Top 80 Slang For Greeks – Meaning & Usage

Greece, a country steeped in rich history and vibrant culture, is also home to a lively slang that reflects the spirit of its people. From expressions that capture the warmth of Greek hospitality to phrases that embody the zest for life, we’ve compiled a list of the top slang words and phrases used by Greeks. Whether you’re planning a visit to Greece or simply want to expand your linguistic repertoire, this listicle is sure to enlighten and entertain. Opa!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Στην υγειά μας! (STIN-eh YAH-mas)

This phrase is used as a toast to wish good health to everyone present. It is commonly said before taking a sip of alcohol or during celebrations.

  • For example, at a Greek wedding, someone might raise their glass and say, “Στην υγειά μας!”
  • During a festive dinner, a person might propose a toast by saying, “Let’s all raise our glasses and say ‘Στην υγειά μας!'”
  • When celebrating a special occasion, someone might exclaim, “Στην υγειά μας! May we have many more happy moments like this!”

2. Ασπρο πάτο (AHS-pro PAH-toh)

This slang phrase is used to describe a situation where someone is left with no money or is financially struggling.

  • For instance, if someone has spent all their money and can’t afford to pay for something, they might say, “Έχω ασπρο πάτο.”
  • When talking about financial difficulties, a person might say, “Οι οικονομικές μου συνθήκες είναι ασπρο πάτο.”
  • If someone is unable to go on a vacation due to lack of funds, they might say, “Δεν μπορώ να πάω, έχω ασπρο πάτο.”

3. Πόσο κάνει αυτό (POH-soh KAH-nee af-TOH)?

This phrase is commonly used when asking about the price of something.

  • For example, when shopping for clothes, someone might ask the salesperson, “Πόσο κάνει αυτό το πουκάμισο;”
  • If someone is interested in buying a new phone, they might inquire, “Πόσο κάνει αυτό το κινητό;”
  • When at a restaurant, a person might ask the waiter, “Πόσο κάνει αυτή η σαλάτα;”

4. Δεν καταλαβαίνω (Then Kah-tah-lah-VEH-noh)

This phrase is used to express confusion or lack of comprehension.

  • For instance, if someone is speaking in a foreign language and you don’t understand, you might say, “Δεν καταλαβαίνω.”
  • When trying to follow complex instructions, a person might admit, “Δεν καταλαβαίνω τι πρέπει να κάνω.”
  • If someone is explaining a difficult concept and you’re having trouble grasping it, you might say, “Δεν καταλαβαίνω αυτό που λες.”

5. Βοήθεια (voh-EE-thee-yah)

This word is used to ask for assistance or support.

  • For example, if someone is in trouble and needs immediate help, they might shout, “Βοήθεια!”
  • When feeling overwhelmed with a task, a person might ask their colleague, “Μπορείς να με βοηθήσεις;”
  • If someone is lost and needs directions, they might approach a stranger and say, “Βοήθεια, πώς πάω στο κέντρο;”

6. Αγαπώ την Ελλάδα (Ah-gah-POH teen Eh-LAH-tha)

This phrase translates to “I love Greece” in English. It is commonly used by Greeks to express their love and affection for their country.

  • For example, a Greek person might say, “Αγαπώ την Ελλάδα! Είναι ο καλύτερος τόπος στον κόσμο!” (I love Greece! It’s the best place in the world!)
  • When asked about their favorite travel destination, a Greek might respond, “Αγαπώ την Ελλάδα. Δεν υπάρχει τίποτα σαν τις ελληνικές παραλίες!” (I love Greece. There’s nothing like the Greek beaches!)
  • A Greek person living abroad might say, “Αγαπώ την Ελλάδα και μου λείπει πολύ. Πάντα θα είναι η πατρίδα μου.” (I love Greece and I miss it a lot. It will always be my homeland.)

7. Ωπα (OH-pa)

This is an exclamation used to express surprise, excitement, or celebration. It is often used in Greek culture during festive occasions, such as weddings or traditional dances.

  • For instance, if someone accidentally drops a plate but it doesn’t break, they might exclaim, “Ωπα!” (Oops!)
  • During a Greek wedding, when the bride and groom are dancing, guests might shout, “Ωπα!” to show their joy and enthusiasm.
  • When someone unexpectedly succeeds at something, they might say, “Ωπα! Δεν περίμενα να τα καταφέρω!” (Oops! I didn’t expect to succeed!)

8. Τι λέει (tee-LEI)

This phrase translates to “What’s up?” or “What’s going on?” in English. It is a common greeting used among Greeks to ask about someone’s well-being or to initiate a conversation.

