Top 67 Slang For Furthermore – Meaning & Usage

Sometimes, “furthermore” just doesn’t cut it when it comes to expressing yourself. That’s why we’ve put together a list of the top slang phrases for “furthermore” that will add some spice to your conversations. Whether you’re looking to impress your friends or simply want to stay in the loop with the latest language trends, this listicle has got you covered. Get ready to take your vocabulary to the next level and discover new ways to say “furthermore” like a pro!

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1. Moreover

Moreover is used to introduce additional information or support for a previous statement. It is often used to emphasize a point or provide further evidence.

  • For example, “The study found that exercise can improve mental health. Moreover, it can also reduce the risk of chronic diseases.”
  • A writer might use moreover to strengthen their argument, saying, “The new law will not only protect the environment but moreover, it will create jobs.”
  • In a discussion about travel, someone might say, “The city has beautiful architecture. Moreover, it offers a vibrant nightlife scene.”

2. Additionally

Additionally is a word used to add more information or examples to a previous statement. It is often used to indicate that there is more to consider or that there are other relevant points.

  • For instance, “The restaurant serves delicious food. Additionally, it offers a wide selection of wines.”
  • In a conversation about hobbies, someone might say, “I enjoy playing the piano. Additionally, I like to paint in my free time.”
  • A student might mention, “I have completed all my assignments. Additionally, I have started studying for the upcoming exams.”

3. Furthermore

Furthermore is a word used to introduce additional information or arguments that support or strengthen a previous statement. It is often used to indicate a logical progression or to emphasize a point.

  • For example, “The company has experienced significant growth. Furthermore, it has expanded into new markets.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “The proposed policy will benefit the economy. Furthermore, it will create more job opportunities.”
  • A journalist might use furthermore to provide additional evidence, stating, “The study found that exercise improves cardiovascular health. Furthermore, it can help reduce stress levels.”

4. Plus

Plus is a word used to introduce an additional positive aspect or advantage of a situation or argument. It is often used to highlight something positive or to emphasize the benefits.

  • For instance, “The hotel has a swimming pool. Plus, it offers complimentary breakfast.”
  • In a discussion about a job offer, someone might say, “The salary is competitive. Plus, the company offers great benefits.”
  • A food critic might mention, “The restaurant has delicious food. Plus, the service is excellent.”

5. On top of that

On top of that is a phrase used to introduce an additional point or factor that adds to the previous statement. It is often used to emphasize the significance or impact of the additional information.

  • For example, “The car has advanced safety features. On top of that, it has excellent fuel efficiency.”
  • In a conversation about a promotion, someone might say, “The new position comes with a higher salary. On top of that, it offers more responsibilities and opportunities.”
  • A traveler might mention, “The hotel has a beautiful beachfront location. On top of that, it has a rooftop pool with stunning views.”

6. What’s more

This phrase is used to introduce additional information or a further point in support of the previous statement. It emphasizes that there is something else that should be considered.

  • For example, “The hotel has a great location and affordable rates. What’s more, it offers complimentary breakfast.”
  • In a persuasive argument, one might say, “The new policy will benefit the environment and reduce costs. What’s more, it will create new job opportunities.”
  • When discussing a recent event, someone might mention, “The concert was amazing. What’s more, I got to meet the lead singer backstage!”

7. Besides

This word is used to introduce an additional point or reason that supports or strengthens the previous statement. It suggests that there are other factors to consider.

  • For instance, “The car is fuel-efficient and has a spacious interior. Besides, it also comes with advanced safety features.”
  • In a discussion about vacation destinations, someone might say, “The beach is beautiful, and besides, there are plenty of activities for families.”
  • When comparing two options, one might argue, “Besides the lower price, this product also comes with a warranty.”

8. Also

This word is used to introduce another fact or point that supports or complements the previous statement. It indicates that there is something more to consider.

  • For example, “The restaurant has delicious food and friendly staff. Also, it offers outdoor seating with a great view.”
  • In a conversation about hobbies, someone might mention, “I enjoy playing the guitar. Also, I recently started learning the piano.”
  • When discussing job qualifications, one might say, “The candidate has relevant experience. Also, they have excellent communication skills.”

