Top 26 Slang For Glimpse – Meaning & Usage

Ever caught a quick glimpse of a new slang term and wondered what it meant? Look no further! We’ve gathered the latest and most popular slang for “glimpse” to keep you in the know. Stay ahead of the curve and impress your friends with your newfound linguistic skills by diving into our curated list!

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1. Peek

To take a quick look or glance at something or someone. It implies a brief and often discreet observation.

  • For example, “I couldn’t resist taking a peek at the presents before Christmas morning.”
  • A person might say, “Let me just take a quick peek at my phone to check the time.”
  • In a conversation about spying, someone might mention, “A spy needs to be able to take a peek without being detected.”

2. Glance

To cast a quick or casual look at something or someone. It suggests a brief and often cursory observation.

  • For instance, “She glanced at her watch to see how much time was left.”
  • In a crowded room, someone might say, “I took a quick glance around to see if I recognized anyone.”
  • A person might mention, “I caught a glance of my reflection in the mirror as I walked by.”

3. Gander

To take a casual or brief look at something or someone. It implies a relaxed and often nonchalant observation.

  • For example, “I took a gander at the menu to see what options were available.”
  • In a discussion about window shopping, someone might say, “I like to take a gander at the latest fashion trends.”
  • A person might mention, “I took a gander at the newspaper headlines while waiting in line.”

4. Squiz

To take a quick and often curious or scrutinizing look at something or someone. It suggests a brief and usually intense observation.

  • For instance, “I took a squiz at the map to figure out where we were.”
  • In a conversation about checking someone out, a person might say, “I couldn’t help but take a squiz at that attractive person.”
  • A curious individual might mention, “I took a squiz at the document to see if there were any interesting details.”

5. Eyeball

To gaze intently at something or someone. It implies a prolonged and focused observation.

  • For example, “She eyeballed the painting, trying to decipher its meaning.”
  • In a discussion about sizing up a situation, someone might say, “I eyeballed the room to see if there were any potential risks.”
  • A person might mention, “I couldn’t help but eyeball the delicious food on the buffet table.”

6. Quickie

A quick and brief look or glance at something or someone. “Quickie” is often used to describe a brief moment of observation or inspection.

  • For example, “I just took a quickie at the new restaurant menu.”
  • A person might say, “I didn’t get a good look, just a quickie of the suspect.”
  • Another might mention, “I need to take a quickie at the schedule before making plans.”

7. Scan

To quickly look over or examine something. “Scan” typically refers to a quick and cursory examination of text or images.

  • For instance, “I need to scan this document for any errors.”
  • A person might say, “I scanned the room for familiar faces.”
  • Another might mention, “I like to scan through articles to get a general idea before diving deeper.”

8. Spot

To briefly see or notice something or someone. “Spot” is often used to describe the act of catching a quick glimpse or sight.

  • For example, “I spotted a rare bird in the tree.”
  • A person might say, “I spotted her from across the room and couldn’t look away.”
  • Another might mention, “I always spot interesting graffiti while walking in the city.”

9. View

To observe or look at something. “View” is a more formal term used to describe the act of taking a deliberate and intentional look.

  • For instance, “I want to take a view of the sunset from the rooftop.”
  • A person might say, “I love to view artwork in museums.”
  • Another might mention, “I need to view the evidence before making a decision.”

10. Scope

To examine or inspect something. “Scope” is a slang term often used to describe the act of checking out or looking at something in detail.

  • For example, “I need to scope out the competition before the game.”
  • A person might say, “I scoped the new shopping mall for potential stores.”
  • Another might mention, “I like to scope the menu before deciding what to order.”

11. Check out

This phrase is often used to suggest taking a quick look or observing something of interest.

  • For example, “Check out that new car, it’s really cool!”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to check out that new restaurant everyone’s talking about.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “You should check out the latest trends for this season.”

12. Catch sight of

This phrase is used to describe the act of seeing or noticing something, often unexpectedly or briefly.

  • For instance, “I caught sight of a rare bird in my backyard this morning.”
  • A person might say, “I caught sight of my favorite actor at the grocery store.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might say, “When I turned the corner, I caught sight of the most beautiful view.”

13. Lay eyes on

This phrase is used to describe the act of seeing or looking at something, often for the first time or after a long time.

