Top 69 Slang For Going To The Bathroom – Meaning & Usage

Everyone does it, but not everyone talks about it. We’re here to break the taboo and explore the colorful world of slang for going to the bathroom. From hilarious euphemisms to clever phrases, we’ve gathered the most popular and creative ways people refer to this everyday necessity. Get ready to laugh, cringe, and maybe even learn a few new terms to add to your bathroom vocabulary. So, grab your reading material and prepare to dive into this flush-worthy listicle!

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1. Restroom

A commonly used term to refer to a public facility where one can relieve themselves or freshen up. The term “restroom” implies a place of relaxation and comfort while attending to bodily needs.

  • For example, when asking for directions, you might say, “Excuse me, where is the nearest restroom?”
  • In a restaurant, a waiter might say, “The restroom is located at the back of the establishment.”
  • A sign in a mall might indicate, “Restrooms are on the second floor.”

2. Latrine

A more informal term for a bathroom, typically used in military or outdoor settings. The term “latrine” often refers to a simple facility or hole in the ground used for waste disposal.

  • For instance, during camping trips, one might ask, “Where’s the latrine?”
  • In a military barracks, a soldier might be instructed, “Make sure to clean the latrine before inspection.”
  • A person discussing survival skills might mention, “Knowing how to construct a latrine is essential in wilderness settings.”

3. Water Closet

A formal and somewhat old-fashioned term for a toilet, commonly used in British English. The term “water closet” refers to a small, enclosed room or compartment with a toilet and a sink for personal hygiene.

  • For example, when visiting a friend’s house, you might ask, “May I use the water closet?”
  • In a historical novel, a character might say, “I’ll be in the water closet if anyone needs me.”
  • A British tour guide might point out, “The water closet is located on the left-hand side of the hallway.”

4. Comfort Station

A euphemistic term for a restroom, often used in formal or polite contexts. The term “comfort station” suggests a place where one can find relief and comfort while attending to personal needs.

  • For instance, in a fancy restaurant, a waiter might say, “Please follow me to the comfort station.”
  • In a hotel, a sign might direct guests, “Comfort stations are located on every floor.”
  • A person hosting a formal event might inform guests, “The comfort stations are easily accessible near the entrance.”

5. Washroom

A Canadian term for a restroom, commonly used in both formal and informal settings. The term “washroom” emphasizes the availability of facilities for washing or freshening up.

  • For example, when in Canada, you might ask, “Where is the nearest washroom?”
  • In a shopping mall, a sign might indicate, “Washrooms are located on each level.”
  • A person discussing travel tips might advise, “Always carry tissues in your bag when using public washrooms.”

6. The Men’s/Ladies’ Room

This term refers to the designated restroom for either men or women in a public place. It is commonly used to indicate the location of the bathroom facilities.

  • For example, a person might ask, “Excuse me, where is the men’s room?”
  • In a restaurant, a sign might indicate, “Restrooms: Men on the left, ladies on the right.”
  • A group of friends might discuss plans and say, “Let’s meet up in the ladies’ room after we finish eating.”

7. The Gents’/Ladies’ Room

This term is another way to refer to the men’s or women’s restroom. It is a more formal and polite way of indicating the bathroom area.

  • For instance, a sign might say, “Gents’ facilities are located on the ground floor.”
  • A person might ask, “Excuse me, where can I find the ladies’ room?”
  • In a hotel, a staff member might say, “The restrooms are on the second floor, near the elevators.”

8. WC (Water Closet)

This term is a common abbreviation used to refer to the toilet or bathroom. It originated from the British term “water closet” and is still widely used today.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need to use the WC, be right back.”
  • In a public place, a sign might indicate, “WC: Please keep clean and tidy.”
  • A friend might ask, “Is there a WC nearby? I really need to go.”

