Top 48 Slang For Get Rid Of – Meaning & Usage

Tired of clutter and ready to declutter your life? Whether it’s old clothes, bad habits, or toxic relationships, knowing the right slang for “get rid of” can be a game-changer. Let us guide you through a list of trendy phrases that will help you clean house and start fresh. Get ready to level up your vocabulary and kick negativity to the curb!

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1. Ditch

To get rid of something or someone, often in a quick or careless manner.

  • For example, “I had to ditch my old car because it kept breaking down.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to ditch this boring party and go somewhere more fun.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you help me ditch these old clothes? I need to make room in my closet.”

2. Chuck

To dispose of something by throwing it away or discarding it.

  • For instance, “I’m going to chuck this broken toy in the trash.”
  • A person might say, “I need to chuck these old papers. They’re just taking up space.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you chuck these empty bottles in the recycling bin?”

3. Trash

To throw away or discard something as garbage or waste.

  • For example, “I’m going to trash these old magazines. They’re just cluttering up the house.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t trash that book. Donate it to a library instead.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you help me trash these empty food containers?”

4. Toss

To throw something away or get rid of it, often in a casual or hasty manner.

  • For instance, “I’m going to toss these old shoes. They’re worn out.”
  • A person might say, “I need to toss these expired groceries. They’re no longer safe to eat.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you toss this empty can in the recycling bin?”

5. Dump

To get rid of something or someone, often by discarding or disposing of them in a careless or abrupt manner.

  • For example, “I’m going to dump these old clothes in the donation bin.”
  • A person might say, “He dumped me without any explanation. I’m heartbroken.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you help me dump this furniture? It’s too big for my new apartment.”

6. Scrub

– “I need to scrub all the old files from my computer.”

7. Purge

– “I need to purge my closet and get rid of all the clothes I never wear.”

8. Jettison

– “The airline had to jettison some cargo to ensure the safety of the flight.”

9. Rid

– “He wanted to rid his life of toxic relationships.”

10. Dispose of

– “He disposed of the old furniture by donating it to a charity.”

11. Toss out

This phrase means to get rid of something or throw it away. It implies a casual or careless manner of discarding something.

  • For example, “I need to toss out these old magazines.”
  • A person cleaning out their closet might say, “I’m going to toss out all these old clothes.”
  • When decluttering, someone might decide to “toss out” items that are no longer needed.

12. Cast off

This term means to get rid of something or throw it away. It can also imply a sense of liberation or freeing oneself from something.

  • For instance, “It’s time to cast off these old habits.”
  • A person might say, “I cast off all the negative energy in my life.”
  • When letting go of unnecessary possessions, someone might declare, “I’m going to cast off all these things I don’t need.”

13. Clear out

To clear out means to remove or get rid of something, often by removing all of its contents or occupants.

  • For example, “I need to clear out this cluttered room.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s clear out all the old files from the storage room.”
  • When moving out of a house, someone might need to “clear out” all their belongings.

14. Shed

Shedding something means to get rid of it or discard it. It can also imply a sense of relief or letting go.

  • For instance, “I need to shed these extra pounds.”
  • A person might say, “I shed all the negative influences in my life.”
  • When decluttering, someone might decide to “shed” items that no longer serve a purpose.

15. Pitch

To pitch something means to throw it away or get rid of it. It implies a forceful or energetic action.

  • For example, “I’m going to pitch these old magazines.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s pitch all the expired food from the fridge.”
  • When cleaning up, someone might decide to “pitch” items that are no longer needed.

16. Unload

This term is often used to describe the act of getting rid of something unwanted or disposing of something no longer needed.

  • For example, “I need to unload these old clothes that don’t fit anymore.”
  • In a conversation about decluttering, someone might say, “I’m planning to unload all the unnecessary items in my house.”
  • A person frustrated with a difficult project might exclaim, “I can’t wait to unload this task and move on!”

