Top 40 Slang For Gypsies – Meaning & Usage

Gypsies, with their rich cultural heritage and nomadic lifestyle, have a language all their own. From colorful expressions to unique words that capture the essence of their way of life, this listicle is your guide to the top slang for gypsies. Join us as we explore the fascinating world of gypsy slang and gain a deeper understanding of their vibrant community. Get ready to expand your vocabulary and gain insight into a culture that is as diverse as it is fascinating.

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1. Rom

This term refers to the Romani people, who are an ethnic group with origins in India and a long history of migration throughout Europe.

  • For example, “The Rom have a rich cultural heritage, including traditional music and dance.”
  • In a conversation about diversity, someone might say, “The Rom are an important part of Europe’s cultural tapestry.”
  • A person discussing discrimination might point out, “The Rom face significant challenges and prejudice in many countries.”

2. Traveller

This term is used to describe a community of people who live a nomadic lifestyle, often traveling in caravans or trailers.

  • For instance, “The Traveller community has a unique culture and traditions.”
  • In a discussion about alternative lifestyles, someone might say, “Many Travellers choose to live off the grid and embrace a simpler way of life.”
  • A person interested in cultural anthropology might study, “The history and customs of Traveller communities around the world.”

3. Tinker

This term can refer to a person who works with metal, often repairing or creating items. It can also be used as a derogatory slang term for a Gypsy.

  • For example, “He’s a skilled tinker who can fix anything.”
  • In a conversation about craftsmanship, someone might say, “Tinkers have a long tradition of creating beautiful and functional metalwork.”
  • A person using the term in a derogatory way might make a comment like, “Don’t trust that tinker, he’ll rip you off.”

4. Gypo

This slang term is a derogatory and offensive way to refer to a Gypsy or Traveller.

  • For instance, “Using the term ‘gypo’ is highly disrespectful and perpetuates stereotypes.”
  • In a discussion about discrimination, someone might say, “Words like ‘gypo’ contribute to marginalization and prejudice.”
  • A person educating others about respectful language might explain, “It’s important to avoid using derogatory terms like ‘gypo’ and instead use inclusive language.”

5. Pikey

This slang term is a derogatory and offensive way to refer to a Gypsy or Traveller. It is considered highly disrespectful and should be avoided.

  • For example, “Using the term ‘pikey’ is hurtful and perpetuates negative stereotypes.”
  • In a conversation about inclusivity, someone might say, “We should strive to create a society where derogatory terms like ‘pikey’ have no place.”
  • A person advocating for equality might point out, “Using slurs like ‘pikey’ only serves to divide us and perpetuate discrimination.”

6. Gypsy Soul

This term refers to someone who has a restless and adventurous nature, often associated with the Romani culture. It signifies a person who is constantly seeking new experiences and has a deep connection with their inner self.

  • For example, a traveler might describe themselves as having a “gypsy soul” because they are always on the move and crave new adventures.
  • Someone might say, “I can’t stay in one place for too long, I have a gypsy soul.”
  • A person with a love for exploration and independence might consider themselves to have a “gypsy soul.”

7. Traveler of the Road

This term refers to someone who travels frequently and has no fixed abode. It signifies a person who embraces a nomadic lifestyle and is constantly on the move, often living in temporary accommodations.

  • For instance, a person who lives in a van and travels from place to place might identify themselves as a “traveler of the road.”
  • Someone might say, “I’ve been a traveler of the road for the past five years, and I wouldn’t have it any other way.”
  • A person who enjoys the freedom of not being tied down to a specific location might describe themselves as a “traveler of the road.”

8. Wanderer

This term refers to someone who wanders aimlessly or travels without a specific destination in mind. It signifies a person who enjoys exploring different places and has a strong sense of adventure.

  • For example, a person who takes spontaneous trips to unfamiliar locations might consider themselves a “wanderer.”
  • Someone might say, “I have a restless spirit, always seeking new experiences. I guess you could call me a wanderer.”
  • A person who prefers to wander and discover new places rather than following a set itinerary might describe themselves as a “wanderer.”