9. CR (Comfort Room)

This term is commonly used in Southeast Asia to refer to the restroom or bathroom. The term “comfort room” is used to indicate a place where one can find comfort and privacy while using the facilities.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Excuse me, where is the CR?”
  • In a shopping mall, a sign might indicate, “Restrooms: CR located on the second floor.”
  • A local might ask, “Is there a CR nearby? I need to freshen up.”

10. Lavatory

This term is a formal way to refer to the bathroom or restroom. It is often used in more formal settings or in professional environments.

  • For example, a person might ask, “Excuse me, where is the lavatory?”
  • In an office building, a sign might indicate, “Lavatories are located on every floor.”
  • A colleague might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the lavatory.”

11. The Bog

This term refers to the toilet or bathroom. It is a slang term commonly used in British English.

  • For example, “I need to use the bog, be right back.”
  • Someone might ask, “Where’s the bog in this place?”
  • A person might say, “Sorry, the bog is out of order.”

12. The Loo

This term is another way to refer to the bathroom, particularly in British English.

  • For instance, “I’ll be in the loo, just give me a minute.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you show me where the loo is?”
  • Someone might say, “I need to use the loo urgently.”

13. John

This term is a common slang term used to refer to the toilet.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the John.”
  • A person might ask, “Where’s the nearest John?”
  • Someone might say, “The John is occupied at the moment.”

14. Privy

This term refers to the bathroom or toilet, often used in a more formal or old-fashioned context.

  • For instance, “Excuse me, where’s the privy?”
  • A person might say, “I’ll be in the privy, just give me a moment.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you have a privy in your house?”

15. Outhouse

This term specifically refers to a small building or structure located outside of a main dwelling, used as a toilet.

  • For example, “I had to use the outhouse while camping.”
  • A person might ask, “Is there an outhouse nearby?”
  • Someone might say, “The outhouse is a bit rustic, but it gets the job done.”

16. The Head

This slang term refers to the toilet or bathroom. It is commonly used to indicate the need to use the bathroom.

  • For example, “Excuse me, I need to use the head.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, just going to the head.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you know where the nearest head is?”

17. Hit the head

This phrase means to go to the bathroom or use the toilet.

  • For instance, “I’ll be right back, just need to hit the head.”
  • In a military setting, someone might say, “Before we go, let’s all hit the head.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you wait for me? I need to hit the head really quick.”

18. Take a leak

This slang phrase means to urinate or pee.

  • For example, “Hold on, I need to take a leak.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I’ll be back, just going to take a leak.”
  • A person might ask, “Is there a restroom nearby? I really need to take a leak.”

19. Drop the kids off at the pool

This humorous phrase means to have a bowel movement or defecate.

  • For instance, “Excuse me, I need to go drop the kids off at the pool.”
  • In a playful manner, someone might say, “I’ll be back, just need to drop the kids off at the pool.”
  • A person might ask, “Is there a bathroom around? I really need to drop the kids off at the pool.”

20. Answer nature’s call

This phrase means to respond to the urge to use the bathroom.

  • For example, “Sorry, I have to answer nature’s call.”
  • In a formal setting, someone might say, “Please excuse me, I need to answer nature’s call.”
  • A person might ask, “Is there a restroom nearby? I need to answer nature’s call.”

21. Use the facilities

This phrase is a polite and formal way to refer to using the bathroom or restroom facilities. It can be used in both professional and casual settings.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Where can I use the facilities?”, they are asking where they can find a restroom.
  • In a workplace, a manager might remind employees, “Please remember to use the facilities during your break times.”
  • At a social event, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the facilities.”

22. Take a bathroom break

This phrase is commonly used in a professional or educational setting to indicate the need to temporarily leave a meeting, class, or activity in order to use the bathroom.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I need to take a bathroom break”, they are indicating their intention to leave momentarily.
  • During a long conference, a speaker might say, “We will have a short break for everyone to take a bathroom break.”
  • In a classroom, a student might ask the teacher, “Can I please take a bathroom break?”