  • For example, “When I laid eyes on her, I knew she was the one.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t wait to lay my eyes on the new exhibit at the art museum.”
  • In a conversation about a long-lost friend, someone might say, “It’s been years since I laid eyes on him.”

14. Take a look-see

This phrase is a playful way of suggesting taking a quick look or glance at something.

  • For instance, “Take a look-see at this funny video I found.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s take a look-see at the menu before we decide.”
  • In a conversation about a new gadget, someone might say, “I’m going to take a look-see at the reviews before buying it.”

15. Cast an eye

This phrase is used to describe the act of looking at or glancing at something.

  • For example, “She cast an eye at the clock and realized she was running late.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll cast an eye at the document and see if there are any errors.”
  • In a conversation about interior design, someone might say, “I need to cast an eye at different paint colors for the living room.”

16. Behold

This word is used to express a strong and intense observation or to draw attention to something remarkable.

  • For example, “Behold the beauty of the sunset.”
  • In a fantasy novel, a character might say, “Behold, the ancient artifact of power.”
  • A tour guide might exclaim, “Behold the grandeur of the Taj Mahal.”

17. Peep

This word is used to describe a brief and often secretive observation or glance.

  • For instance, “I took a peep through the keyhole to see what was happening.”
  • In a conversation about celebrity gossip, someone might say, “I peeped at the latest news about the famous couple.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can I peep at your notes for the upcoming exam?”

18. Look-see

This word is used to describe a casual and informal observation or examination.

  • For example, “Let me have a look-see at that new gadget you got.”
  • In a discussion about a new car, someone might say, “I had a look-see at the latest model in the showroom.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Can I have a look-see at your artwork?”

19. Glint

This word is used to describe a momentary and shiny glimpse.

  • For instance, “The sunlight made the water glint in the distance.”
  • In a story about a treasure hunt, a character might notice, “I saw a glint of gold hidden among the rocks.”
  • A photographer might say, “I captured the glint in the model’s eyes.”

20. Gawk

This word is used to describe an intense and often impolite observation.

  • For example, “The tourists gawked at the famous landmark.”
  • In a conversation about strange behavior, someone might say, “I saw a person gawking at a street performer for hours.”
  • A friend might tease, “Stop gawking at that attractive stranger!”

21. Glom

To quickly glance or take a brief look at something or someone. “Glom” is often used to describe a casual or nonchalant observation.

  • For example, “I just glommed at the new menu, and it looks delicious.”
  • A person might say, “I glommed at her from across the room and couldn’t help but be captivated.”
  • Another might ask, “Can I glom at your notes? I missed that part of the lecture.”

22. Glimpse

To catch a quick or fleeting view of something or someone. “Glimpse” implies seeing something for a short moment or from a distance.

  • For instance, “I caught a glimpse of the sunset before it disappeared behind the mountains.”
  • A person might say, “I glimpsed him in the crowd, but he disappeared before I could reach him.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I finally glimpsed the rare bird I’ve been searching for!”

23. Scoop

To obtain a quick look or gather information about something or someone. “Scoop” is often used to describe getting the inside or exclusive details.

  • For example, “I just got the scoop on the upcoming concert – it’s going to be amazing!”
  • A person might say, “I need to scoop out the competition before the big game.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you have any scoops on the new restaurant that just opened?”

24. Deek

To take a quick or furtive look at something or someone. “Deek” is often used to describe a secretive or sly observation.

  • For instance, “I deeked at her diary when she wasn’t looking.”
  • A person might say, “I deeked at the answer key to make sure I got the right answers.”
  • Another might admit, “I deeked at his phone to see who he was texting.”

25. Squint

To look at something or someone with narrowed eyes, often due to poor visibility or trying to see something clearly. “Squint” can also refer to a quick or skeptical look.

  • For example, “I had to squint to read the small print on the sign.”
  • A person might say, “I squinted at the distant figure, trying to make out who it was.”
  • Another might comment, “She gave me a squint when I told her my excuse for being late.”

26. Check

This slang term is used to describe a quick look or glance at something. It refers to taking a brief moment to observe or assess a situation or object.

  • For example, “Let me take a check at the menu before deciding what to order.”
  • In a conversation about a new fashion trend, someone might say, “I need to check out the latest styles.”
  • A person discussing a potential purchase might ask, “Can I have a check at the price tag?”
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