9. Further

This word is used to introduce additional information or evidence that supports or expands upon the previous statement. It emphasizes that there is more to be said.

  • For instance, “The study found a correlation between exercise and mental health. Further, it revealed that regular physical activity can reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression.”
  • In a research paper, one might state, “The findings support the hypothesis. Furthermore, they suggest potential applications in clinical settings.”
  • When discussing a book, someone might say, “The plot is engaging, and further, the characters are well-developed.”

10. And

This conjunction is used to add another point or piece of information that supports or reinforces the previous statement. It indicates that there is something else to consider.

  • For example, “The hotel has spacious rooms and a convenient location. And, it offers a complimentary shuttle service.”
  • In a discussion about a new product, someone might mention, “The smartphone has a sleek design and advanced features. Moreover, it has a long battery life.”
  • When describing a recipe, one might say, “The dish is flavorful, and, moreover, it is easy to prepare.”

11. As well

This term is used to add something to a previous statement or to indicate that something is in addition to what was already mentioned.

  • For example, “I enjoy playing soccer, and I like basketball as well.”
  • In a discussion about hobbies, someone might say, “I collect stamps, coins, and baseball cards as well.”
  • A person might mention, “I can speak English, Spanish, and French as well.”

12. Too

Similar to “as well,” this term is used to add something to a previous statement or to indicate that something is in addition to what was already mentioned.

  • For instance, “I love pizza, and I enjoy pasta too.”
  • In a conversation about favorite movies, someone might say, “I like action movies, and I enjoy comedies too.”
  • A person might mention, “I can play the guitar, and I can play the piano too.”

13. Additionally to

This phrase is used to introduce an additional item or idea, emphasizing that it is added to what was already mentioned.

  • For example, “She bought a new dress, shoes, and a handbag additionally to the accessories she already had.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “We need to consider the budget, timeline, and resources additionally to the scope.”
  • A person might mention, “I have experience in marketing and sales additionally to my background in finance.”

14. In addition

This phrase is used to introduce an additional item or idea, emphasizing that it is added to what was already mentioned.

  • For instance, “He studied hard and had good attendance in class. In addition, he participated in extracurricular activities.”
  • In a discussion about benefits, someone might say, “The job offers competitive salary and great benefits. In addition, there are opportunities for career growth.”
  • A person might mention, “She is talented, hardworking, and has excellent communication skills. In addition, she is a team player.”

15. Furthermore to

This phrase is used to introduce an additional item or idea, emphasizing that it is added to what was already mentioned.

  • For example, “The company provides a flexible work schedule and generous vacation policy. Furthermore, they offer wellness programs for employees.”
  • In a discussion about advantages, someone might say, “The product is durable, easy to use, and affordable. Furthermore, it comes with a lifetime warranty.”
  • A person might mention, “He is knowledgeable, experienced, and has strong leadership skills. Furthermore, he is a great communicator.”

16. Moreover to

This phrase is used to introduce additional information or points that support or reinforce what has already been stated. It is often used in formal or academic writing.

  • For example, “Moreover, the study found that exercise not only improves physical health but also has positive effects on mental well-being.”
  • In a business report, one might write, “Moreover, the company’s strong financial performance is expected to continue in the next quarter.”
  • A news article might state, “Moreover, the new policy will also benefit low-income families.”

17. And also

This phrase is a simple and informal way to add more information or emphasize an additional point. It is commonly used in both spoken and written language.

  • For instance, “I need to buy groceries, and also pick up my dry cleaning.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I enjoy playing soccer, and also basketball.”
  • A blogger might write, “I love traveling to new places and also exploring local cuisine.”

18. On top of that, too

This phrase is used to introduce another point or piece of information that adds to what has already been mentioned. It is often used to emphasize the significance or importance of the additional information.

  • For example, “The company has seen a significant increase in sales. On top of that, they have also expanded their product line.”
  • In a persuasive essay, one might argue, “The proposed solution will not only address the immediate problem but on top of that, it will also have long-term benefits.”
  • A presenter might say, “Our team has achieved great results this year. On top of that, we have also received positive feedback from our clients.”