17. Banish

This term implies a more deliberate and forceful act of getting rid of someone or something, often with the intention of permanently removing them.

  • For instance, “The evil queen banished the princess from the kingdom.”
  • In a discussion about negative emotions, someone might say, “I try to banish negativity from my life.”
  • A person dealing with pests might say, “I need to banish these ants from my kitchen.”

18. Chuck out

This term is a more informal and casual way of expressing the act of getting rid of something, often implying a lack of value or importance.

  • For example, “I’m going to chuck out these old magazines.”
  • In a conversation about cleaning, someone might say, “I need to chuck out all the expired food in my fridge.”
  • A person frustrated with a broken item might exclaim, “I’m just going to chuck it out and buy a new one!”

19. Scrap

This term is often used to describe the act of getting rid of something by throwing it away or getting rid of it completely.

  • For instance, “I’m going to scrap this old car and buy a new one.”
  • In a discussion about decluttering, someone might say, “I’m planning to scrap all the unnecessary paperwork.”
  • A person frustrated with a failed project might say, “I’m going to scrap this idea and start fresh.”

20. Eliminate

This term implies a more thorough and permanent act of getting rid of something or someone.

  • For example, “We need to eliminate all sources of contamination.”
  • In a conversation about weight loss, someone might say, “I’m trying to eliminate unhealthy foods from my diet.”
  • A person dealing with a pest infestation might exclaim, “We need to eliminate these bugs from our home!”

21. Tidy up

This phrase means to organize or clean a space, often by removing unnecessary items or clutter.

  • For example, “I need to tidy up my room before guests arrive.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll tidy up the kitchen after dinner.”
  • Someone might ask, “Could you help me tidy up the living room?”

22. Do away with

To completely remove or get rid of something, often in a permanent or decisive manner.

  • For instance, “We need to do away with this outdated system and implement a new one.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s do away with these unnecessary rules.”
  • In a discussion about bad habits, someone might suggest, “It’s time to do away with smoking.”

23. Exterminate

This word is often used to refer to getting rid of pests or unwanted creatures, but it can also be used metaphorically to mean getting rid of something undesirable.

  • For example, “We need to exterminate these cockroaches from our kitchen.”
  • A person might say, “I want to exterminate all traces of this toxic relationship.”
  • In a discussion about a problem, someone might suggest, “We need to exterminate the root cause.”

24. Offload

To get rid of or dispose of something, often by transferring it to someone else or getting rid of a burden.

  • For instance, “I need to offload some of these old clothes.”
  • A person might say, “I’m offloading my responsibilities onto someone else.”
  • In a discussion about selling unwanted items, someone might suggest, “I’m going to offload these old electronics.”

25. Abandon

To leave or desert something or someone, often without intention of returning or taking responsibility.

  • For example, “The owner abandoned the property and left it in disrepair.”
  • A person might say, “I had to abandon my plans due to unforeseen circumstances.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “I had to abandon that toxic friendship.”

26. Cast aside

This phrase is often used to describe getting rid of something or someone that is no longer wanted or needed.

  • For example, “She cast aside her old clothes and bought a whole new wardrobe.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “We need to cast aside outdated policies and embrace change.”
  • A person might use this phrase in a personal relationship, saying, “I had to cast aside toxic friendships to prioritize my mental health.”

27. Discard

This word is commonly used to describe the act of getting rid of something that is no longer useful or wanted.

  • For instance, “Please discard any expired food from the refrigerator.”
  • In a cleaning context, someone might say, “I need to discard all the old magazines cluttering up my living room.”
  • A person might use this word when decluttering their belongings, saying, “I’m going to discard these old clothes I never wear.”

28. Eradicate

This term is often used to describe the complete removal or elimination of something, typically something unwanted or harmful.

  • For example, “Efforts are being made to eradicate poverty in the community.”
  • In a medical context, someone might say, “The goal is to eradicate the disease and prevent its spread.”
  • A person might use this word when discussing pest control, saying, “We need to eradicate the cockroach infestation in our home.”

