Top 25 Slang For Generalize – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing general ideas or concepts, having the right slang can make all the difference in getting your point across. In this article, we’ve gathered some of the most popular slang terms used to generalize situations, people, or things. Whether you’re a language enthusiast or just looking to stay up-to-date with the latest trends, we’ve got you covered with this handy list. So, get ready to level up your communication game and dive into the world of slang for generalize!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Lump together

This phrase means to group or categorize things or people without considering their individual differences or nuances.

  • For example, “Don’t lump all politicians together – they have different beliefs and values.”
  • In a discussion about music genres, someone might say, “We can’t just lump all rap music together – there are different sub-genres with unique styles.”
  • A person criticizing a news article might comment, “The author lumps together all millennials as lazy and entitled, which is unfair and inaccurate.”

2. Paint with a broad brush

This expression means to make broad and generalized statements or assumptions without considering the specific details or variations.

  • For instance, “Don’t paint all lawyers with a broad brush – there are ethical and dedicated professionals in the field.”
  • In a conversation about a particular group of people, one might caution, “It’s important not to paint everyone in that community with a broad brush – there are diverse opinions and experiences.”
  • A person criticizing a political party might say, “The candidate’s speech painted the opposing party with a broad brush, ignoring the complexity of their policies.”

3. Blanket statement

This term refers to a statement that applies to a whole group or situation without considering individual variations or exceptions.

  • For example, “It’s a blanket statement to say all teenagers are lazy – there are hardworking and ambitious teens as well.”
  • In a discussion about dietary choices, someone might argue, “Making a blanket statement that all carbohydrates are bad oversimplifies the science of nutrition.”
  • A person critiquing a company’s policy might comment, “Their statement that ‘we value our customers above all else’ is just a blanket statement without any concrete actions to back it up.”

4. Sweepingly generalize

This phrase means to make general statements or assumptions without considering the specific details or individual differences.

  • For instance, “She sweepingly generalized that all men are bad at expressing emotions, which is not true for everyone.”
  • In a conversation about cultural differences, one might caution, “Let’s not sweepingly generalize about an entire country based on a few individuals.”
  • A person criticizing a social trend might say, “The media’s portrayal of millennials often sweepingly generalizes their attitudes and behaviors.”

5. Stereotype

A stereotype is a widely-held but oversimplified belief or idea about a particular group or category of people.

  • For example, “It’s important to challenge stereotypes about gender roles and expectations.”
  • In a discussion about different cultures, someone might say, “Stereotypes can perpetuate harmful biases and prevent understanding.”
  • A person critiquing a movie might comment, “The film relies on stereotypes to portray certain characters, which can reinforce negative perceptions.”

6. Overgeneralize

To make broad or sweeping generalizations without considering individual differences or specific details. This term is often used to describe someone who assumes that a general statement applies to every individual or situation.

  • For example, someone might say, “Don’t overgeneralize about millennials. Not all of them are lazy and entitled.”
  • In a discussion about stereotypes, a person might argue, “It’s important not to overgeneralize based on race or ethnicity.”
  • Another might caution, “Overgeneralizing can lead to misunderstandings and perpetuate stereotypes.”

7. All-encompassing

This term describes something that is comprehensive and includes all aspects or individuals within a particular category or context.

  • For instance, a person might say, “This policy is designed to be all-encompassing and address every possible scenario.”
  • In a discussion about a new educational program, someone might comment, “We need an all-encompassing approach that considers the needs of all students.”
  • Another might suggest, “Let’s create an all-encompassing guide that covers every topic related to this subject.”

8. Across the board

This term describes something that applies to all individuals or situations without any exceptions or variations.

  • For example, a person might say, “The new policy applies across the board to all employees.”
  • In a discussion about salary increases, someone might argue, “We need fair and consistent raises across the board.”
  • Another might comment, “Let’s implement changes that benefit everyone across the board.”

9. Paint everyone with the same brush

To unfairly or inaccurately categorize or judge a group of people based on the actions or characteristics of a few individuals. This term implies that the same negative view or assumption is applied to everyone within the group.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Don’t paint all politicians with the same brush. There are good and bad individuals in every profession.”
  • In a discussion about stereotypes, a person might argue, “We need to avoid painting all members of a certain race with the same brush.”
  • Another might caution, “It’s important to recognize individual differences and not paint everyone with the same brush.”

10. Broad generalization

This term refers to a general statement or assumption that lacks specific details or nuances. It often oversimplifies a complex topic or fails to consider individual differences.

  • For example, someone might say, “Making broad generalizations about an entire generation is unfair and inaccurate.”
  • In a discussion about cultural differences, a person might comment, “We should avoid broad generalizations and instead focus on understanding individual experiences.”
  • Another might suggest, “Let’s gather more data before making broad generalizations about this issue.”

11. All-inclusive

This term is used to describe something that includes or covers everything or everyone. It suggests that nothing or no one is left out.

  • For example, a travel package might advertise, “Enjoy our all-inclusive vacation package with meals, accommodations, and activities included.”
  • In a conversation about diversity, someone might say, “We need to create an all-inclusive environment where everyone feels welcome.”
  • A company might promote their product as “all-inclusive” to indicate that it caters to a wide range of needs or preferences.
See also  Top 26 Slang For Somber – Meaning & Usage

12. Make sweeping statements

This phrase refers to making statements that are broad, general, or exaggerated, without considering specific details or nuances.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Don’t make sweeping statements about an entire group of people based on a few individuals.”
  • In a debate, a person might argue, “It’s important to back up your claims with evidence instead of making sweeping statements.”
  • A teacher might caution a student, “Avoid making sweeping statements in your essay and provide specific examples to support your points.”