19. Besides that

This phrase is used to introduce another point or fact that supports or adds to what has already been mentioned. It is a simple and straightforward way to provide additional information.

  • For instance, “The company offers a competitive salary. Besides that, they also provide excellent benefits.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “I enjoy playing soccer. Besides that, I also love swimming.”
  • A writer might mention, “The book received positive reviews from critics. Besides that, it also became a bestseller.”

20. Also, too

These words are used to introduce another point, fact, or piece of information that adds to what has already been stated. They are commonly used in both spoken and written language.

  • For example, “I enjoy hiking. Also, I love camping.”
  • In a presentation, one might say, “The company has achieved its sales targets. Also, it has exceeded customer satisfaction goals.”
  • A writer might mention, “The study found that exercise improves physical health. Also, it has positive effects on mental well-being.”

21. Further to that

This phrase is used to introduce additional information or points that support or expand upon a previous statement.

  • For example, “Further to that, I would like to add that the event will also include live music.”
  • In a discussion about travel plans, someone might say, “We have booked our flights, and further to that, we have also reserved a hotel.”
  • When presenting a proposal, a speaker might say, “We have analyzed the market trends, and further to that, we have identified potential areas for growth.”

22. As well as

This phrase is used to indicate that something is included in addition to what has already been mentioned.

  • For instance, “We offer a wide range of services, as well as personalized customer support.”
  • In a list of ingredients, a recipe might include, “Flour, sugar, eggs, as well as vanilla extract.”
  • When discussing qualifications, someone might say, “We are looking for candidates with experience in marketing as well as strong communication skills.”

23. Additionally, too

These words are used to introduce extra information or points that support or enhance a previous statement.

  • For example, “We have a great team, and additionally, we have a strong network of partners.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “Reducing carbon emissions is crucial, and additionally, we need to focus on sustainable agriculture.”
  • When presenting research findings, a scientist might say, “We have observed a decrease in species diversity, and additionally, we have identified the main factors contributing to this decline.”

24. In addition to this

This phrase is used to introduce another point or piece of information that is related to the previous statement.

  • For instance, “We offer free shipping, and in addition to this, we provide a 30-day money-back guarantee.”
  • In a discussion about job benefits, someone might say, “Employees receive health insurance coverage, and in addition to this, they have access to a wellness program.”
  • When describing a product, a salesperson might say, “The laptop has a long battery life, and in addition to this, it comes with a high-resolution display.”

25. Furthermore, also

These words are used to introduce a new point or piece of information that strengthens or supports the previous statement.

  • For example, “The project is on schedule, and furthermore, we have exceeded our target revenue.”
  • In a discussion about renewable energy, someone might say, “Solar power is a clean source of energy, and furthermore, it reduces reliance on fossil fuels.”
  • When presenting an argument, a debater might say, “The new policy promotes equality, and furthermore, it improves social cohesion.”

26. Plus, too

This phrase is used to add more information or emphasize something that has already been mentioned. It is often used to show agreement or support for a previous statement.

  • For example, “I love pizza. Plus, it’s my favorite food.”
  • In a conversation about a movie, someone might say, “The acting was great, and the special effects were impressive, too.”
  • A person might say, “I finished my work early. Plus, I helped my colleague with their project.”

27. On top of that, as well

This phrase is used to introduce another point or fact that is related to what has already been said. It emphasizes that there is even more to consider or take into account.

  • For instance, “He got a promotion at work. On top of that, he also won the lottery.”
  • In a discussion about travel, someone might say, “I visited Paris, London, and Rome. As well, I explored smaller towns in each country.”
  • A person might say, “I have a busy schedule. On top of that, I’m also taking care of my aging parents.”

28. Besides, also

These words are used to introduce additional information or reasons that support a previous statement. They emphasize that there are more factors to consider or that the speaker agrees with what has been said.

  • For example, “I don’t like seafood. Besides, I’m allergic to shellfish.”
  • In a conversation about hobbies, someone might say, “I enjoy reading. Also, I like to paint and play guitar.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not feeling well. Besides, I have a lot of work to do.”