  • For example, when meeting a friend, one might say, “Γεια σου! Τι λέει;” (Hello! What’s up?)
  • If someone seems upset or preoccupied, a person might ask, “Τι λέει; Είσαι καλά;” (What’s up? Are you okay?)
  • When catching up with a friend, one might say, “Τι λέει; Τι έχεις κάνει τελευταία;” (What’s up? What have you been up to lately?)

9. Που είσαι (pou-eeSAY)

This phrase translates to “Where are you?” in English. It is commonly used to ask about someone’s location or to find someone in a crowded place.

  • For instance, when trying to meet up with a friend, one might call and ask, “Που είσαι;” (Where are you?)
  • If someone is lost or cannot find their way, they might ask a passerby, “Συγνώμη, που είμαστε;” (Excuse me, where are we?)
  • When searching for a friend at a party, one might ask other guests, “Που είναι ο Άρης;” (Where is Aris?)

10. και γαμώ (kay-gaMOU)

This phrase translates to “awesome” or “great” in English. It is a slang expression used to describe something that is impressive, exciting, or enjoyable.

  • For example, when seeing a breathtaking view, one might exclaim, “Και γαμώ!” (Awesome!)
  • If someone tells a funny joke, one might respond with a laugh and say, “Και γαμώ, ρε!” (That’s great, man!)
  • When describing a fantastic experience, one might say, “Πέρασα καλά χθες στο πάρτι. Ήταν και γαμώ!” (I had a great time at the party yesterday. It was awesome!)

11. μαλάκα (maLAka)

This is a Greek slang term used to refer to someone who is considered foolish or stupid. It is often used as a playful insult among friends.

  • For example, a person might jokingly say, “You forgot your keys again? You’re such a μαλάκα.”
  • In a lighthearted argument, someone might tease, “Stop being a μαλάκα and admit you’re wrong.”
  • Among close friends, one might affectionately say, “You’re my favorite μαλάκα.”

12. αργκό (arnkó)

This Greek slang term refers to a specialized vocabulary or set of expressions used within a particular group or subculture. It is similar to the English term “jargon.”

  • For instance, a person might say, “I didn’t understand half of what they were saying. It was all αργκό to me.”
  • In a discussion about a specific profession, someone might mention, “Learning the αργκό of the music industry is essential for success.”
  • A member of a niche community might say, “We have our own αργκό that only true fans understand.”

13. γαμώ (gaMOU)

This Greek slang term is a vulgar expression used to express frustration, anger, or emphasis. It is equivalent to the English f-word.

  • For example, if someone accidentally spills their coffee, they might exclaim, “γαμώ!”
  • In a heated argument, someone might shout, “γαμώ την τύχη μου!” meaning “f*** my luck!”
  • A person expressing extreme disappointment might say, “I can’t believe I failed the test. γαμώ!”

14. χαβαλές (hav-ALES)

This Greek slang term refers to having a good time, joking around, or engaging in playful banter. It can also be used to describe a lighthearted atmosphere or situation.

  • For instance, if someone suggests playing a prank, they might say, “Let’s have some χαβαλές.”
  • In a group of friends laughing and telling jokes, someone might comment, “I love our χαβαλές sessions.”
  • A person describing a fun party might say, “Last night was full of χαβαλές.”

15. φάση (FA-see)

This Greek slang term refers to the overall atmosphere, vibe, or feeling of a situation or experience. It can also describe a specific moment or phase.

  • For example, if someone walks into a party and feels a positive energy, they might say, “This place has a great φάση.”
  • In a conversation about a memorable event, someone might recall, “I’ll never forget the φάση of that concert.”
  • A person describing a challenging phase in their life might say, “I’m going through a tough φάση right now.”

16. παρέα (pa-RE-a)

This word refers to a group of people who hang out together or spend time with each other. It can also mean a gathering or social event.

  • For example, “Let’s go out with our παρέα tonight!”
  • During a party, someone might say, “This is a great παρέα!”
  • When inviting someone to join a group activity, you can say, “Come and be part of our παρέα!”

17. καλημέρα (ka-lee-ME-ra)

This is a common Greek greeting used to say “good morning” to someone. It is a polite and friendly way to start the day.

  • For instance, when meeting someone in the morning, you can say, “καλημέρα!”
  • When entering a room full of people, you can greet everyone with a cheerful “καλημέρα!”
  • A parent might wake up their child with a loving “καλημέρα,“καλημέρα, αγάπη μου!” (good morning, my love!)

18. γεια σου (ya-SOU)

This is a casual and informal way to say “hello” or “goodbye” to someone in Greek. It is commonly used among friends and acquaintances.