29. Liquidate

This word is commonly used to describe the process of getting rid of assets or goods, typically by selling them off.

  • For instance, “The company had to liquidate its inventory to pay off its debts.”
  • In a financial context, someone might say, “We need to liquidate our investments to cover the unexpected expenses.”
  • A person might use this word when downsizing their belongings, saying, “I’m going to liquidate some of my furniture before moving to a smaller apartment.”

30. Rid oneself of

This phrase is often used to describe the act of getting rid of something that is unwanted or burdensome.

  • For example, “He decided to rid himself of all negative influences in his life.”
  • In a personal development context, someone might say, “I’m on a journey to rid myself of self-doubt and insecurities.”
  • A person might use this phrase when discussing breaking a bad habit, saying, “I’m determined to rid myself of this addiction.”

31. Expel

To forcefully remove or eject someone or something from a place or situation. “Kick out” is a colloquial term often used to describe the act of expelling.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “If you continue to disrupt the class, I will have to kick you out.”
  • In a discussion about immigration policies, someone might argue, “We need to tighten our borders and kick out illegal immigrants.”
  • A landlord might inform a tenant, “If you don’t pay rent on time, I have the right to kick you out.”

32. Junk

To dispose of or discard something, especially something considered useless or of poor quality. “Get rid of” is a common phrase used to express the act of removing unwanted items.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to clean out my closet and get rid of all the junk.”
  • In a conversation about decluttering, a person might advise, “If you haven’t used something in a year, it’s time to get rid of it.”
  • A homeowner might complain, “I need to hire a junk removal service to get rid of all the old furniture in my basement.”

33. Remove

To take something away from its current location or position. “Take away” is a simple phrase commonly used to describe the action of removing something.

  • For example, a parent might tell a child, “Please remove your shoes before entering the house.”
  • In a discussion about cleaning, someone might say, “I need to remove the stains from the carpet.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you help me remove this heavy furniture from the room?”

34. Sweep away

To thoroughly remove or eliminate something, often in a swift or efficient manner. “Clear out” is a phrase used to convey the idea of completely getting rid of something.

  • For instance, a manager might say, “Let’s sweep away all the outdated policies and start fresh.”
  • In a conversation about organizing, someone might suggest, “Clear out all the unnecessary items to make room for what’s important.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I can’t wait to clear out all the clutter in my garage and have a clean space.”

35. Abolish

To officially put an end to something, especially a system, practice, or institution. “Do away with” is a phrase often used to express the act of abolishing or eliminating something.

  • For example, a government might decide to abolish a law that is no longer relevant.
  • In a discussion about social justice, someone might argue, “We need to do away with systemic racism.”
  • A person might state, “It’s time to do away with gender inequality and create a more inclusive society.”

36. Cleanse

To remove or eliminate something unwanted or impure. “Cleanse” is often used in a metaphorical sense to describe the process of getting rid of negative or harmful elements.

  • For example, “I’m going to cleanse my wardrobe and get rid of all the clothes I never wear.”
  • In a discussion about healthy eating, someone might say, “I’m doing a cleanse to eliminate toxins from my body.”
  • Another might use the term in a spiritual context, saying, “I’m cleansing my mind of negative thoughts and focusing on positivity.”

37. Detach

To disconnect or disengage from something. “Detach” is often used to describe the act of removing oneself emotionally or physically from a situation or person.

  • For instance, in a relationship discussion, someone might say, “I had to detach myself from a toxic partner.”
  • In a work context, a person might say, “I need to detach from my phone and focus on my tasks.”
  • Another might use the term in a psychological context, saying, “Learning to detach from negative thoughts is an important skill in managing anxiety.”

38. Evict

To force someone to leave a place, usually by legal means. “Evict” is commonly used to describe the act of removing someone from their home or property.

