Top 50 Slang For Green – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to talking about all things related to the color green, there’s a whole new language out there that’s worth exploring. From nature-inspired terms to eco-friendly phrases, we’ve got you covered with a list of the top slang words that celebrate all things green. So, whether you’re a fan of sustainability or just love the color, get ready to add some fresh new words to your vocabulary with our exciting compilation!

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1. Greenback

This term refers to a US paper currency, specifically the one-dollar bill. The term “greenback” originated from the green ink used to print the currency.

  • For example, “I need to earn some greenbacks to pay my bills.”
  • A person might say, “I found a few greenbacks in my old jacket pocket.”
  • In a discussion about the economy, someone might mention, “The value of the greenback has fluctuated over the years.”

2. Dough

This slang term is used to refer to money in general. It is often associated with cash or funds.

  • For instance, “I need to save up some dough before I can go on vacation.”
  • A person might say, “I spent all my dough on concert tickets.”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, someone might mention, “I’m trying to earn more dough to invest in my future.”

3. Cash

This term is commonly used to refer to physical money in the form of bills or notes, as opposed to digital or electronic forms of payment.

  • For example, “I prefer to pay with cash instead of using a credit card.”
  • A person might say, “I need to withdraw some cash from the ATM.”
  • In a discussion about financial transactions, someone might mention, “Cash is still widely accepted in many places.”

4. Bills

This slang term is often used to refer to paper currency, especially in the form of dollar bills.

  • For instance, “I need to pay my bills before the due date.”
  • A person might say, “I have a stack of bills in my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about managing expenses, someone might mention, “I have a system for organizing my bills and receipts.”

5. Cheddar

This term is used to refer to money, particularly a significant amount of it. It is often associated with wealth or financial success.

  • For example, “He’s rolling in cheddar after winning the lottery.”
  • A person might say, “I need to hustle and earn some cheddar.”
  • In a discussion about career goals, someone might mention, “I’m working hard to make cheddar and achieve financial stability.”

6. Stacks

“I just made a big sale, now I got stacks of cash.”

  • Someone might say, “I need to hustle and make some stacks.”
  • In a discussion about wealth, a person might comment, “He’s got stacks of money, he must be doing well.”

7. Bread

“I need to find a job and start making some bread.”

  • A person might say, “I’m going to the ATM to get some bread.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might mention, “I need to save up some bread for a vacation.”

8. Benjamins

“I just got my paycheck, and it’s full of Benjamins.”

  • Someone might say, “I’m going to make it rain Benjamins at the club.”
  • In a discussion about wealth, a person might comment, “He’s rolling in Benjamins, he must be rich.”

9. Loot

“He got caught with a bag of loot.”

  • Someone might say, “I need to find a way to get some quick loot.”
  • In a conversation about crime, a person might mention, “They robbed the bank and made off with a lot of loot.”

10. Green stuff

“I need to find a job and start earning some green stuff.”

  • A person might say, “I’m broke, I don’t have any green stuff.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might mention, “I’m saving up some green stuff for a down payment on a car.”

11. Cabbage

This slang term refers to money, specifically paper currency. It is believed to have originated from the idea that money is green, like cabbage leaves.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to save up some cabbage before I can go on vacation.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might mention, “I’ve got a lot of cabbage invested in the stock market.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me some cabbage until payday?”

12. Cheese

This term is used to refer to money, particularly cash. The origin of this slang word is unclear, but it may be related to the idea that money is a “cheddar” or a valuable commodity.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t go out tonight, I’m short on cheese.”
  • In a discussion about finances, a person might mention, “I need to make some more cheese to pay off my debts.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have any extra cheese I can borrow?”

13. Scratch

This slang term is used to refer to money, especially cash. It is believed to have originated from the idea that people have to “scratch” or work hard to earn money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to find a side hustle to earn some scratch.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might mention, “I’ve got some extra scratch saved up for emergencies.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me some scratch until I get paid?”

14. Wad

This slang term refers to a large amount of money, usually in the form of cash. It is thought to have originated from the idea of a wad of bills being thick and substantial.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He pulled out a wad of cash to pay for the meal.”
  • In a discussion about finances, a person might mention, “I’ve been saving up a wad of money for a down payment on a house.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have a wad I can borrow? I’ll pay you back next week.”