  • For example, when meeting a friend, you can greet them with a friendly “γεια σου!”
  • When leaving a gathering, you can say “γεια σου!” to bid farewell to everyone.
  • A person answering the phone might say “γεια σου!” to acknowledge the caller.

19. Μπαγάσας (ba-GA-sas)

This slang term is used to describe someone who is mischievous or causes trouble. It can be used affectionately or in a more negative context, depending on the tone and relationship between the speaker and the person being described.

  • For instance, when teasing a friend who played a prank, you can say, “Είσαι ένας μικρός μπαγάσας!” (You’re a little troublemaker!)
  • When scolding someone for causing trouble, you might say, “Σταμάτα να είσαι μπαγάσας!” (Stop being a troublemaker!)
  • A parent might playfully call their child a “μπαγάσας” when they’re being mischievous.
See also  Top 41 Slang For Permanent – Meaning & Usage

20. Μπουρδέλο (boo-DE-lo)

This slang term is used to describe a chaotic or messy situation. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a situation that is confusing or out of control.

  • For example, when entering a messy room, you might exclaim, “Τι μπουρδέλο είναι αυτό εδώ;” (What a mess is this here?)
  • When discussing a complicated situation, someone might say, “Η κατάσταση είναι ένα μπουρδέλο!” (The situation is a disaster!)
  • A person trying to organize their thoughts might say, “Έχω το μυαλό μου ένα μπουρδέλο!” (My mind is a mess!)

21. Καλαμπούρι (ka-la-MBOO-ree)

This term is used to describe someone who is showing off or trying to be impressive. It can also refer to someone who is acting in a boastful or arrogant manner.

  • For example, “He’s always bragging about his accomplishments. He’s such a καλαμπούρι.”
  • In a group of friends, someone might say, “Stop being a καλαμπούρι and just enjoy the moment.”
  • When someone is trying to impress others, they might be called out with, “You’re just being a καλαμπούρι.”

22. Μαγκιά (ma-GIA)

This word is used to describe someone who is cool, confident, or tough. It can also refer to someone who is resourceful or street-smart.

  • For instance, “He handled that situation with Μαγκιά.”
  • When someone does something impressive, they might be praised with, “That took some Μαγκιά.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I wish I had his Μαγκιά.”

23. Μπαμπάς (ba-BAS)

This term is used to refer to someone’s father. It can also be used more broadly to refer to any older male figure or authority figure.

  • For example, “I’m going to visit my Μπαμπάς this weekend.”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might ask, “How’s your Μπαμπάς doing?”
  • When talking about a mentor or someone respected, someone might say, “He’s like a Μπαμπάς to me.”

24. Μαμά (ma-MA)

This word is used to refer to someone’s mother. It can also be used more broadly to refer to any older female figure or nurturing figure.

  • For instance, “I need to call my Μαμά and check in.”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might ask, “How’s your Μαμά doing?”
  • When talking about someone who takes care of others, someone might say, “She’s like a Μαμά to everyone in the neighborhood.”

25. Παραλία (pa-ra-LEE-a)

This term is used to refer to a beach or shoreline. It can also be used more broadly to describe a coastal area or a place where people gather for leisure activities.

  • For example, “Let’s go to the Παραλία and relax.”
  • In a conversation about vacation plans, someone might say, “I’m thinking of going to a Παραλία this summer.”
  • When reminiscing about a fun day at the beach, someone might say, “That was the best Παραλία trip ever.”

26. Malaka

This is a common Greek slang term that can be used both affectionately and insultingly. It can be used to refer to a friend or someone you are close to, but it can also be used as an insult to someone you dislike.

  • For instance, a Greek person might say, “Hey malaka, how are you?” to their friend.
  • In a heated argument, someone might yell, “You’re such a malaka!”
  • It can also be used as a general exclamation, like “Oh malaka, I can’t believe it!”

27. Kapsoura

This slang term is used to describe a strong feeling of passion or excitement. It can be used to describe a person’s intense enthusiasm or the intense atmosphere of a situation.

  • For example, a Greek person might say, “He has kapsoura for his favorite football team.”
  • In a concert, someone might say, “The crowd is on kapsoura!”
  • It can also be used to describe a fiery or intense personality, like “She’s a kapsoura, always full of energy.”

28. Souvlaki

This is a popular Greek street food made of small pieces of meat (usually pork or chicken) that are grilled on a skewer. It is often served in a pita bread with various toppings and sauces.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Let’s grab some souvlaki for lunch.”
  • In a Greek restaurant, someone might ask, “Do you have vegetarian souvlaki?”
  • It can also be used to refer to the act of grilling meat on a skewer, like “I’m going to souvlaki some chicken for dinner.”