  • For example, “The landlord evicted the tenant for not paying rent.”
  • In a discussion about wildlife conservation, someone might say, “We need to evict invasive species to protect the native ecosystem.”
  • Another might use the term in a metaphorical sense, saying, “I had to evict negative thoughts from my mind to find peace.”

39. Liquidize

To convert something into a liquid form or state. “Liquidize” is often used to describe the process of turning solid or semi-solid substances into a liquid.

  • For instance, in a cooking context, someone might say, “I’m going to liquidize the ingredients to make a smoothie.”
  • In a discussion about financial investments, a person might say, “I need to liquidize some assets to cover my expenses.”
  • Another might use the term in a scientific context, saying, “The heat caused the ice to liquidize and form a puddle.”

40. Root out

To search for and remove something or someone completely. “Root out” is often used to describe the act of getting rid of something or someone by finding and eliminating the source or cause.

  • For example, “The government is determined to root out corruption within its ranks.”
  • In a discussion about pest control, someone might say, “We need to root out the infestation to protect our crops.”
  • Another might use the term in a metaphorical sense, saying, “I’m trying to root out negative influences from my life to improve my mental well-being.”

41. Strip

To strip something means to remove or take off its outer layer or covering. It can also refer to removing something completely or getting rid of it.

  • For example, “He stripped the old wallpaper from the walls.”
  • In a discussion about decluttering, someone might say, “I need to strip down my wardrobe and get rid of clothes I don’t wear.”
  • A person might exclaim, “Strip that paint off the furniture and give it a fresh look!”

42. Throw away

To throw away something means to get rid of it by discarding or disposing of it. It implies that the item is no longer wanted or needed.

  • For instance, “I need to throw away these old magazines.”
  • In a conversation about cleaning, someone might say, “Let’s throw away all the expired food in the fridge.”
  • A person might advise, “If you don’t need it anymore, just throw it away.”

43. Annihilate

To annihilate something means to destroy it completely or utterly. It is a more intense and dramatic way of expressing the act of getting rid of something.

  • For example, “The tornado annihilated the entire town.”
  • In a discussion about pests, someone might say, “I need to annihilate these ants that keep invading my kitchen.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I’ll annihilate any obstacles that stand in my way!”

44. Clear

To clear something means to remove or eliminate it, often to create a clean or empty space. It can also refer to getting rid of obstacles or resolving a situation.

  • For instance, “Please clear the table after dinner.”
  • In a conversation about organizing, someone might say, “I need to clear out my closet and donate clothes I no longer wear.”
  • A person might advise, “To clear your mind, take a walk in nature.”

45. Exorcise

To exorcise something means to banish or remove it, often with the implication of getting rid of something evil or negative. It can also be used metaphorically to describe removing a negative influence or feeling.

  • For example, “The priest performed an exorcism to exorcise the demon.”
  • In a discussion about overcoming fears, someone might say, “I need to exorcise my fear of public speaking.”
  • A person might declare, “I will exorcise the toxic people from my life.”

46. Obliterate

To obliterate something means to completely destroy or eliminate it. This term is often used to emphasize the thoroughness of the destruction.

  • For example, “The bomb obliterated the entire building, leaving nothing but rubble.”
  • In a video game, a player might say, “I obliterated my opponents in that last round.”
  • A person discussing a failed project might say, “We need to start over and obliterate our previous approach.”

47. Shred

To shred something means to tear or cut it into small pieces. This term is often used metaphorically to describe getting rid of something quickly or completely.

  • For instance, “I shredded all the old documents to protect sensitive information.”
  • A person cleaning out their closet might say, “I’m going to shred all these old clothes I never wear.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “The scandal could shred the candidate’s chances of winning the election.”

48. Exile

To exile someone means to banish them or force them to leave a place. This term is often used to describe getting rid of someone by sending them away.

  • For example, “The king exiled his political rival to a remote island.”
  • In a fictional story, a character might say, “I was exiled from my homeland and forced to wander the wilderness.”
  • A person discussing their past might say, “I exiled myself from that toxic relationship and never looked back.”
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