13. Make blanket assumptions

This phrase means making assumptions that are applied to an entire group of people or things without considering individual differences or circumstances.

  • For example, someone might say, “Don’t make blanket assumptions about someone’s personality based on their appearance.”
  • In a discussion about stereotypes, a person might argue, “We need to challenge and question our blanket assumptions about different cultures.”
  • A manager might advise their team, “Avoid making blanket assumptions about our customers and instead, gather data to understand their specific needs.”

14. Take a broad view

This phrase means to consider a wide range of perspectives, possibilities, or factors when looking at a situation or making a decision.

  • For instance, a leader might say, “Let’s take a broad view of this issue and consider all the potential outcomes.”
  • In a brainstorming session, someone might suggest, “We should take a broad view and explore ideas from different angles.”
  • A journalist might write, “Taking a broad view of the current political landscape, it’s clear that there are many factors influencing public opinion.”

15. Cast a wide net

This phrase means to include or consider a large or diverse group of people, ideas, or possibilities.

  • For example, a company might say, “We’re casting a wide net in our job search to attract a diverse range of candidates.”
  • In a marketing campaign, a brand might aim to “cast a wide net” to reach a broad audience.
  • A teacher might encourage their students to “cast a wide net” when conducting research to gather a variety of sources.
See also  Top 22 Slang For Actually – Meaning & Usage

16. Group together

This phrase means to bring together or merge multiple things or people into a single group or category. It is often used when discussing similarities or commonalities among different entities.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let’s group together the students who have finished their assignments.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might suggest, “We should group together our marketing and sales teams for this project.”
  • A researcher might note, “It’s important to group together similar data points for accurate analysis.”

17. Assume across the board

This phrase means to make a broad assumption or generalization that applies to everyone or everything within a certain category or context. It implies that the assumption is made without considering individual differences or specific circumstances.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I assume across the board that all politicians are corrupt.”
  • In a debate about gender roles, a person might argue, “We can’t assume across the board that all men are aggressive.”
  • A journalist might caution, “It’s important not to assume across the board when reporting on a specific community.”

18. Categorize broadly

This phrase refers to the act of classifying or labeling something or someone based on generalized characteristics or traits. It implies that the categorization is done without considering individual variations or nuances.

  • For example, someone might say, “Don’t categorize broadly and assume all millennials are lazy.”
  • In a discussion about cultural differences, a person might argue, “We shouldn’t categorize broadly and assume all Asians are good at math.”
  • A social scientist might caution, “Categorizing broadly can perpetuate harmful stereotypes and biases.”

19. Treat as a whole

This phrase means to consider or deal with something as a single entity or unit, without taking into account individual differences or specific details. It implies that the treatment or analysis is done on a collective level.

  • For instance, a manager might say, “Let’s treat the team as a whole and focus on their overall performance.”
  • In a discussion about healthcare, someone might argue, “We need to treat mental and physical health as a whole.”
  • A therapist might advise, “It’s important to treat the family system as a whole when addressing relationship issues.”

20. Make overarching statements

This phrase refers to the act of making broad or all-encompassing statements that apply to a wide range of situations or individuals. It implies that the statements are made without considering specific details or exceptions.

  • For example, someone might say, “Let’s avoid making overarching statements about an entire generation.”
  • In a discussion about education, a person might argue, “We can’t make overarching statements about the effectiveness of standardized testing.”
  • A scientist might caution, “Making overarching statements can oversimplify complex phenomena and hinder accurate understanding.”

21. Sum up

When you “sum up” something, you are providing a concise and condensed version of the main points or ideas. It is a way to generalize the information or concept.

  • For example, “Can you sum up the main arguments in the debate?”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “Let me sum up the key takeaways from today’s discussion.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Can you sum up the main events of the story?”

22. Cover all bases

When you “cover all bases,” you are ensuring that nothing is missed or overlooked. It means to include or address every possible option or aspect of a situation.

  • For instance, “Before making a decision, let’s cover all bases and consider all potential outcomes.”
  • In a planning meeting, someone might say, “We need to cover all bases to ensure the event runs smoothly.”
  • A coach might advise their team, “Make sure you cover all bases in your preparation for the game.”

23. Encompassing all

When something is described as “encompassing all,” it means that it includes or encompasses everything or everyone within a particular category or scope. It is a way to generalize that nothing or no one is excluded.

  • For example, “The report provides an encompassing view of the current market trends.”
  • In a discussion about a topic, someone might say, “We need to consider all opinions and perspectives, encompassing all viewpoints.”
  • A company might advertise their product as “encompassing all your needs” to indicate it caters to a wide range of requirements.
See also  Top 67 Slang For Apathy – Meaning & Usage

24. Broadly speaking

When you say “broadly speaking,” you are making a general statement or speaking in general terms. It is a way to provide a broad overview or summary without going into specific details.

  • For instance, “Broadly speaking, exercise is good for your health.”
  • In a presentation, someone might say, “Broadly speaking, the market is trending upwards.”
  • A teacher might explain, “Broadly speaking, the Industrial Revolution led to significant social and economic changes.”

25. Universally true

When something is described as “universally true,” it means that it is valid or applicable in all situations or circumstances. It is a way to generalize that a statement or principle holds true universally.

  • For example, “It is universally true that gravity pulls objects towards the center of the Earth.”
  • In a discussion about human rights, someone might assert, “Respect for individual autonomy is universally true.”
  • A philosopher might argue, “The pursuit of happiness is universally true as a fundamental human desire.”