29. Feta

Feta is a type of cheese made from sheep’s milk or a mixture of sheep’s and goat’s milk. It has a tangy and salty taste and is often crumbled over salads or used in Greek dishes.

  • For example, someone might say, “I love feta cheese on my Greek salad.”
  • In a recipe, it might say, “Sprinkle feta over the top before serving.”
  • It can also be used to describe something that is stereotypically Greek, like “Greek cuisine is known for its feta cheese.”

30. Kefi

Kefi is a Greek word that roughly translates to “joyful spirit” or “passionate enthusiasm.” It is used to describe a state of happiness, excitement, or high energy.

  • For instance, a Greek person might say, “Let’s dance and celebrate with kefi!”
  • In a party, someone might exclaim, “The music is so good, it’s giving me kefi!”
  • It can also be used to describe a lively and energetic atmosphere, like “The taverna was filled with kefi and laughter.”

31. Opa

This is a common Greek exclamation used to express joy, excitement, or surprise. It is often accompanied by clapping, dancing, or breaking plates.

  • For example, at a Greek wedding, someone might exclaim, “Opa!” while dancing the traditional Zorba dance.
  • When someone successfully completes a task, they might say, “Opa! I did it!”
  • In a Greek restaurant, a waiter might exclaim, “Opa!” while serving flaming saganaki cheese.

32. Gyro

A gyro is a popular Greek sandwich made with meat, typically lamb or chicken, that is roasted on a vertical spit and then thinly sliced. It is served on pita bread and often topped with tzatziki sauce, tomatoes, onions, and lettuce.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Let’s grab some gyros for lunch.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you prefer lamb or chicken gyro?”
  • In a Greek restaurant, a customer might say, “I’ll have a gyro with extra tzatziki sauce.”

33. Yamas

Yamas is a Greek word that means “to our health” or “cheers.” It is often used when raising a glass to make a toast or when clinking glasses with others.

  • For example, at a Greek celebration, someone might say, “Yamas!” before taking a sip of their drink.
  • When toasting at a wedding, someone might say, “Yamas to the happy couple!”
  • In a Greek taverna, friends might raise their glasses and say, “Yamas!” before enjoying their meal.

34. Parea

Parea refers to a close-knit group of friends who regularly socialize and spend time together. It emphasizes the importance of friendship and camaraderie in Greek culture.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m going out with my parea tonight.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have a parea you hang out with?”
  • When reminiscing about good times, someone might say, “Those were the days with my parea.”

35. Koulouri

Koulouri is a popular Greek snack made of a circular bread ring covered in sesame seeds. It is often sold by street vendors and enjoyed as a quick and tasty treat.

  • For example, someone might say, “I bought a koulouri from the street corner for breakfast.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you prefer plain or sesame koulouri?”
  • When visiting Greece, a tourist might say, “I can’t resist the delicious aroma of freshly baked koulouri.”

36. Baklava

Baklava is a sweet pastry made of layers of filo pastry filled with chopped nuts and sweetened with syrup or honey. It is a popular dessert in Greek cuisine.

  • For example, “I had a delicious slice of baklava for dessert at the Greek restaurant.”
  • A person might say, “Baklava is a traditional Greek dessert that is often served during special occasions.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you know where I can find authentic baklava in this city?”

37. Kafenio

A kafenio is a traditional Greek coffee shop where people gather to socialize, drink coffee, and play backgammon. It is a place where locals come together to relax and enjoy each other’s company.

  • For instance, “Let’s meet at the kafenio for a cup of coffee and a game of backgammon.”
  • A person might say, “Kafenio is an important part of Greek culture and a symbol of community.”
  • Another might ask, “What are the best kafenios in Athens?”

38. Kleftiko

Kleftiko is a traditional Greek dish made with slow-cooked lamb that is marinated with herbs and spices. It is typically cooked in a sealed clay oven to retain the flavors and juices of the meat.

  • For example, “I had the most tender and flavorful kleftiko at a Greek taverna.”
  • A person might say, “Kleftiko is a must-try dish when visiting Greece.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you know any good recipes for making kleftiko at home?”

39. Metaxa

Metaxa is a Greek brandy that is made from a blend of wine distillates, aged in oak barrels, and flavored with botanicals and muscat wines. It is known for its smooth and rich taste.

  • For instance, “I enjoyed a glass of Metaxa after dinner at a Greek restaurant.”
  • A person might say, “Metaxa is a popular Greek spirit that is often enjoyed as a digestif.”
  • Another might ask, “What is the best way to serve Metaxa?”

40. Komboloi

Komboloi is a string of beads that are used as a stress-relief tool in Greek culture. It is often made of amber, coral, or other precious materials and is used by people to pass the time and alleviate anxiety.