15. Bankroll

This term is used to refer to a large sum of money, typically in the form of cash. It is believed to have originated from the idea that a person’s wealth is like a roll of bills kept in a bank.

  • For example, someone might say, “He used his bankroll to start his own business.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might mention, “I need to build up my bankroll before I can invest in real estate.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me some money? I’m short on my bankroll this month.”

16. Greenbacks

This term refers to U.S. paper currency, particularly the dollar bills. “Greenbacks” originated during the American Civil War when the U.S. government issued green-colored currency notes.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to save up some greenbacks for my vacation.”
  • In a discussion about finances, a person might mention, “Investing in stocks can help you grow your greenbacks.”
  • A person might jokingly say, “I wish my wallet was filled with greenbacks instead of receipts.”

17. Bucks

This slang term is commonly used to refer to U.S. dollars. It is derived from the term “buckskin,” which was a common medium of exchange in early America.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll pay you 20 bucks for that concert ticket.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, a person might say, “I spent 50 bucks on groceries this week.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me a few bucks until payday?”

18. Green

This term is a shorthand way of referring to money, particularly U.S. currency. It is derived from the color of U.S. dollar bills.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to make some green to pay my bills.”
  • In a discussion about financial success, a person might say, “I’m working hard to earn more green.”
  • A person might joke, “I wish I had a money tree that produced infinite green.”

19. Simoleons

This slang term is used to refer to money in general. It originated from the video game “The Sims,” where “Simoleons” is the in-game currency.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to save up some simoleons for a new car.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, a person might say, “I’m trying to cut back on unnecessary spending to save more simoleons.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any spare simoleons? I’m short on cash.”

20. Skrilla

This term is slang for money, particularly a large amount of it. Its origin is uncertain, but it is commonly used in hip-hop culture.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m hustling to make that skrilla.”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, a person might say, “I’m working hard to stack up that skrilla.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I just got a big bonus at work, so I’m swimming in skrilla!”

21. Gs

This term refers to money or dollars. It is derived from the word “grand,” which is often used to represent one thousand dollars. The term “Gs” is slang for “grand” and is used to refer to money in general.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just made a couple of Gs from that side hustle.”
  • In a discussion about finances, a person might mention, “I need to save up a few Gs for that vacation.”
  • A rapper might boast, “I’m making Gs every day with my music career.”

22. Big ones

This term is used to refer to large amounts of money. It is a casual way of expressing a significant sum of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just won a big one at the casino.”
  • In a conversation about investments, a person might mention, “I made some big ones in the stock market.”
  • A friend might ask, “Did you see John’s new car? He must have spent some big ones on it.”

23. C-notes

This term specifically refers to one-hundred dollar bills. The “C” in “C-notes” stands for “centum,” which means one hundred in Latin.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I paid for the concert tickets with a few C-notes.”
  • In a discussion about cash, a person might mention, “I always carry a couple of C-notes in case of emergencies.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me a few C-notes? I’ll pay you back next week.”

24. Dinero

This term is derived from the Spanish word for money. It is used as a slang term for money in general.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to make some quick dinero to pay my bills.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might mention, “I’m saving up my dinero for a down payment on a house.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have any extra dinero? I forgot my wallet.”

25. Cake

This term is used to refer to money. It is a metaphorical way of expressing the value or importance of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to find a job that pays good cake.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, a person might mention, “My main priority is to make enough cake to support my family.”
  • A friend might ask, “How much cake did you make from that freelance gig?”

26. Bank

This term refers to a large amount of money or wealth. It can also be used to indicate financial stability or success.

  • For example, “He made a lot of money and now he’s sitting on the bank.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s wealth, one might say, “She’s got so much bank, she could buy anything she wants.”
  • A person might use this term to describe their own financial situation, saying, “I’ve been saving up and now I’ve got some serious bank.”

27. Moola

This slang term is used to refer to money, especially in the form of physical bills or cash.

