsettled, often due to a stressful or frustrating situation.

  • For example, “I was rattled by the sudden loud noise.”
  • A person might say, “The constant interruptions at work have me feeling rattled.”
  • Another might express, “I can’t concentrate when I’m feeling rattled.”

32. Testy

To be in a state of irritability or impatience, often due to frustration.

  • For instance, “He’s been testy all day, snapping at everyone.”
  • Someone might comment, “The heat is making me feel testy.”
  • Another might say, “Don’t ask him any questions right now, he’s feeling testy.”

33. Peevish

To be in a state of annoyance or irritability, often due to frustration.

  • For example, “She’s been in a peevish mood ever since she lost her keys.”
  • A person might say, “I get peevish when things don’t go according to plan.”
  • Another might comment, “Don’t bother her right now, she’s feeling peevish.”

34. Frazzled

To feel mentally or physically drained, often due to stress or frustration.

  • For instance, “After a long day at work, I feel completely frazzled.”
  • Someone might say, “The constant noise and activity in the city leave me feeling frazzled.”
  • Another might comment, “I can’t think straight when I’m feeling frazzled.”

35. Rankled

To feel persistent irritation or annoyance, often due to a frustrating or upsetting situation.

  • For example, “His comment about my work really rankled me.”
  • A person might say, “The unfair treatment rankled her for days.”
  • Another might express, “It still rankles me when I think about that argument.”

36. Disconcerted

Feeling disconcerted means being thrown off balance or feeling uncertain and unsettled. It is often used to describe a state of frustration or annoyance.

  • For example, “I was disconcerted by the sudden change in plans.”
  • In a discussion about a confusing situation, someone might say, “I’m feeling disconcerted about what’s going on.”
  • A person might express their frustration by saying, “I’m so disconcerted with this whole situation!”

37. Discontent

Being discontent means feeling unsatisfied or unhappy with a situation. It is often used to describe a state of frustration or dissatisfaction.

  • For instance, “She was discontent with her current job.”
  • In a conversation about personal goals, someone might say, “I’m feeling discontent with where I am in life.”
  • A person might express their frustration by saying, “I’m so discontent with how things are going!”

38. Fretful

Feeling fretful means being anxious or agitated, often due to frustration or worry. It is often used to describe a state of restlessness or irritation.

  • For example, “The constant delays made him feel fretful.”
  • In a discussion about a stressful situation, someone might say, “I’m feeling so fretful right now.”
  • A person might express their frustration by saying, “I’m so fretful about this whole situation!”

39. Displeasured

Being displeasured means feeling unhappy or dissatisfied with a situation. It is often used to describe a state of frustration or disappointment.

  • For instance, “He was displeasured with the poor customer service.”
  • In a conversation about a negative experience, someone might say, “I’m feeling displeasured with how things turned out.”
  • A person might express their frustration by saying, “I’m so displeasured with the lack of progress!”

40. Huffy

Feeling huffy means being easily irritated or annoyed, often due to frustration. It is often used to describe a state of indignation or petulance.

  • For example, “She stormed off in a huffy manner.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s reaction, someone might say, “He got all huffy and defensive.”
  • A person might express their frustration by saying, “Don’t get all huffy with me!”

41. Grouchy

When someone is grouchy, they are easily annoyed or irritated. It is a colloquial term used to describe a state of being in a bad mood.

  • For example, “Don’t talk to him right now, he’s feeling grouchy.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling so grouchy today, everything is annoying me.”
  • Another might complain, “I can’t stand being around grouchy people, they bring everyone down.”

42. Disillusioned

When someone is disillusioned, they feel disappointed or let down, often because their expectations were not met. It is a term used to describe a state of feeling disenchanted or disheartened.

  • For instance, “She became disillusioned with politics after her favorite candidate lost the election.”
  • A person might say, “I used to believe in love, but now I’m just disillusioned.”
  • Another might express, “I feel so disillusioned with my job, it’s not what I thought it would be.”

43. Fuming

When someone is fuming, they are extremely angry or enraged. It is a term used to describe a state of being furious or boiling with anger.

  • For example, “He was fuming when he found out his car had been towed.”
  • A person might say, “I’m still fuming about what she said to me.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I could see the steam coming out of his ears, he was fuming mad!”

44. Bummed out

When someone is bummed out, they feel disappointed or downcast. It is a colloquial term used to describe a state of feeling unhappy or let down.

  • For instance, “I’m really bummed out that I didn’t get the job.”
  • A person might say, “She’s been bummed out ever since her favorite band broke up.”
  • Another might express, “I’m so bummed out that I couldn’t go on the trip.”

45. Bugged

When someone is bugged, they are annoyed or bothered. It is a slang term used to describe a state of being irritated or agitated.

  • For example, “Stop bugging me, I’m trying to concentrate.”
  • A person might say, “I’m really bugged by the constant noise outside my apartment.”
  • Another might complain, “It really bugs me when people don’t clean up after themselves.”

46. Dismayed

Feeling discouraged, disappointed, or upset about a situation or outcome. “Dismayed” is often used to express a sense of frustration or distress.

  • For example, “I was dismayed to find out that my flight had been cancelled.”
  • A person discussing a disappointing event might say, “I was completely dismayed by the outcome.”
  • Someone might express their frustration by saying, “I’m feeling really dismayed about the lack of progress on this project.”