  • For example, “I like to play with my komboloi when I’m feeling stressed.”
  • A person might say, “Komboloi is a traditional Greek accessory that is believed to have calming effects.”
  • Another might ask, “Where can I buy a high-quality komboloi?”

41. Tsifteteli

Tsifteteli is a traditional Greek belly dance characterized by fast and rhythmic movements of the hips and abdomen. It is often performed at celebrations and special occasions.

  • For example, at a Greek wedding, the bride might perform a tsifteteli dance to entertain the guests.
  • During a Greek festival, professional dancers might showcase their skills in a tsifteteli performance.
  • A dance instructor might teach a group of students how to do the tsifteteli dance.
See also  Top 15 Slang For Octopus – Meaning & Usage

42. Bouzouki

The bouzouki is a stringed musical instrument used in traditional Greek music. It has a long neck, a pear-shaped body, and typically has three or four double courses of strings. The bouzouki is known for its distinctive sound and is often played at Greek social gatherings.

  • For instance, a Greek musician might play the bouzouki at a taverna to create a lively atmosphere.
  • During a Greek music concert, the bouzouki player might take a solo and showcase their skills.
  • A music enthusiast might collect different types of bouzoukis and appreciate their unique tones.

43. Kefalonia

Kefalonia is a Greek island located in the Ionian Sea. It is known for its beautiful beaches, picturesque villages, and stunning landscapes. Kefalonia is a popular tourist destination and offers a mix of relaxation and adventure.

  • For example, a traveler might visit Kefalonia to explore the famous Myrtos Beach.
  • A nature lover might hike through the rugged mountains of Kefalonia and enjoy the breathtaking views.
  • A food enthusiast might try traditional Greek dishes, such as Kefalonian meat pie, while visiting the island.

44. Sousta

Sousta is a traditional Greek folk dance that originated in Crete but is now popular throughout Greece. It is a lively and energetic dance performed in a circle or line formation. Sousta is often accompanied by traditional Greek music and is a common sight at weddings and festivals.

  • For instance, at a Greek cultural event, participants might gather in a circle and dance the sousta together.
  • During a traditional Greek wedding, the bride and groom might lead the sousta dance as a symbol of celebration.
  • A dance instructor might teach a group of students the steps and movements of the sousta.

45. Zorba

Zorba is a famous Greek dance and character that has become synonymous with Greek culture. The dance, also known as the sirtaki, is a lively and exuberant dance performed in a line formation. Zorba the character, popularized by the novel and film “Zorba the Greek,” represents a free-spirited and passionate individual.

  • For example, at Greek festivals, participants might join in a Zorba dance and celebrate together.
  • A theater production might include a scene where the character Zorba performs a dynamic dance.
  • A person with a free-spirited personality might be described as having a “Zorba-like” zest for life.

46. Mati

The mati, also known as the evil eye, is a belief in Greek culture that certain individuals have the power to cause harm or bad luck with a single look. It is often used as a protective symbol to ward off the evil eye.

  • For example, a person might wear a mati pendant or hang a mati charm in their home to protect against the evil eye.
  • If someone compliments a Greek person’s new car, they might respond with “Mati, mati” to deflect any potential envy.
  • In a conversation about superstitions, someone might say, “I always carry a mati keychain for good luck.”

47. Yia-Yia

Yia-yia is the Greek word for grandmother. It is often used as a term of endearment for one’s grandmother or as a way to refer to any older woman in a nurturing role.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m going to visit my yia-yia this weekend.”
  • In a discussion about family traditions, someone might mention, “My yia-yia taught me how to make traditional Greek dishes.”
  • If someone is looking for advice, they might say, “Let’s ask yia-yia, she always knows what to do.”

48. Pappou

Pappou is the Greek word for grandfather. It is often used as a term of endearment for one’s grandfather or as a way to refer to any older man in a respected role.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going fishing with my pappou this weekend.”
  • In a conversation about family history, someone might mention, “My pappou immigrated to the United States from Greece.”
  • If someone is sharing a childhood memory, they might say, “I used to sit on my pappou’s lap and listen to his stories.”

49. Kalamata

Kalamata is a type of olive that is native to Greece. It is known for its dark purple color, meaty texture, and rich flavor. Kalamata olives are often used in Greek cuisine and are a popular ingredient in dishes such as Greek salads and olive tapenade.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I love the taste of kalamata olives in a Greek salad.”
  • In a discussion about Mediterranean cuisine, someone might mention, “Kalamata olives are a staple in Greek cooking.”
  • If someone is sharing a recipe, they might say, “Add a handful of chopped kalamata olives for an extra burst of flavor.”

