Top 20 Slang For Go To Sleep – Meaning & Usage

If you’ve ever found yourself tossing and turning at night, searching for that elusive state of rest, look no further. We’ve compiled a list of the most creative and fun slang terms for “go to sleep” that will have you drifting off in no time. Say goodbye to counting sheep and hello to a whole new world of slumber-inducing phrases. So cozy up, relax, and get ready to catch some Z’s with our latest listicle!

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1. Hit the hay

This phrase means to go to sleep or to go to bed. It is often used to indicate that someone is tired and ready to sleep.

  • For example, “I had a long day at work, so I’m going to hit the hay early tonight.”
  • In a conversation about sleep habits, someone might say, “I usually hit the hay around 10 PM.”
  • Another person might comment, “I can’t wait to hit the hay after this busy week.”

2. Catch some Z’s

This slang phrase means to get some sleep. The “Z’s” refer to the sound of snoring, indicating that someone is in a deep sleep.

  • For instance, “I need to catch some Z’s before my big presentation tomorrow.”
  • A person might say, “I didn’t sleep well last night, so I’m looking forward to catching some Z’s tonight.”
  • Another person might jokingly comment, “I’ll be catching some Z’s during that boring meeting.”

3. Hit the sack

This expression means to go to sleep or to go to bed. The “sack” refers to a bed or a sleeping bag.

  • For example, “I have an early morning tomorrow, so I better hit the sack.”
  • In a conversation about sleep routines, someone might say, “I usually hit the sack around 11 PM.”
  • Another person might comment, “I’m exhausted, I can’t wait to hit the sack tonight.”

4. Catch some shut-eye

This phrase means to get some sleep, often implying a short period of rest or a quick nap.

  • For instance, “I only have 30 minutes, but I’ll try to catch some shut-eye before my next meeting.”
  • A person might say, “I didn’t get much sleep last night, so I need to catch some shut-eye tonight.”
  • Another person might comment, “I always feel refreshed after catching some shut-eye during the day.”

5. Snooze

This slang term refers to taking a short nap or getting some sleep, especially during the day.

  • For example, “I’m feeling tired, I think I’ll take a quick snooze.”
  • In a conversation about productivity, someone might say, “Taking a short snooze can help improve focus and energy.”
  • Another person might comment, “I love taking a snooze on lazy Sunday afternoons.”

6. Crash out

This slang term refers to falling asleep quickly and deeply, often due to exhaustion or a long day. It implies a sudden and complete loss of consciousness.

  • For example, after a long day at work, someone might say, “I’m so tired, I’m going to crash out as soon as I get home.”
  • If a friend is struggling to stay awake, you might suggest, “Why don’t you crash out on the couch for a bit?”
  • When describing a deep sleep, someone might say, “I crashed out and didn’t wake up until morning.”

7. Rack out

This slang term is often used in a military or prison setting to mean going to sleep. It can also be used more generally to mean going to bed.

  • For instance, a soldier might say, “Lights out, time to rack out.”
  • In a prison movie, a character might say, “I’m exhausted, I need to rack out.”
  • When discussing sleep patterns, someone might say, “I try to rack out at the same time every night to maintain a consistent sleep schedule.”

8. Sawing logs

This slang term refers to snoring heavily while sleeping. It compares the sound of snoring to the noise made by sawing logs.

  • For example, if someone is snoring loudly, you might say, “Listen to him sawing logs.”
  • When describing someone’s snoring habits, you might say, “My grandpa snores so loudly, it sounds like he’s sawing logs.”
  • If a friend complains about their partner’s snoring, you might jokingly suggest, “Maybe you should get some earplugs for when they’re sawing logs.”

9. Tuck in

This slang term means to get into bed and prepare to sleep. It implies a sense of comfort and coziness.

  • For instance, before going to bed, someone might say, “I’m going to tuck in for the night.”
  • If a parent is putting their child to bed, they might say, “Time to tuck you in, sweetheart.”
  • When discussing nighttime routines, someone might say, “I always make sure to tuck myself in with a good book before falling asleep.”

10. Bed down

This slang term means to settle in for sleep, especially in a temporary or unfamiliar location. It often implies making oneself comfortable and preparing for a good night’s rest.

