Top 31 Slang For Get Around – Meaning & Usage

Get around is a versatile phrase that can mean different things depending on the context. Whether you’re talking about transportation, finding your way, or socializing, this slang term is a must-know for anyone looking to stay current with the latest lingo. Let us guide you through a list of trendy phrases and expressions that will help you navigate conversations with ease and confidence. Get ready to level up your slang game and impress your friends with your newfound knowledge!

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1. Cruise

To “cruise” means to travel in a relaxed or smooth manner. It can refer to driving or sailing at a steady pace without any particular destination in mind.

  • For example, “Let’s cruise along the coast and enjoy the scenic views.”
  • A person might say, “I love to cruise around town with the windows down and the music blasting.”
  • In a conversation about road trips, someone might suggest, “We should cruise down Route 66 and explore all the iconic stops along the way.”

2. Roam

To “roam” means to move about without any specific purpose or destination. It implies a sense of freedom and exploration.

  • For instance, “I like to roam around the city and discover hidden gems.”
  • A traveler might say, “I plan to roam through Europe and experience different cultures.”
  • In a discussion about adventure, someone might comment, “I have a strong desire to roam the world and see all its wonders.”

3. Trek

To “trek” means to embark on a long and arduous journey, often on foot or in a rugged terrain. It implies a sense of endurance and perseverance.

  • For example, “We decided to trek through the mountains and reach the summit.”
  • A hiker might say, “I love to trek in remote wilderness areas and disconnect from civilization.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might share, “I trekked across the Great Wall of China and it was an unforgettable experience.”

4. Bounce

To “bounce” means to leave a place quickly or abruptly. It can refer to physically departing from a location or ending a conversation or interaction.

  • For instance, “I have to bounce, I have a meeting to attend.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s bounce from this party, it’s getting boring.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might share, “I had to bounce from that toxic friendship for my own well-being.”

5. Wander

To “wander” means to move about without a fixed course or destination. It implies a sense of curiosity and exploration.

  • For example, “I love to wander through the streets of a new city and discover its hidden gems.”
  • A traveler might say, “I enjoy wandering in nature and getting lost in its beauty.”
  • In a conversation about adventure, someone might comment, “I have a strong desire to wander the world and see where life takes me.”

6. Explore

To explore means to travel through or across an area in order to learn about or discover new things. It can also refer to trying out new experiences or ideas.

  • For example, a travel blogger might write, “Explore the hidden gems of Paris with these off-the-beaten-path recommendations.”
  • A friend might suggest, “Let’s explore the local food scene and try out different restaurants.”
  • Someone might say, “I love to explore different genres of music and discover new artists.”

To navigate means to find one’s way through or around a place or a situation. It can also refer to understanding or dealing with a complex situation or problem.

  • For instance, a hiker might say, “We need to navigate through this dense forest to reach the summit.”
  • In a discussion about a challenging project, someone might mention, “We had to navigate various obstacles to complete the task.”
  • A person giving directions might say, “Navigate through the city streets until you reach the main intersection.”

8. Roost

To roost means to settle or stay in a particular place, especially for a temporary period. It can also refer to hanging out or spending time in a specific location.

  • For example, a group of friends might say, “Let’s roost at the park and have a picnic.”
  • A person discussing their weekend plans might say, “I’m going to roost at my friend’s house and watch movies.”
  • Someone might mention, “I love to roost at coffee shops and work on my laptop.”

9. Gallivant

To gallivant means to travel or wander around in a carefree or playful manner. It implies a sense of adventure or exploration.

  • For instance, a traveler might say, “I love to gallivant around Europe and discover hidden gems.”
  • A friend might suggest, “Let’s gallivant through the city streets and explore different neighborhoods.”
  • Someone might mention, “I enjoy gallivanting in nature and discovering new hiking trails.”

10. Traverse

To traverse means to travel across or through a geographical area or to cross a difficult or challenging terrain. It can also refer to moving through or dealing with a difficult situation.

  • For example, a mountaineer might say, “We need to traverse the icy slopes to reach the summit.”
  • In a discussion about a complicated legal case, someone might mention, “The lawyers had to traverse through a maze of evidence.”
  • A person giving directions might say, “Traverse the bridge and continue straight until you reach the intersection.”