50. Ellada

Ellada is the Greek word for Greece. It is often used to refer to the country or its people.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m planning a trip to Ellada next summer.”
  • In a conversation about Greek history, someone might mention, “Ellada was the birthplace of democracy.”
  • If someone is discussing Greek culture, they might say, “Ellada has a rich tradition of music and dance.”

51. Philotimo

Philotimo is a Greek concept that encompasses a sense of duty, honor, and respect for others. It is often described as the love of honor. It is considered a core value in Greek culture and is reflected in one’s actions and behaviors.

  • For example, a person might say, “He showed great philotimo by helping his neighbor in need.”
  • When discussing Greek values, one might mention, “Philotimo is deeply ingrained in Greek society and influences how people interact with each other.”
  • A Greek parent might teach their child, “Always act with philotimo and treat others with respect.”

52. Ouzo

Ouzo is a popular Greek alcoholic beverage that is flavored with anise. It has a distinct licorice-like taste and is often enjoyed as an aperitif or with meze (small dishes). Ouzo is closely associated with Greek culture and is often enjoyed during social gatherings.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Let’s have a glass of ouzo before dinner.”
  • When describing Greek cuisine, one might mention, “Ouzo is a traditional Greek spirit that pairs well with seafood.”
  • A tourist visiting Greece might try ouzo and comment, “I love the unique flavor of ouzo!”

53. Koulourakia

Koulourakia are traditional Greek butter cookies that are often enjoyed during special occasions, such as Easter or Christmas. They have a slightly sweet and buttery flavor and are often shaped into twists or braids. Koulourakia are a beloved treat in Greek households.

  • For example, a person might say, “My grandmother makes the best koulourakia for Easter.”
  • When discussing Greek desserts, one might mention, “Koulourakia are a staple during holiday celebrations.”
  • A Greek family might gather together to bake koulourakia and share stories, creating fond memories.

54. Tsipouro

Tsipouro is a traditional Greek spirit that is produced by distilling the pomace (leftover skins, seeds, and stems) of grapes. It is similar to other grape-based spirits such as grappa or rakı. Tsipouro is often enjoyed as a digestif and is known for its strong flavor.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Let’s have a shot of tsipouro after dinner to aid digestion.”
  • When describing Greek drinks, one might mention, “Tsipouro is a popular spirit in Greece, especially in the regions where it is produced.”
  • A visitor to Greece might try tsipouro and comment, “The flavor of tsipouro is intense, but it’s a unique experience.”

55. Kefalograviera

Kefalograviera is a type of Greek cheese that is made from sheep’s or goat’s milk. It is a hard cheese with a rich and slightly salty flavor. Kefalograviera is often enjoyed as a table cheese or used in cooking, particularly in dishes like saganaki (fried cheese).

  • For example, a person might say, “I love pairing kefalograviera with some olives and bread.”
  • When discussing Greek cuisine, one might mention, “Kefalograviera is a versatile cheese that can be enjoyed on its own or used in various dishes.”
  • A cheese enthusiast might try kefalograviera and comment, “The texture of kefalograviera is firm and the flavor is robust.”

56. Loukoumades

Loukoumades are a popular Greek dessert made of deep-fried dough balls soaked in honey syrup. They are often served with a sprinkle of cinnamon and crushed walnuts.

  • For example, “I can’t resist a plate of loukoumades drizzled with honey.”
  • A person might say, “Loukoumades are the perfect sweet treat to end a Greek meal.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I could eat a whole plate of loukoumades in one sitting!”

57. Tsoureki

Tsoureki is a traditional Greek sweet bread that is often baked and served during Easter. It is typically flavored with orange zest and decorated with red-dyed eggs.

  • For instance, “I look forward to eating tsoureki every Easter.”
  • A person might say, “Tsoureki is a staple at Greek Orthodox Easter celebrations.”
  • Another might share, “My grandmother’s tsoureki recipe has been passed down for generations.”

58. Tzatziki

Tzatziki is a popular Greek sauce or dip made with yogurt, cucumbers, garlic, and herbs like dill or mint. It is often served as a condiment with grilled meats or as a dip with pita bread.

  • For example, “I love dipping my gyro in tzatziki.”
  • A person might say, “Tzatziki adds a cool and refreshing flavor to any dish.”
  • Another might recommend, “Try making your own tzatziki at home with fresh ingredients.”

59. Spanakopita

Spanakopita is a traditional Greek savory pastry made with layers of phyllo dough filled with a mixture of spinach, feta cheese, onions, and herbs. It is typically baked until golden and crispy.

  • For instance, “I could eat a whole tray of spanakopita.”
  • A person might say, “Spanakopita is a delicious appetizer or side dish.”
  • Another might share, “My mom makes the best homemade spanakopita.”