23. Pay a visit to the porcelain throne

This humorous phrase refers to the act of using the toilet. It is often used in a lighthearted or joking manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “Excuse me, I need to pay a visit to the porcelain throne.”
  • In a casual conversation, a friend might ask, “Are you ready to pay a visit to the porcelain throne before we leave?”
  • In a funny text message, someone might say, “I’m off to pay my respects to the porcelain throne. Wish me luck!”

24. Take a pit stop

This phrase is commonly used to indicate the need to take a short break in order to use the restroom. It is often used in informal or casual settings.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I need to take a pit stop”, they are expressing their need for a quick bathroom break.
  • During a road trip, a driver might say, “Let’s take a pit stop at the next rest area so everyone can use the restroom.”
  • In a group outing, someone might suggest, “Before we continue, let’s take a pit stop and use the restroom.”

25. Take a bio break

This phrase is commonly used in professional or formal settings to indicate the need to take a short break in order to use the bathroom.

  • For example, during a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s take a quick bio break before we continue.”
  • In a training session, the instructor might announce, “We will have a 10-minute bio break for everyone to use the restroom.”
  • In a work email, someone might write, “I’ll be away from my desk for a few minutes, taking a bio break.”

26. Go number two

This phrase is a euphemism for the act of defecating or having a bowel movement. It is often used to refer to the act of going to the bathroom to defecate.

  • For example, “I’ll be back in a minute, I need to go number two.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Did you go number two before we leave?”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I can’t believe I have to go number two again, my stomach is acting up.”

27. Take a whiz

This phrase is a colloquial term for the act of urinating. It is often used to refer to the act of going to the bathroom to urinate.

  • For instance, “I’ll be right back, I need to take a whiz.”
  • In a public restroom, someone might say, “Excuse me, I just need to take a quick whiz.”
  • During a road trip, a person might ask, “Can we stop soon? I really need to take a whiz.”

28. Take a crap

This phrase is a colloquial term for the act of defecating or having a bowel movement. It is often used to refer to the act of going to the bathroom to defecate.

  • For example, “I’ll be in the bathroom, need to take a crap.”
  • A friend might joke, “Don’t go in there, I just took a crap.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I always feel better after taking a good crap.”

29. Take a potty break

This phrase is a euphemism for taking a break to use the restroom. It is often used in a casual or lighthearted manner.

  • For instance, “I’ll be back after I take a potty break.”
  • During a meeting, someone might say, “Can we pause for a moment? I need to take a quick potty break.”
  • In a family setting, a parent might say to their child, “Let’s take a potty break before we continue playing.”

30. Drain the lizard

This phrase is a slang term for the act of urinating. It is often used to refer to the act of going to the bathroom to urinate.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to drain the lizard.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ve had so much to drink, I need to find a bathroom and drain the lizard.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Do you mind if I go drain the lizard before we continue?”

31. Release the Kraken

This phrase humorously refers to the act of going to the bathroom. It is a playful and exaggerated way to express the need to use the restroom.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve had too much to drink, I need to release the Kraken.”
  • In a lighthearted conversation, a person might jokingly ask, “Are you about to release the Kraken?”
  • A friend might say to another, “Hold on, I need to find a bathroom and release the Kraken.”

32. Powder my nose

This phrase is a euphemism for going to the bathroom, especially for women who may need to touch up their makeup or appearance.

  • For instance, a woman might say, “I’ll be right back, I just need to powder my nose.”
  • In a social setting, someone might ask, “Excuse me, could you direct me to the nearest restroom? I need to powder my nose.”
  • A person might use this phrase humorously and say, “I’ll be back in a minute, I just need to powder my nose and fix my hair.”

33. Go for a tinkle

This phrase is a playful and informal way to express the need to urinate. It is often used in a lighthearted or humorous context.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to go for a tinkle.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might ask, “Can you hold on for a moment? I really need to go for a tinkle.”
  • A friend might use this phrase jokingly and say, “I’ve had too much water, I need to go for a tinkle.”