11. Ramble

To move about without a specific destination or purpose. “Ramble” often implies a leisurely or casual manner of movement.

  • For instance, a traveler might say, “I love to ramble through the streets of a new city, exploring all the hidden corners.”
  • A person describing their weekend plans might say, “I’m just going to ramble around the park and enjoy the nice weather.”
  • In a conversation about hiking, someone might mention, “I enjoy finding new trails where I can ramble through nature.”

12. Drift

To move or wander in a slow and relaxed manner, without a fixed course or purpose. “Drift” often implies a lack of direction or intention.

  • For example, a person might say, “I like to drift along the beach, feeling the sand between my toes.”
  • A person describing their mindset during a vacation might say, “I just want to drift from place to place and see where the day takes me.”
  • In a conversation about exploring a new city, someone might suggest, “Let’s just drift through the streets and see what we discover.”

13. Saunter

To walk in a slow, relaxed, and confident manner. “Saunter” often implies a sense of enjoyment or self-assuredness in one’s movement.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I like to saunter down the street, taking in the sights and sounds of the city.”
  • A person describing their daily routine might say, “I always make time to saunter through the park and enjoy nature.”
  • In a conversation about exploring a new neighborhood, someone might suggest, “Let’s saunter through the local shops and see what catches our eye.”

14. Hike

To walk or trek in natural environments, often on trails or paths. “Hike” typically involves more physical exertion and is associated with outdoor activities and exploration.

  • For example, a person might say, “I enjoy hiking in the mountains and experiencing the beauty of nature.”
  • A person planning a weekend trip might say, “Let’s find a nearby national park and go for a hike.”
  • In a conversation about fitness, someone might mention, “Hiking is a great way to stay active and connect with the outdoors.”

15. Stroll

To walk in a relaxed and unhurried manner, often for pleasure or leisure. “Stroll” suggests a gentle and enjoyable pace.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I like to take a leisurely stroll through the park to clear my mind.”
  • A person describing their evening routine might say, “After dinner, I like to take a stroll around the neighborhood and enjoy the fresh air.”
  • In a conversation about exploring a new city, someone might suggest, “Let’s take a stroll through the downtown area and see what catches our attention.”

16. Circulate

This term means to move or travel around a particular area or place. It can also refer to information or news spreading among a group of people.

  • For example, “I like to circulate around the party and talk to different people.”
  • In a discussion about rumors, someone might say, “I heard some interesting gossip circulating at work.”
  • A teacher might instruct their students, “Please circulate around the room and ask your classmates for their opinions on the topic.”

17. Perambulate

This word is a fancy way of saying “walk” or “stroll.” It implies a leisurely or relaxed pace while moving around.

  • For instance, “Let’s perambulate through the park and enjoy the fresh air.”
  • In a conversation about exercise, someone might say, “I try to perambulate for at least 30 minutes every day.”
  • A travel blogger might recommend, “When visiting a new city, take some time to perambulate through the streets and discover hidden gems.”

18. Move about

This phrase simply means to travel or go from one place to another. It can be used to describe physical movement or the act of changing locations.

  • For example, “I like to move about and explore different cities.”
  • In a discussion about job opportunities, someone might say, “I’m open to moving about to find the right opportunity.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Be careful when you move about the house, so you don’t trip over anything.”

19. Meander

This word suggests a wandering or zigzagging movement without a specific destination or purpose. It can also describe someone’s speech or writing that goes off on tangents.

  • For instance, “Let’s meander through the streets and see where we end up.”
  • In a conversation about storytelling, someone might say, “I love how the author’s words meander and take unexpected turns.”
  • A friend might describe their road trip, saying, “We decided to meander along the coastal highway and explore different towns.”

20. Prowl

This term implies moving around cautiously or stealthily, often with the intention of searching or hunting for something.

  • For example, “The cat prowled around the backyard, looking for prey.”
  • In a discussion about safety, someone might say, “It’s important to stay aware of your surroundings and avoid prowling in dangerous areas.”
  • A detective might describe their investigation, saying, “We had to prowl the neighborhood to gather evidence and information.”