47. Distressed

Feeling upset, troubled, or distressed about something. “Distressed” is a term often used to describe a state of frustration or emotional discomfort.

  • For instance, “I was so distressed when I realized I had lost my wallet.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling really distressed about the current state of affairs.”
  • Another might express their frustration by saying, “I’m getting more and more distressed by the lack of communication.”

48. Wound up

Feeling tense, agitated, or frustrated. “Wound up” is a colloquial term often used to describe a state of heightened frustration or anxiety.

  • For example, “I was really wound up before my job interview.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling really wound up about this upcoming deadline.”
  • Another might express their frustration by saying, “I’m so wound up about this traffic jam.”

49. Out of sorts

Feeling unsettled, uncomfortable, or not quite oneself. “Out of sorts” is a phrase often used to describe a state of frustration or unease.

  • For instance, “I’ve been feeling really out of sorts since I got bad news.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling completely out of sorts today.”
  • Another might express their frustration by saying, “I feel so out of sorts with all the changes happening.”

50. Tetchy

Feeling easily annoyed, impatient, or frustrated. “Tetchy” is a term often used to describe a state of irritability or short-temperedness.

  • For example, “I’m feeling so tetchy today, everything is getting on my nerves.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been really tetchy lately, I need a break.”
  • Another might express their frustration by saying, “Don’t mind me, I’m just feeling a bit tetchy right now.”

51. Raging

This term describes a state of intense anger or frustration. It implies a loss of control and often includes a strong desire to express or release that anger.

  • For example, “I was raging when I found out my car had been towed.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m absolutely raging about this unfair decision.”
  • A person experiencing road rage might yell, “Get out of my way, you idiot!”

52. Harried

To be harried means to feel constantly rushed, overwhelmed, or stressed. It conveys a sense of being under pressure and having too much to do.

  • For instance, “I’ve been so harried lately with work deadlines and family obligations.”
  • Someone might say, “I feel harried trying to juggle multiple responsibilities.”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t catch a break. I’m always harried.”

53. Exasperated

Exasperated describes a state of extreme frustration or annoyance. It suggests that one has reached the limits of their patience or tolerance.

  • For example, “I’m exasperated with my computer constantly crashing.”
  • A person might say, “I’m exasperated by the lack of communication from my boss.”
  • Someone might express their exasperation by saying, “I can’t believe you forgot our anniversary again!”

54. Livid

Livid describes a state of intense anger or fury. It implies a deep emotional reaction and often includes a physical response such as shaking or trembling.

  • For instance, “I was absolutely livid when I found out I had been lied to.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m livid about the way I’ve been treated.”
  • A person might express their livid state by saying, “I can’t believe you betrayed my trust like that!”

55. Flummoxed

To be flummoxed means to be completely puzzled, confused, or bewildered. It suggests a state of not knowing what to do or how to proceed.

  • For example, “I was flummoxed by the complex instructions.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m completely flummoxed by this math problem.”
  • A person might express their flummoxed state by saying, “I have no idea how to fix this broken computer!”

56. Riled

When someone is “riled,” they are feeling angry or irritated. It can be used to describe a person’s emotional state or reaction to a situation.

  • For example, “He was really riled up after the argument.”
  • A person might say, “I’m getting riled just thinking about it.”
  • In a heated discussion, someone might comment, “Don’t get riled, let’s try to find a solution.”

57. Galled

To be “galled” means to feel annoyed or offended by something. It often implies a sense of injustice or unfairness.

  • For instance, “I was really galled by his rude comment.”
  • Someone might say, “It galls me to see how they treat their employees.”
  • In a discussion about unfair policies, a person might comment, “It’s galling to see how they get away with it.”

58. Steamed

When someone is “steamed,” they are extremely angry. It suggests a high level of frustration and can be used to describe a person’s emotional state.

  • For example, “He was steamed after finding out he had been lied to.”
  • A person might say, “I’m steamed about the way they handled the situation.”
  • In a story about a frustrating experience, someone might say, “I was so steamed, I couldn’t even speak.”

59. Hot and bothered

To feel “hot and bothered” is to be agitated or irritated. It can describe a person’s emotional state or reaction to a situation.

  • For instance, “She was hot and bothered by his constant interruptions.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m feeling hot and bothered by all the noise.”
  • In a discussion about a stressful situation, a person might comment, “I was really hot and bothered, trying to meet the deadline.”

60. Teed off

When someone is “teed off,” they are extremely angry or annoyed. It can be used to describe a person’s emotional state or reaction to a situation.

  • For example, “He was teed off when he found out they had canceled his reservation.”
  • A person might say, “I’m teed off about the way they treated me.”
  • In a story about a frustrating encounter, someone might comment, “I was so teed off, I had to walk away.”

61. Cranky

When someone is cranky, they are easily annoyed or irritated. It is often used to describe someone who is in a bad mood or feeling frustrated.

  • For example, “I didn’t get enough sleep last night, so I’m feeling really cranky today.”
  • If someone is being grumpy and easily upset, you might say, “Why are you so cranky all the time?”
  • When a person is feeling frustrated and short-tempered, they might snap at others and say, “I’m sorry, I’m just feeling really cranky right now.”
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