60. Dolmades

Dolmades are a popular Greek dish made with grape leaves stuffed with a mixture of rice, herbs, and sometimes ground meat. They are typically served as an appetizer or part of a meze platter.

  • For example, “I always order dolmades when I go to a Greek restaurant.”
  • A person might say, “Dolmades are a flavorful and bite-sized treat.”
  • Another might recommend, “Try making your own dolmades with fresh grape leaves.”

61. Metrio

In Greek, “metrio” means medium and is often used to describe the sweetness level of coffee or other beverages. It refers to a moderate level of sweetness, neither too sweet nor too bitter.

  • For example, when ordering coffee, someone might say, “I’ll have a metrio, please.”
  • A person discussing their preference for drinks might say, “I like my tea metrio, not too sweet.”
  • In a cafe, a waiter might ask, “Would you like your frappe glyko (sweet), metrio (medium), or sketo (plain)?”

62. Kali Orexi

“Kali Orexi” is a Greek phrase used to wish someone a good appetite before a meal. It is similar to saying “bon appétit” in French or “enjoy your meal” in English.

  • For instance, when serving food, a host might say, “Kali Orexi, please help yourself.”
  • A person might send a text message to a friend before a dinner party, saying, “Looking forward to seeing you tonight. Kali Orexi!”
  • In a restaurant, a waiter might say, “Here is your dish. Kali Orexi!”

63. Kourabiedes

Kourabiedes are traditional Greek almond cookies that are often served during festive occasions, such as Christmas and weddings. They are usually made with butter, powdered sugar, and almonds, and have a crumbly texture.

  • For example, a person might say, “I love the taste of kourabiedes during the holiday season.”
  • During a family gathering, someone might offer a plate of kourabiedes and say, “Try these homemade almond cookies.”
  • In a bakery, a customer might ask, “Do you have any kourabiedes left?”

64. Retsina

Retsina is a type of Greek wine that is flavored with pine resin. The resin gives the wine a distinct flavor and aroma. It is often enjoyed with traditional Greek dishes.

  • For instance, a wine enthusiast might say, “I tried a delicious Retsina during my trip to Greece.”
  • During a Greek dinner, someone might pour a glass of Retsina and say, “Let’s toast with this traditional Greek wine.”
  • In a wine tasting event, a sommelier might explain, “Retsina is a unique wine that pairs well with Greek cuisine.”

65. Saganaki

Saganaki refers to a Greek dish that consists of various types of cheese, typically sheep’s milk cheese, that is breaded and fried. It is often served as an appetizer and is known for its crispy exterior and melted cheese interior.

  • For example, a person might say, “I love the crispy texture of saganaki.”
  • At a Greek restaurant, a waiter might recommend, “You should try our saganaki as an appetizer.”
  • During a gathering, someone might offer a plate of saganaki and say, “Help yourself to some fried cheese.”

66. Kalamaki

Kalamaki refers to a type of Greek street food that consists of grilled meat or vegetables on a skewer. It is a popular and convenient option for a quick meal.

  • For example, “Let’s grab some kalamaki for lunch.”
  • A person might say, “I love the chicken kalamaki with tzatziki sauce.”
  • Another might comment, “The kalamaki from that food truck is the best in town.”

67. Taramasalata

Taramasalata is a traditional Greek dip made from fish roe (usually cod or carp), olive oil, lemon juice, and bread or potatoes. It is typically served as an appetizer with bread or pita.

  • For instance, “I always order taramasalata when I go to a Greek restaurant.”
  • A person might say, “The taramasalata has a rich and creamy texture.”
  • Another might comment, “I love the tangy flavor of taramasalata.”

68. Melitzanosalata

Melitzanosalata is a Greek dip made from roasted eggplant, garlic, olive oil, lemon juice, and various herbs and spices. It is often served as a spread or dip with bread or pita.

  • For example, “I can’t resist melitzanosalata with warm pita bread.”
  • A person might say, “The smoky flavor of the roasted eggplant really shines in melitzanosalata.”
  • Another might comment, “I love the creamy texture of melitzanosalata.”

69. Gigantes

Gigantes are large white beans that are a staple in Greek cuisine. They are often cooked in a tomato-based sauce with herbs and spices, and served as a side dish or part of a meze platter.

  • For instance, “I always order the gigantes as a side when I eat Greek food.”
  • A person might say, “The gigantes are tender and flavorful.”
  • Another might comment, “The tomato sauce really complements the creamy texture of the gigantes.”