34. Go for a poop

This phrase is a colloquial way to express the need to defecate. It is a straightforward and informal term used in casual conversations.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll catch up with you later, I need to go for a poop.”
  • In a relaxed setting, a person might ask, “Do you mind if I excuse myself? I need to go for a poop.”
  • A friend might use this phrase humorously and say, “Hold on, I need to find a bathroom and go for a poop.”

35. Visit the porcelain throne

This phrase humorously refers to the act of using the toilet. It emphasizes the idea of a toilet as a royal seat or throne made of porcelain.

  • For example, someone might say, “Excuse me, I need to visit the porcelain throne.”
  • In a light-hearted conversation, a person might ask, “Have you paid a visit to the porcelain throne yet?”
  • A friend might use this phrase jokingly and say, “I’ll be back, I need to take my rightful place on the porcelain throne.”

36. Go to the loo

This phrase is commonly used in British English to refer to going to the bathroom or using the toilet.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to go to the loo.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Before we leave, make sure you go to the loo.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Do you know where the loo is?”

37. Go for a wee

This phrase is a colloquial way of saying “go to the bathroom” specifically to urinate.

  • For instance, “I’ll be back in a minute, I need to go for a wee.”
  • In a more polite setting, someone might say, “Excuse me, I need to go for a quick wee.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you need to go for a wee before we go?”

38. Go for a number two

This phrase is a euphemism for going to the bathroom specifically to have a bowel movement.

  • For example, “I’ll be a while, I need to go for a number two.”
  • In a more casual conversation, someone might say, “I’ll catch up with you later, I need to go for a quick number two.”
  • A person might ask, “Is there a bathroom nearby? I need to go for a number two.”

39. Pay a visit to the little boys’/girls’ room

This phrase is a playful way of referring to going to the bathroom, specifically to use the restroom designated for children.

  • For instance, a teacher might say to a student, “If you need to go, you can pay a visit to the little boys’ room.”
  • In a family setting, a parent might ask their child, “Do you need to pay a visit to the little girls’ room before we leave?”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “I’ll meet you outside, I need to pay a visit to the little boys’ room.”

40. Go for a potty break

This phrase is a lighthearted way of saying “go to the bathroom” or “take a bathroom break”. It is often used in informal or casual settings.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to go for a potty break.”
  • In a workplace setting, someone might say, “I’ll be back in a few minutes, I need to go for a quick potty break.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Do you need to go for a potty break before we leave?”

41. Hit the john

This phrase is a casual way of saying “go to the bathroom” or “use the toilet”. It often implies a quick visit to relieve oneself.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to hit the john.”
  • In a conversation about needing a bathroom break, someone might say, “I can’t wait any longer, I have to hit the john.”
  • A person might jokingly ask, “Mind if I hit the john before we leave?”

42. Take a restroom break

This phrase means to take a break from whatever one is doing and go to the restroom. It is a more formal way of expressing the need to use the bathroom.

  • For instance, “I’ll be back in a moment, I need to take a restroom break.”
  • In a work setting, someone might say, “I’ll be stepping out for a minute to take a restroom break.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you mind if I take a restroom break before we continue?”

43. Take a comfort break

This phrase suggests taking a break from an activity to attend to personal comfort, specifically referring to using the bathroom.

  • For example, “I’m going to take a comfort break, I’ll be back in a few minutes.”
  • In a meeting or conference, someone might announce, “We’ll have a short comfort break in 10 minutes.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll join you for lunch after I take a comfort break.”

44. Take a lavatory break

This phrase is a more formal way of saying “go to the bathroom” or “use the toilet”. It is often used in professional or formal settings.

  • For instance, “Excuse me, I need to take a lavatory break.”
  • In a discussion about restroom availability, someone might say, “Is there a nearby lavatory I can use?”
  • A person might ask, “Do you mind if I take a lavatory break before we continue?”

45. Take a pee

This phrase is a colloquial way of saying “go to the bathroom” specifically to urinate. It is often used in informal or casual conversations.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to take a pee.”
  • In a discussion about bathroom breaks, someone might say, “I’ll just take a quick pee and be back.”
  • A person might jokingly ask, “Mind if I take a pee break before we continue?”