29. Moreover, as well

This word is used to introduce another point or fact that strengthens or supports a previous statement. It emphasizes that there is additional evidence or information that should be taken into consideration.

  • For instance, “She is talented and hardworking. Moreover, she has a great personality.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “The ice caps are melting. As well, sea levels are rising.”
  • A person might say, “I enjoy hiking and swimming. Moreover, I like to try new outdoor activities.”

30. And, too

These words are used to add more information or include another item in a list. They show that there is something else that should be considered or mentioned.

  • For example, “I bought apples, oranges, and bananas. And, too, I picked up some strawberries.”
  • In a conversation about favorite books, someone might say, “I love mystery novels. And, too, I enjoy historical fiction.”
  • A person might say, “I have a dog and a cat. And, too, I have a pet fish.”

31. Additionally, as well

This term is used to add more information or to emphasize a point. It is often used to introduce an extra idea or detail.

  • For example, “Additionally, we should consider the environmental impact of our actions.”
  • In a discussion about benefits, someone might say, “The company offers a competitive salary and additionally, generous health benefits.”
  • When giving instructions, a teacher might say, “Complete the assignment and additionally, submit it online.”

32. In addition to that

This phrase is used to introduce an additional point or idea. It is often used to emphasize the importance or significance of the information being added.

  • For instance, “In addition to that, we should also consider the long-term effects.”
  • In a conversation about travel plans, someone might say, “We can visit the famous landmarks, and in addition to that, explore the local cuisine.”
  • When discussing a project, a team member might suggest, “In addition to that, we could also include a demonstration video.”

33. Furthermore, too

This term is used to introduce another piece of information or to add on to a previous point. It is often used to provide additional evidence or support for an argument.

  • For example, “Furthermore, the study also found a correlation between exercise and mental health.”
  • In a debate about climate change, someone might say, “The rising temperatures are a concern, and furthermore, the melting ice caps are causing sea levels to rise.”
  • When discussing a book, a reviewer might note, “The plot was engaging, and furthermore, the character development was exceptional.”

34. Plus, as well

This phrase is used to introduce an extra point or idea. It is often used to emphasize that something is being added to an existing list or set of information.

  • For instance, “Plus, we should also consider the potential risks involved.”
  • In a discussion about benefits, someone might say, “The job offers a competitive salary, plus, excellent health insurance.”
  • When talking about personal achievements, a person might say, “I won the race, and as well, set a new personal record.”

35. On top of that, additionally

This phrase is used to introduce another piece of information or to emphasize an additional point. It is often used to show that something is being added on to an existing situation or argument.

  • For example, “On top of that, the company also offers flexible work hours.”
  • In a discussion about the economy, someone might say, “Unemployment rates are high, and additionally, inflation is also a concern.”
  • When discussing a project, a team member might suggest, “We need to meet the deadline, and on top of that, deliver a high-quality product.”

36. Besides, too

This term is used to add extra information or provide additional examples to support a previous statement. It is often used to emphasize a point or to introduce a new idea.

  • For example, “Besides, I also have experience in marketing.”
  • In a discussion about hobbies, someone might say, “Besides playing the piano, I also enjoy painting.”
  • A student might add, “Besides studying, I also work part-time to support myself.”

37. Moreover, also too

This term is used to introduce additional information or evidence that supports or strengthens a previous statement. It is often used in formal writing or when presenting a logical argument.

  • For instance, “Moreover, the study also found that exercise can improve mental health.”
  • In a business presentation, someone might say, “Moreover, our company has seen a significant increase in sales over the past year.”
  • A news article might state, “Moreover, the new policy is expected to benefit low-income families.”

38. And also, as well

This term is used to add more information or to introduce another point that is related to the previous statement. It is often used in casual conversation or informal writing.

  • For example, “I love hiking, and also enjoy swimming.”
  • In a discussion about food preferences, someone might say, “I like pizza, and also enjoy pasta.”
  • A person might add, “I work as a teacher, and also volunteer at a local animal shelter.”