  • For instance, “I need some moola to pay for this concert ticket.”
  • In a discussion about finances, one might say, “I’ve got to save up some moola for my vacation.”
  • A person might use this term to describe finding unexpected money, saying, “I just found $20 on the ground. Easy moola!”

28. Stash

This word is used to describe a secret or hidden collection of money or valuable items. It often implies that the stash is being kept for future use or in case of emergencies.

  • For example, “He keeps a stash of cash under his mattress in case of emergencies.”
  • In a conversation about saving money, one might say, “I’ve been building up my stash for a rainy day.”
  • A person might use this term to describe finding their hidden money, saying, “I just found my secret stash in the back of my closet!”

29. Chips

This slang term is used to refer to money. It can also be used to describe poker chips or casino tokens.

  • For instance, “I need some chips to buy a snack from the vending machine.”
  • In a discussion about finances, one might say, “I’ve got to save up some chips for my vacation.”
  • A person might use this term to describe finding unexpected money, saying, “I just found $5 in my pocket. Free chips!”

30. Coin

This term is used to refer to money, particularly in the form of coins or loose change.

  • For example, “I need some coin to do my laundry.”
  • In a conversation about finances, one might say, “I’ve been saving up my coin for a new video game.”
  • A person might use this term to describe finding unexpected money, saying, “I just found a quarter on the ground. Lucky coin!”

31. Folding stuff

This term refers to paper currency, specifically bills that can be folded. It is a slang term for money in general.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need some folding stuff to pay for this dinner.”
  • In a conversation about finances, one person might ask, “How much folding stuff do you have saved up?”
  • A character in a movie might say, “I’ll do anything for a little folding stuff.”

32. Long green

This slang term refers to paper money, particularly bills that are green in color. “Long green” is a way to describe cash or money in general.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ve got a lot of long green after my recent promotion.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, one person might say, “I’m working hard to earn some long green.”
  • A character in a book might say, “He flashed a wad of long green to impress the crowd.”

33. G’s

This term is a shortened version of “grand” which means a thousand dollars. It is often used to refer to a specific amount of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just spent 5 G’s on a new computer.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, one person might ask, “How much did that car cost? A few G’s?”
  • A character in a TV show might say, “I need to earn 10 G’s by the end of the month.”

34. Greenery

This term is a slang word for money, specifically cash. It is often used in a casual or playful manner.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to hit the ATM and grab some greenery.”
  • In a discussion about finances, one person might ask, “Do you have enough greenery to cover the bill?”
  • A character in a movie might say, “I’ll do anything for a little extra greenery.”

35. C-note

This term refers to a one hundred dollar bill. The “C” in “C-note” is derived from the Roman numeral “C” which represents the number 100.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just found a C-note on the ground!”
  • In a conversation about expenses, one person might say, “I can’t believe I spent a whole C-note on dinner.”
  • A character in a book might say, “He handed over a C-note as a generous tip.”

36. Franklin

This slang term refers to the one hundred dollar bill, which features a portrait of Benjamin Franklin. It is often used to talk about money or wealth.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t believe he spent a Franklin on that meal!”
  • In a conversation about finances, one might ask, “Do you have any Franklins saved up for emergencies?”
  • A person might boast, “I made a Franklin last night at the casino!”

37. Gouda

This slang term is derived from the name of a type of cheese, Gouda. It is used to refer to money, specifically a significant amount of it.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to start saving some Gouda for my vacation.”
  • In a discussion about salaries, one might ask, “How much Gouda are they paying you?”
  • A person might exclaim, “I just made some serious Gouda from that business deal!”

38. Skrill

This slang term is used to refer to money or cash. It is a variation of the word “skrilla,” which is a term for money commonly used in hip-hop culture.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to hit the ATM and get some Skrill.”
  • In a conversation about finances, one might ask, “Do you have enough Skrill to cover the expenses?”
  • A person might brag, “I’m rolling in Skrill after that big promotion!”

39. Gelt

This slang term is derived from Yiddish and is used to refer to money or wealth. It is often associated with Jewish culture and is commonly used during the holiday of Hanukkah to refer to chocolate coins given as gifts.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to earn some extra Gelt to afford that vacation.”
  • In a discussion about finances, one might ask, “How much Gelt do you have saved up?”
  • A person might joke, “I’m still waiting for my Gelt to come in the mail!”