46. Take a poop

To defecate; to have a bowel movement. This phrase is a euphemism for going to the bathroom to relieve oneself.

  • For example, “Excuse me, I need to take a poop.”
  • A parent might say to a child, “Make sure you take a poop before we leave.”
  • A friend might jokingly ask, “Are you going to take a poop or take forever?”

47. Take a wizz

To urinate; to pee. This phrase is a colloquial expression for going to the bathroom to relieve oneself.

  • For instance, “Hold on, I need to take a wizz.”
  • A person might say, “I always have to take a wizz first thing in the morning.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Do you need to take a wizz before we go?”

48. Take a number one

To urinate; to pee. This phrase is a euphemism for going to the bathroom to relieve oneself.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to take a number one.”
  • A person might say, “I always have to take a number one before a long car ride.”
  • In a public restroom, one might ask, “Is there a place to take a number one around here?”

49. Go drain the lizard

To urinate; to pee. This phrase is a humorous way of referring to going to the bathroom to relieve oneself.

  • For instance, “I’ll be back in a minute, I need to go drain the lizard.”
  • A friend might say, “Hold on, I have to go drain the lizard before we leave.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Do you need to go drain the lizard before we continue?”

50. Go powder your nose

To use the bathroom, typically referring to women going to the restroom to freshen up or use the toilet.

  • For example, “Excuse me, I need to go powder my nose.”
  • A woman might say, “I’ll be right back, I just need to go powder my nose.”
  • In a social setting, someone might ask, “Would you like to go powder your nose before we continue?”

51. Go for a slash

This phrase is commonly used in British slang to refer to the act of urinating. It is often used in casual or informal settings.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to go for a slash.”
  • In a group of friends, someone might ask, “Anyone need to go for a slash before we leave?”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been holding it in all day, I really need to go for a slash.”

52. Do the business

This phrase is a euphemism for going to the bathroom, specifically to use the toilet. It is often used in a lighthearted or humorous manner.

  • For instance, “Excuse me, I need to do the business.”
  • In a conversation about bathroom etiquette, someone might say, “Always remember to do the business before leaving the house.”
  • A person might jokingly say, “I’ll be in the bathroom, doing the business. Don’t disturb me.”

53. Go for a number one

This phrase is a euphemism for urinating, specifically referring to the act of urinating without defecating. It is commonly used in informal or casual settings.

  • For example, “I’ll be back, just going for a number one.”
  • In a public restroom, someone might say, “I’ll use the stall for a number two, you can go for a number one.”
  • A person might ask, “Is there a bathroom nearby? I really need to go for a number one.”

54. Go for a dump

This phrase is a colloquial expression for the act of defecating. It is often used in a casual or humorous manner.

  • For instance, “I need to go for a dump, be right back.”
  • In a conversation about digestive health, someone might say, “Eating more fiber can help regulate your bowel movements and make it easier to go for a dump.”
  • A person might jokingly say, “I’ll be in the bathroom, going for a dump. Wish me luck.”

55. Go for a pee

This phrase is a casual and common way to refer to the act of urinating. It is often used in informal settings.

  • For example, “I’ll be back, just going for a pee.”
  • In a public place, someone might ask, “Where can I go for a pee around here?”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been holding it in for so long, I really need to go for a pee.”

56. Go for a piddle

This phrase is commonly used in British English to describe the act of urinating. It is a casual and lighthearted way to refer to going to the bathroom.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I just need to go for a piddle.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you need to go for a piddle before we leave?”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Remember to go for a piddle before we get in the car.”

57. Go for a bowel movement

This phrase is a more formal way to describe the act of having a bowel movement. It refers to the process of expelling solid waste from the body.

  • For instance, “I have to go for a bowel movement, I’ll be back in a few minutes.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you need to go for a bowel movement before we leave?”
  • A doctor might inquire, “Have you been having regular bowel movements?”