9. Nomad

This term refers to someone who has no permanent home and moves from place to place. It signifies a person who leads a nomadic lifestyle and relies on temporary shelters or accommodations.

  • For instance, a person who lives in a yurt and changes locations frequently might identify themselves as a “nomad.”
  • Someone might say, “I’ve always been drawn to a nomadic lifestyle, constantly seeking new horizons.”
  • A person who embraces a minimalist lifestyle and values experiences over material possessions might describe themselves as a “nomad.”

10. Roamer

This term refers to someone who roams or travels without a specific purpose or destination. It signifies a person who enjoys exploring different places and has a sense of freedom and independence.

  • For example, a person who takes road trips to discover new locations might consider themselves a “roamer.”
  • Someone might say, “I have an insatiable desire to explore. I’m a roamer at heart.”
  • A person who enjoys the thrill of not knowing where they’ll end up next might describe themselves as a “roamer.”
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11. Vardo

A vardo is a traditional wagon or caravan used by Romani people. It is often elaborately decorated and serves as a home on wheels.

  • For example, “The Romani family traveled from town to town in their colorful vardo.”
  • In a discussion about Romani culture, someone might ask, “Do modern-day Romani still use vardos?”
  • A travel enthusiast might say, “I would love to experience life on the road in a vardo.”

12. Romani

Romani refers to the ethnic group that originated in northern India and migrated to various parts of the world. It is often used to describe the culture, language, and traditions of the Romani people.

  • For instance, “The Romani have a rich cultural heritage that spans centuries.”
  • In a conversation about diversity, someone might say, “The Romani are an important ethnic group with a unique history.”
  • An anthropologist might study the Romani and their contributions to society.

13. Gipsy

Gipsy is an informal term used to refer to a Romani person. It is important to note that this term can be considered derogatory or offensive by some, so it is best to use “Romani” or “Romany” instead.

  • For example, “He identified as a Gipsy and was proud of his Romani heritage.”
  • In a discussion about cultural sensitivity, someone might say, “It’s important to use the term Romani instead of Gipsy.”
  • An advocate for Romani rights might argue, “Using the term Gipsy perpetuates stereotypes and marginalizes the Romani community.”

14. Romany

Romany refers to the language spoken by the Romani people. It is an Indo-Aryan language with various dialects and is an important part of Romani culture.

  • For instance, “She learned to speak Romany to connect with her Romani heritage.”
  • In a conversation about linguistic diversity, someone might say, “Romany is an endangered language that needs to be preserved.”
  • A linguist might study the grammatical structure and vocabulary of Romany.

15. Gitan

Gitan is a French term used to refer to a Romani person. It is derived from the Spanish word “gitano” and is often used in France and other French-speaking regions.

  • For example, “The Gitan community in France has faced discrimination and marginalization.”
  • In a discussion about cultural identity, someone might say, “Gitan is a term used by the French Romani to reclaim their heritage.”
  • A traveler might encounter the term Gitan while exploring Romani communities in France.

16. Zigeuner

This term is derived from the German word “Zigeuner” and is used to refer to the Roma people, a traditionally nomadic ethnic group. It can be considered a derogatory term and is often used in a discriminatory manner.

  • For example, “He used the term ‘Zigeuner’ to insult the Roma community.”
  • In a discussion about cultural diversity, someone might say, “The term ‘Zigeuner’ perpetuates negative stereotypes about the Roma.”
  • A person advocating for Roma rights might argue, “We should use more inclusive and respectful terminology when referring to the Zigeuner community.”

17. Kalderash

The Kalderash are a subgroup of the Roma people, known for their metalworking and craftsmanship skills. The term specifically refers to the Kalderash Roma, who have their own distinct language, customs, and traditions.

  • For instance, “The Kalderash community is known for their beautiful copperwork.”
  • In a discussion about Roma subgroups, someone might mention, “The Kalderash have a rich cultural heritage.”
  • A person studying Romani history might say, “The Kalderash are one of the oldest Romani subgroups, with a history dating back centuries.”