21. Journey

This term refers to a trip or travel from one place to another. It can be used to describe both short and long distances.

  • For example, “We took a journey to the beach for the weekend.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m planning a journey around the world.”
  • A traveler might share, “I’ve had some incredible journeys exploring different countries.”

22. Stray

To stray means to wander or roam without a specific destination or purpose. It can also imply deviating from a planned route or path.

  • For instance, “We decided to stray from the main road and explore the nearby forest.”
  • A hiker might say, “I like to stray off the beaten path and discover hidden gems.”
  • Someone might comment, “Don’t stray too far, we might get lost.”

23. Circumnavigate

Circumnavigate means to go around or bypass something, usually in a circular or indirect manner. It can be used to describe traveling around a physical obstacle or finding an alternative route.

  • For example, “We had to circumnavigate the construction site to reach our destination.”
  • A sailor might say, “Our goal is to circumnavigate the globe.”
  • Someone might suggest, “Let’s circumnavigate the traffic by taking a different route.”

24. Tramp

To tramp means to walk or hike, often over long distances or rough terrain. It can also imply a sense of adventure or exploration.

  • For instance, “We decided to tramp through the forest to reach the summit.”
  • A nature enthusiast might say, “I enjoy tramping in the mountains to connect with nature.”
  • Someone might comment, “My feet are sore from tramping all day.”

25. Jaunt

A jaunt refers to a short trip or outing, often taken for pleasure or leisure. It implies a sense of enjoyment and relaxation.

  • For example, “We went on a jaunt to the park to enjoy the sunny weather.”
  • Someone might say, “I like to take a quick jaunt to the coffee shop in the morning.”
  • A traveler might share, “I always try to squeeze in a jaunt to a local market when visiting a new city.”

26. Traipse

To traipse means to walk or move around casually or aimlessly. It often implies a lack of purpose or direction in one’s movement.

  • For example, “After work, I like to traipse around the city and explore new neighborhoods.”
  • Someone might say, “I traipsed through the park, enjoying the scenery and fresh air.”
  • A person describing their weekend activities might say, “I spent the day traipsing through the farmer’s market, trying different foods and browsing the stalls.”

27. Sashay

Sashay refers to moving or walking in a confident and stylish manner. It often implies a certain level of flamboyance or showmanship.

  • For instance, “She sashayed into the room, turning heads with her elegant dress.”
  • During a dance performance, a judge might comment, “He really knows how to sashay across the stage with grace and confidence.”
  • A fashion blogger might write, “Learn how to sashay down the runway like a supermodel with these tips.”

28. Strut

To strut means to walk with a proud and confident demeanor. It often implies a sense of self-assuredness and swagger.

  • For example, “He struts down the street like he owns the place.”
  • A person might say, “I love watching peacocks strut their stuff, showing off their beautiful feathers.”
  • A friend might comment, “You really know how to strut your stuff on the dance floor!”

29. Promenade

Promenade refers to taking a leisurely walk, especially in a public place. It often implies a relaxed and enjoyable stroll.

  • For instance, “Let’s go for a promenade along the beach and watch the sunset.”
  • During a visit to a new city, a tourist might say, “I love exploring the city by promenading through its parks and streets.”
  • A couple might plan to “dress up and go for a romantic promenade along the river.”
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30. Amble

To amble means to walk or move at a slow, relaxed pace. It often implies a lack of urgency or haste.

  • For example, “They ambled through the forest, enjoying the peacefulness of nature.”
  • A person might say, “I like to amble through the farmer’s market, taking my time to browse and choose the best produce.”
  • On a lazy Sunday afternoon, someone might suggest, “Let’s amble around the neighborhood and see what’s going on.”

31. Waddle

To “waddle” means to move in a clumsy or unsteady manner, usually with short steps or a side-to-side motion. The term is often used to describe the way certain animals, such as penguins or ducks, walk.

  • For example, “The toddler waddled across the room, trying to keep their balance.”
  • In a humorous context, someone might say, “After eating too much at the buffet, I had to waddle back to my seat.”
  • A person imitating a penguin might jokingly say, “Watch me waddle like a penguin!”