58. Go for a wee-wee

This phrase is a playful and childlike way to describe the act of urinating. It is often used when talking to or about young children.

  • For example, “Does anyone need to go for a wee-wee before we leave?”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Did you go for a wee-wee before bed?”
  • A caregiver might say, “Let’s make sure you go for a wee-wee before we go outside to play.”

59. Go for a BM

This phrase is a shortened and more casual way to refer to the act of having a bowel movement. “BM” stands for bowel movement.

  • For instance, “I’ll be right back, I need to go for a BM.”
  • Someone might ask, “Did you go for a BM yet?”
  • A person might say to their friend, “I’ll meet you outside, I just need to go for a quick BM.”

60. Go to the powder room

This phrase is a euphemism for going to the bathroom, particularly for women. It is a more polite and formal way to refer to the act of using the restroom.

  • For example, “Excuse me, I need to go to the powder room.”
  • Someone might ask, “Where can I find the powder room?”
  • A host might say, “Feel free to use the powder room if you need to freshen up.”

61. Drop a deuce

This slang phrase means to defecate or have a bowel movement. It is a more casual and humorous way to refer to using the bathroom.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to drop a deuce.”
  • In a lighthearted conversation about bodily functions, a person might joke, “I dropped a deuce earlier and it was epic.”
  • A friend might ask, “Did you drop a deuce before we leave? We don’t want any emergencies on the road.”

62. Go to the little boys’/girls’ room

This slang phrase is often used by adults to humorously refer to using the bathroom. It is a playful and nostalgic way to talk about going to the restroom.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Excuse me, I need to go to the little boys’ room.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Do you mind if I go to the little girls’ room real quick?”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Remember, if you need to go, just say you need to go to the little boys’ room.”

63. Drop the kids in the pool

This slang phrase means to defecate or have a bowel movement. It is a humorous and slightly crude way to refer to using the bathroom.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll be back, I have to drop the kids in the pool.”
  • In a lighthearted conversation about bodily functions, a person might joke, “I dropped the kids in the pool earlier and it was a relief.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you okay? You look like you need to drop the kids in the pool.”

64. Go to the lavatory

This slang phrase is a more formal and polite way to refer to using the bathroom. It is often used in professional or formal settings.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Excuse me, I need to go to the lavatory.”
  • In a conversation about restroom availability, a person might ask, “Where is the nearest lavatory?”
  • A flight attendant might announce, “Ladies and gentlemen, the lavatories are located at the front and rear of the plane.”

65. Drop a bomb

This slang phrase means to defecate or have a bowel movement. It is a more exaggerated and humorous way to talk about going to the bathroom.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to go drop a bomb, be right back.”
  • In a playful conversation about bodily functions, a person might joke, “Watch out, I’m about to drop a bomb in there.”
  • A friend might ask, “Did you drop a bomb before we left? We don’t want any surprises later.”

66. Go to the restroom

This is a common phrase used to indicate the act of going to the bathroom, specifically to use the facilities.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to go to the restroom.”
  • In a public setting, someone might ask, “Where is the nearest restroom?”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Before we leave, make sure you go to the restroom.”

67. Take a leaky break

This phrase humorously refers to the act of taking a break to urinate.

  • For instance, “I’m going to take a leaky break, I’ll be back in a few.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I need to take a leaky break, be right back.”
  • A friend might jokingly ask, “Are you going on a leaky break again?”

68. Go to the can

This slang phrase is used to indicate the act of going to the bathroom, specifically to use the toilet.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to go to the can.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I’m going to the can, be right back.”
  • A person might ask, “Where’s the nearest can?”

69. Take a nature break

This phrase refers to the act of taking a break to answer the natural urge to use the bathroom.

  • For instance, “I need to take a nature break, be right back.”
  • In a hiking or camping context, someone might say, “Let’s take a nature break before continuing.”
  • A person might jokingly ask, “Are you taking a nature break again?”
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