40. Smackers

This slang term is used to refer to dollars or money. It is often used in a playful or casual manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll give you fifty smackers for that old video game.”
  • In a conversation about finances, one might ask, “How many smackers did you spend on that shopping spree?”
  • A person might comment, “I found twenty smackers in my pocket. Score!”

41. Green-eyed monster

This phrase refers to the feeling of envy or jealousy. It is often used to describe someone who is consumed by jealousy.

  • For example, “She couldn’t stand seeing her ex with someone new. The green-eyed monster took over.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “Jealousy is the green-eyed monster that can destroy trust.”
  • A person might admit, “I have to admit, I felt a twinge of the green-eyed monster when my friend got a promotion.”

42. Green thumb

This term is used to describe someone who has a natural talent or skill for gardening. It implies that the person has a green thumb, meaning they have a knack for growing plants.

  • For instance, “My grandmother has a green thumb. Her garden is always thriving.”
  • In a conversation about plants, someone might say, “I wish I had a green thumb like my neighbor. All my plants seem to die.”
  • A person might ask for gardening advice by saying, “Any tips for someone with a brown thumb trying to develop a green thumb?”

43. Greenhorn

This term is used to describe someone who is new or inexperienced in a particular field or activity. It can also refer to someone who is naive or gullible.

  • For example, “He’s a greenhorn when it comes to fishing. He has a lot to learn.”
  • In a discussion about a new employee, someone might say, “We’ll need to train the greenhorn on company procedures.”
  • A person might admit, “I was a greenhorn when I first started college. I had no idea what to expect.”

44. Green-eyed

This term is used to describe someone who is envious or jealous of someone else’s success or possessions. It refers to the green color often associated with jealousy.

  • For instance, “She gave her friend a green-eyed look when she saw the new designer handbag.”
  • In a conversation about competition, someone might say, “It’s natural to feel green-eyed when someone else succeeds, but we should focus on our own journey.”
  • A person might admit, “I have to confess, I felt a bit green-eyed when my coworker got a promotion.”

45. Green around the gills

This phrase is used to describe someone who looks pale or sickly, often due to nausea or illness.

  • For example, “He turned green around the gills after eating that expired food.”
  • In a discussion about seasickness, someone might say, “I always turn green around the gills when I’m on a boat.”
  • A person might describe their own condition by saying, “I’m feeling green around the gills today. I think I caught a bug.”

46. Green with envy

When someone is “green with envy,” it means they are extremely jealous of someone else’s success, possessions, or advantages.

  • For example, “She was green with envy when she saw her friend’s brand new car.”
  • In a conversation about a promotion at work, someone might say, “I’m green with envy over John’s new position.”
  • A person might comment on social media, “I’m so green with envy seeing all your vacation photos!”

47. Green light

To give someone the “green light” means to give them approval or permission to proceed with a plan or action.

  • For instance, “The boss finally gave us the green light to start the project.”
  • In a discussion about a new business venture, someone might say, “We’re just waiting for the investors to give us the green light.”
  • A person might tell their friend, “I got the green light from my parents to go to the party.”

48. Green room

The term “green room” refers to a backstage area where performers or guests wait before going on stage or appearing on a show.

  • For example, “The band members were relaxing in the green room before the concert.”
  • In a conversation about a talk show, someone might say, “I got to meet the celebrity in the green room before the interview.”
  • A performer might post on social media, “Just hanging out in the green room before my big performance!”

49. Green belt

In martial arts or other disciplines, a “green belt” typically represents a beginner or intermediate level of skill or achievement.

  • For instance, “She recently earned her green belt in karate.”
  • In a discussion about a taekwondo tournament, someone might say, “I’m competing in the green belt division.”
  • A martial artist might post, “Just passed my green belt test! On to the next level!”

50. Green card

A “green card” is an identification card issued by the United States government to foreign nationals, granting them permanent residency in the country.

  • For example, “She finally received her green card after years of waiting.”
  • In a conversation about immigration, someone might say, “He’s applying for a green card to live and work in the US.”
  • A person might post on social media, “Exciting news! I just got my green card approved!”
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