  • For example, if someone is camping, they might say, “It’s time to bed down for the night.”
  • When staying at a friend’s house, you might ask, “Where can I bed down for the night?”
  • If someone is preparing to sleep in an unfamiliar hotel, they might say, “I’m going to bed down and get some rest before exploring the city tomorrow.”

11. Nod off

When someone “nod off,” it means they fall asleep for a short period of time, often unintentionally or without realizing it.

  • For example, “I was so tired during the meeting that I started to nod off.”
  • A person might say, “I always nod off when I watch movies late at night.”
  • Someone might comment, “I can’t help but nod off during long car rides.”

12. Slumber

To “slumber” means to sleep peacefully or deeply.

  • For instance, “After a long day, all I want to do is slumber.”
  • A person might say, “I love the feeling of slumbering under a cozy blanket.”
  • Someone might comment, “I can’t wait to slumber in my own bed after a week of traveling.”

13. Zonk out

When someone “zonk out,” it means they fall asleep quickly and deeply.

  • For example, “I was so exhausted that I zonked out as soon as my head hit the pillow.”
  • A person might say, “I always zonk out after a long day of work.”
  • Someone might comment, “I can’t help but zonk out when I’m on a long flight.”

14. Drift off

To “drift off” means to gradually fall asleep, often in a peaceful or relaxed manner.

  • For instance, “As I listened to the soothing music, I started to drift off.”
  • A person might say, “I love the feeling of drifting off to sleep on a lazy Sunday morning.”
  • Someone might comment, “I find it easier to drift off when I have a bedtime routine.”

15. Turn in

When someone “turn in,” it means they go to bed or prepare to sleep.

  • For example, “I’m feeling tired, so I think I’ll turn in early tonight.”
  • A person might say, “I always turn in at the same time every night to maintain a consistent sleep schedule.”
  • Someone might comment, “I can’t wait to turn in and snuggle under my warm blankets.”

16. Hit the pillow

This phrase means to go to sleep, often implying that someone is tired and ready to rest. It emphasizes the action of laying down on a pillow.

  • For example, after a long day at work, someone might say, “I can’t wait to hit the pillow and get some rest.”
  • In a conversation about sleep habits, a person might mention, “I always hit the pillow early because I need a full night’s sleep.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “It’s time to hit the pillow and get some sleep, sweetie.”

17. Call it a night

This phrase means to bring an end to the current activities and go to sleep. It implies that the day or evening has come to a close and it’s time to rest.

  • For instance, after a long night of partying, someone might say, “I think it’s time to call it a night and get some sleep.”
  • In a conversation about a late-night study session, a student might say, “I finally finished my work and decided to call it a night.”
  • A person might mention, “When I’m tired, I just call it a night and go to bed early.”

18. Go out like a light

This phrase means to fall asleep very quickly and easily, often without any difficulty or interruption. It suggests that someone is able to sleep deeply and soundly.

  • For example, after a long day of physical activity, someone might say, “I went out like a light as soon as my head hit the pillow.”
  • In a conversation about sleep quality, a person might say, “I envy those who can go out like a light and sleep through the night.”
  • A friend might comment, “I’m so tired today, I went out like a light last night and didn’t wake up until morning.”

19. Get some shuteye

This phrase means to go to sleep or rest, often implying that someone needs to recharge and get some rest. It emphasizes the action of closing one’s eyes and getting some sleep.

  • For instance, after a long day of work, someone might say, “I’m going to go home and get some shuteye before starting again tomorrow.”
  • In a conversation about sleep deprivation, a person might mention, “I really need to get some shuteye tonight to catch up on sleep.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “It’s time to get some shuteye and rest your body and mind.”

20. Go to dreamland

This phrase means to go to sleep and enter the state of dreaming. It suggests that someone is looking forward to a restful sleep and the possibility of having dreams.

  • For example, after a long day of activities, someone might say, “I’m so tired, I can’t wait to go to dreamland and have a good night’s sleep.”
  • In a conversation about the importance of sleep, a person might mention, “I love going to dreamland and experiencing vivid dreams.”
  • A friend might comment, “I had the most amazing dream last night after going to dreamland.”
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