39. Additionally, too as well

This term is used to introduce extra information or provide additional examples to support a previous statement. It is often used in formal writing or when presenting a logical argument.

  • For instance, “Additionally, the study also found that diet plays a crucial role in overall health.”
  • In a research paper, someone might state, “Additionally, previous studies have shown similar results.”
  • An article might mention, “Additionally, the company plans to expand its operations in the coming year.”

40. In addition to this, also

This term is used to add more information or provide additional examples that support a previous statement. It is often used in formal writing or when presenting a logical argument.

  • For example, “In addition to this, the company also offers free shipping.”
  • In a discussion about travel, someone might say, “In addition to this, I also enjoy exploring local cuisine.”
  • A person might add, “In addition to this, I have experience in project management.”

41. Furthermore, also too

This term is used to introduce additional information or to emphasize a point that has already been made. It is often used in formal or academic writing.

  • For example, “Furthermore, the study found that exercise can improve cognitive function.”
  • In a business presentation, one might say, “Furthermore, our company has seen a significant increase in sales.”
  • A politician might use this term to strengthen their argument, saying, “Furthermore, this policy will benefit the economy as a whole.”

42. Plus, too as well

These terms are used to indicate something is being added to what has already been mentioned. They are commonly used in both formal and informal contexts.

  • For instance, “Plus, the package includes a free gift.”
  • In a conversation about travel plans, someone might say, “I’m going to Paris next month. Plus, I’ll be visiting London as well.”
  • A student might explain their decision to join a club, saying, “I wanted to improve my leadership skills, and it’s a fun activity too.”

43. On top of that, as well as

These phrases are used to introduce additional information or to emphasize something that has been previously stated. They are often used in formal or persuasive writing.

  • For example, “On top of that, the company offers a generous benefits package.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “As well as reducing carbon emissions, we need to invest in renewable energy.”
  • A salesperson might highlight the features of a product, saying, “This smartphone has a large screen, great camera, and on top of that, it’s waterproof.”

44. Moreoverly

This term is a less commonly used variation of “moreover.” It is used to introduce an additional point or to emphasize something that has already been mentioned. It is more formal in tone.

  • For instance, “Moreoverly, the study found that the new treatment was more effective.”
  • In a business report, one might say, “Moreoverly, the company’s profits have been steadily increasing.”
  • A researcher might use this term to highlight a significant finding, saying, “Moreoverly, the study revealed a correlation between sleep quality and mental health.”

45. In the same vein

This phrase is used to introduce a related point or to draw a parallel with what has been previously mentioned. It is often used in formal writing or speeches.

  • For example, “In the same vein, the author argues that education is essential for social progress.”
  • In a discussion about different art movements, someone might say, “Cubism and surrealism, in the same vein, challenged traditional artistic conventions.”
  • A presenter might use this phrase to connect different ideas, saying, “In the same vein, we can apply these principles to other areas of our lives.”

46. Not to mention

This phrase is used to introduce additional information or points that should be considered.

  • For example, “She is incredibly talented, not to mention hardworking.”
  • In a discussion about travel, someone might say, “The city has beautiful architecture, not to mention amazing food.”
  • Another might add, “The concert tickets are expensive, not to mention the cost of parking.”

47. Equally important

This phrase is used to emphasize the importance of a particular point or idea, suggesting that it is on par with other important factors.

  • For instance, “Studying is important for good grades, but equally important is getting enough sleep.”
  • In a conversation about teamwork, someone might say, “Communication is crucial, but equally important is trust and collaboration.”
  • Another might add, “Skills and experience are important in a job candidate, but equally important is cultural fit.”

48. Moreover to that

This phrase is used to introduce additional information or points that support or strengthen the previous statement.

  • For example, “She is incredibly talented, moreover to that, she is also a great leader.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “Reducing carbon emissions is crucial, moreover to that, we also need to invest in renewable energy.”
  • Another might add, “Exercise is important for physical health, moreover to that, it also has mental health benefits.”

49. On top of everything

This phrase is used to add something to a list of things that have already been mentioned, often implying that it is an extra burden or challenge.