70. Loukaniko

Loukaniko is a type of Greek sausage made from ground pork that is flavored with various herbs and spices, such as orange zest, fennel, and oregano. It is often grilled or pan-fried and served as part of a meal or in sandwiches.

  • For example, “I love the smoky flavor of loukaniko.”
  • A person might say, “Loukaniko pairs well with tzatziki sauce.”
  • Another might comment, “The spices in loukaniko give it a unique and delicious taste.”

71. Pastitsio

Pastitsio is a traditional Greek dish that is similar to lasagna. It is made with layers of pasta, ground meat, and béchamel sauce, and is typically baked in the oven.

  • For example, “I’m craving some pastitsio for dinner tonight.”
  • A Greek restaurant might offer, “Try our delicious homemade pastitsio.”
  • A food blogger might write, “Learn how to make authentic pastitsio with this recipe.”

72. Mousaka

Mousaka is a classic Greek dish that is similar to a casserole. It is made with layers of eggplant, ground meat, and béchamel sauce, and is typically baked in the oven.

  • For instance, “I love the rich flavors of mousaka.”
  • A Greek cookbook might feature, “Traditional mousaka recipe passed down through generations.”
  • A restaurant menu might list, “Vegetarian mousaka option available upon request.”

73. Souzoukakia

Souzoukakia are Greek meatballs that are typically made with ground beef or lamb, seasoned with herbs and spices, and cooked in a tomato-based sauce. They are often served with rice or bread.

  • For example, “These souzoukakia are so flavorful and tender.”
  • A Greek deli might advertise, “Authentic souzoukakia made fresh daily.”
  • A food critic might write, “The souzoukakia at this restaurant are a must-try.”

74. Gemista

Gemista refers to a Greek dish that consists of vegetables, such as tomatoes or peppers, that are hollowed out and stuffed with a mixture of rice, herbs, and sometimes ground meat. They are then baked until tender.

  • For instance, “Gemista is a delicious and healthy vegetarian option.”
  • A Greek family might share, “Our gemista recipe has been passed down for generations.”
  • A food blogger might post, “Learn how to make traditional gemista with this step-by-step guide.”

75. Galaktoboureko

Galaktoboureko is a Greek dessert made with layers of phyllo pastry and a creamy semolina custard filling. It is typically sweetened with syrup and served chilled.

  • For example, “I love the flaky layers of galaktoboureko.”
  • A Greek bakery might offer, “Authentic galaktoboureko made fresh daily.”
  • A dessert enthusiast might write, “The creamy custard in galaktoboureko is simply divine.”

76. Loukoumi

A sweet treat made from gelatin, sugar, and flavorings such as rosewater or lemon. It is often dusted with powdered sugar and comes in various flavors and shapes.

  • For example, “I bought a box of loukoumi from the Greek bakery.”
  • During a holiday celebration, someone might offer, “Would you like a piece of loukoumi?”
  • A person reminiscing about their childhood might say, “My grandmother used to make homemade loukoumi for special occasions.”

77. Kourkoubinia

A type of Greek pastry that is deep-fried and typically dipped in syrup or honey. Kourkoubinia are usually small in size and have a round shape.

  • For instance, “I love eating kourkoubinia with my coffee in the morning.”
  • During a festival, a vendor might sell, “Freshly made kourkoubinia, get them while they’re hot!”
  • A person sharing their baking experience might say, “I tried making kourkoubinia at home, and they turned out delicious!”

78. Fasolada

A traditional Greek soup made with white beans, vegetables, and herbs. Fasolada is often considered the national dish of Greece and is a popular choice during Lent or on meatless days.

  • For example, “My grandmother makes the best fasolada, especially during the winter.”
  • A person looking for a comforting meal might ask, “Do you have any recipes for homemade fasolada?”
  • During a conversation about Greek cuisine, someone might mention, “Fasolada is a staple dish in Greek households.”

79. Revani

A Greek dessert made with semolina, sugar, eggs, and flavored with lemon or orange. Revani is typically soaked in a sweet syrup and often garnished with almonds or coconut.

  • For instance, “I tried revani for the first time at a Greek restaurant, and it was delicious.”
  • A person sharing their baking success might say, “I made a revani cake for my family, and everyone loved it!”
  • During a holiday gathering, someone might offer, “Would you like a slice of revani? It’s homemade.”

80. Halva

Halva is a dense, sweet confection made from ingredients such as sesame paste, sugar, honey, or tahini. It can also include additional ingredients like nuts or dried fruits.

  • For example, “I bought a box of halva from the Greek market as a gift.”
  • A person discussing their favorite Greek desserts might say, “Halva is one of my go-to treats.”
  • During a conversation about international cuisines, someone might mention, “Halva is a popular dessert in many Mediterranean countries.”