  • For instance, “I have a busy day at work, and on top of everything, I have to pick up my kids from school.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might say, “We have rent, bills, and on top of everything, unexpected medical expenses.”
  • Another might add, “I have a lot of responsibilities at home, and on top of everything, I’m also studying for a degree.”

50. Furthermore to that

This phrase is used to introduce additional information or points that support or expand on the previous statement.

  • For example, “She is incredibly talented, furthermore to that, she is also a skilled writer.”
  • In a discussion about sustainable living, someone might say, “Reducing waste is important, furthermore to that, we should also focus on reducing our energy consumption.”
  • Another might add, “Eating a balanced diet is important, furthermore to that, regular exercise is also crucial for overall health.”

51. Additionally to that

This phrase is used to introduce additional information or points that further support or enhance the previous statement or argument.

  • For example, “The company has seen a significant increase in sales. Additionally to that, they have expanded their product line.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “Reducing carbon emissions is crucial. Additionally to that, we need to invest in renewable energy sources.”
  • Another example could be, “She is a talented singer. Additionally to that, she is also a skilled dancer.”

52. What’s more to that

This phrase is used to add another point or piece of information to what has already been stated.

  • For instance, “The new restaurant has a great menu. What’s more to that, the prices are very affordable.”
  • In a debate about education, someone might argue, “Students should have access to free textbooks. What’s more to that, online resources can also be made available.”
  • Another example could be, “He is a hardworking employee. What’s more to that, he is always willing to help his colleagues.”

53. Too to that

This phrase is used to introduce something that is added to what has already been mentioned or discussed.

  • For example, “The team has a strong offense. Too to that, their defense is also very solid.”
  • In a conversation about travel destinations, someone might say, “Paris is known for its beautiful architecture. Too to that, it offers a vibrant nightlife.”
  • Another example could be, “She is a talented artist. Too to that, she is also a skilled writer.”

54. As well to that

This phrase is used to introduce additional information or points that further support or enhance the previous statement or argument.

  • For instance, “The company has seen a significant increase in sales. As well to that, they have expanded their product line.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “Reducing carbon emissions is crucial. As well to that, we need to invest in renewable energy sources.”
  • Another example could be, “She is a talented singer. As well to that, she is also a skilled dancer.”

55. Further to this

This phrase is used to add more information or details to what has already been mentioned.

  • For example, “The research findings are promising. Further to this, additional studies are being conducted.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “Smartphones have revolutionized communication. Further to this, they have also impacted various industries.”
  • Another example could be, “He has a strong academic background. Further to this, he has practical experience in the field.”

56. Likewise

This is a word used to indicate agreement or similarity with a previous statement or action. It is often used to show that the same applies to the current situation.

  • For example, if someone says, “I love pizza,” you can respond with “Likewise!”
  • In a conversation about favorite movies, you might say, “I enjoyed that film too. Likewise, it was a great story.”
  • If someone thanks you for a favor, you can reply with “Likewise, I appreciate your help.”

57. Moreover, let’s not forget

This phrase is used to introduce an additional point or idea, emphasizing that it should not be ignored or forgotten.

  • For instance, in a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “Moreover, let’s not forget that deforestation also contributes to the problem.”
  • When discussing the benefits of exercise, you might mention, “Exercise improves cardiovascular health. Moreover, let’s not forget that it also helps with mental well-being.”
  • In a debate about a controversial topic, you could add, “Moreover, let’s not forget that there are valid arguments on both sides.”

58. Not only that, but also

This phrase is used to introduce another point or idea, emphasizing that it is in addition to the previous one.

  • For example, if someone says, “I love ice cream,” you can respond with “Not only that, but also cake!”
  • In a discussion about travel destinations, you might say, “Not only that, but also the food in that country is amazing.”
  • If someone mentions the benefits of a particular exercise, you can add, “Not only that, but also it helps improve flexibility.”

59. Additionally, it should be noted

This phrase is used to introduce an additional point or idea, emphasizing that it is important to mention or take into consideration.

  • For instance, in a presentation about a product, the speaker might say, “Additionally, it should be noted that the product is eco-friendly.”
  • When discussing the advantages of a new technology, you might mention, “Additionally, it should be noted that it also improves efficiency.”
  • In an argument about the impact of social media, you could add, “Additionally, it should be noted that it can also connect people from different parts of the world.”

60. Furthermore, it is worth mentioning

This phrase is used to introduce an additional point or idea, emphasizing that it is worth mentioning or highlighting.

  • For example, if someone talks about the benefits of a healthy diet, you can add, “Furthermore, it is worth mentioning that it also improves skin health.”
  • In a discussion about renewable energy, you might say, “Furthermore, it is worth mentioning that it reduces carbon emissions.”
  • If someone mentions the advantages of a particular software, you can highlight, “Furthermore, it is worth mentioning that it also has a user-friendly interface.”

61. Moreover, it is important to highlight

This phrase is used to introduce additional information or emphasize a point that supports the previous statement. It is often used in formal or academic writing.

  • For example, “Moreover, it is important to highlight the potential environmental impact of this project.”
  • In a research paper, a writer might state, “Moreover, the results of this study demonstrate a clear correlation between the two variables.”
  • A speaker in a presentation might say, “Moreover, it is important to consider the long-term implications of this decision.”

62. Furthermore, it should be pointed out

This phrase is used to introduce a new point or add more information to support the previous statement. It is similar in meaning to “in addition” or “furthermore” and is commonly used in both formal and informal writing.

  • For instance, “Furthermore, it should be pointed out that this policy has been successful in other countries.”
  • A writer might use this phrase to add more evidence to their argument, such as “Furthermore, it should be pointed out that multiple studies have shown similar results.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “Furthermore, it should be pointed out that this problem is not isolated to our community.”

63. Additionally, it is worth noting

This phrase is used to introduce an additional point or highlight something that is important to consider. It is often used in both formal and informal writing.

  • For example, “Additionally, it is worth noting that this product is made from sustainable materials.”
  • A writer might use this phrase to draw attention to a specific aspect of their argument, such as “Additionally, it is worth noting the economic benefits of this proposed policy.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Additionally, it is worth noting that this event is open to all ages.”

64. Moreover, it is crucial to mention

This phrase is used to introduce additional information or emphasize a point that supports the previous statement. It is similar in meaning to “in addition” or “moreover” and is commonly used in both formal and informal writing.

  • For instance, “Moreover, it is crucial to mention the potential risks associated with this activity.”
  • A writer might use this phrase to provide further evidence or support for their argument, such as “Moreover, it is crucial to mention the historical context of this event.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “Moreover, it is crucial to mention the impact this decision will have on future generations.”

65. Furthermore, it is essential to highlight

This phrase is used to introduce additional information or emphasize a point that supports the previous statement. It is similar in meaning to “in addition” or “furthermore” and is commonly used in both formal and informal writing.

  • For example, “Furthermore, it is essential to highlight the importance of education in addressing this issue.”
  • A writer might use this phrase to provide further evidence or support for their argument, such as “Furthermore, it is essential to highlight the potential benefits of this policy.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Furthermore, it is essential to highlight the impact this decision will have on our community.”

66. Additionally, it is crucial to highlight

This phrase is used to emphasize the importance of bringing attention to something. It is often used to introduce additional information or points that support or strengthen a previous statement.

  • For example, “Additionally, it is crucial to highlight the impact of climate change on our environment.”
  • In a discussion about a new policy, someone might say, “Additionally, it is crucial to highlight the potential consequences of this decision.”
  • A writer might use this phrase to transition to a new topic, such as, “Additionally, it is crucial to highlight the benefits of regular exercise.”

67. Not only that

This phrase is used to add more information or evidence to support a previous statement. It is often used to emphasize that there are additional points to consider or that there is more to the story.

  • For instance, “Not only that, but the company also offers free shipping for all orders.”
  • In a debate about climate change, someone might argue, “Not only that, but recent studies have shown a significant increase in extreme weather events.”
  • A person discussing the benefits of a healthy lifestyle might say, “Not only that, but regular exercise can also improve mental well-being.”
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