18. Sinti

The Sinti are a subgroup of the Roma people, primarily residing in Germany, Austria, and Italy. They have their own language, customs, and cultural traditions that set them apart from other Romani groups.

  • For example, “The Sinti community has faced discrimination and persecution throughout history.”
  • In a discussion about Romani subgroups, someone might mention, “The Sinti have a strong musical tradition.”
  • A person studying the Holocaust might say, “The Sinti were also targeted by the Nazis during World War II.”

19. Lovari

The Lovari are a subgroup of the Roma people, known for their itinerant lifestyle and expertise in horse trading. They have their own language, customs, and cultural traditions that differentiate them from other Romani groups.

  • For instance, “The Lovari community has a deep connection to horses and equestrian culture.”
  • In a discussion about Romani subgroups, someone might mention, “The Lovari are known for their vibrant and colorful clothing.”
  • A person studying Romani migration patterns might say, “The Lovari have a history of moving across different regions in search of trade opportunities.”

20. Manush

The term “Manush” is used by some Roma communities to refer to themselves as a collective group. It is a Romani word that translates to “people” in English. It signifies a sense of unity and shared identity among the Roma.

  • For example, “The Manush are a resilient and diverse community.”
  • In a discussion about Roma culture, someone might mention, “The Manush have a rich oral tradition passed down through generations.”
  • A person advocating for Roma rights might say, “We should respect the rights and dignity of the Manush community.”

21. Romanichal

Refers to a subgroup of Romani people who live in the United Kingdom. The term “Romanichal” is used to specifically identify this group of Gypsies.

  • For example, “The Romanichal Gypsies have a rich cultural heritage.”
  • In a discussion about Gypsy communities, someone might say, “Romanichal Gypsies have faced discrimination and marginalization.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I recently had the opportunity to meet some Romanichal Gypsies and learn about their traditions.”

22. Kale

This term is used to refer to the Black Gypsy community. “Kale” is a Romani word that means “black” and is used to specifically identify this group of Gypsies.

  • For instance, “The Kale Gypsies have a unique cultural identity.”
  • In a discussion about the diversity within the Gypsy community, someone might say, “It’s important to recognize the experiences and perspectives of Kale Gypsies.”
  • A person advocating for inclusivity might say, “Let’s celebrate the contributions of Kale Gypsies to our society.”

23. Boyash

Refers to a subgroup of Romani people who live in Central Europe. The term “Boyash” is used to specifically identify this group of Gypsies.

  • For example, “The Boyash Gypsies have a distinct language and cultural practices.”
  • In a discussion about Gypsy migration patterns, someone might say, “Boyash Gypsies have historically moved across different countries in Central Europe.”
  • A person sharing their travel experiences might say, “I had the opportunity to visit a Boyash Gypsy community and learn about their way of life.”

24. Lom

This term is used to refer to the Romani people as a whole. “Lom” is a Romani word that means “people” and is used to identify the broader community of Gypsies.

  • For instance, “The Lom have a rich and diverse cultural heritage.”
  • In a discussion about Gypsy history, someone might say, “The Lom have a long and complex history of migration and persecution.”
  • A person advocating for Gypsy rights might say, “It’s important to recognize the unique experiences and challenges faced by the Lom.”

25. Xoraxai

Refers to a subgroup of Romani people who live in Eastern Europe. The term “Xoraxai” is used to specifically identify this group of Gypsies.

  • For example, “The Xoraxai Gypsies have a distinct language and cultural traditions.”
  • In a discussion about Gypsy music, someone might say, “Xoraxai Gypsies are known for their vibrant and energetic musical performances.”
  • A person sharing their travels might say, “I had the opportunity to visit a Xoraxai Gypsy village and experience their hospitality and traditions.”

26. Gypsy

This term refers to a member of the Romani ethnic group, also known as Gypsies. It is important to note that the term “Gypsy” can be considered derogatory and offensive to some individuals, so it is recommended to use the term “Romani” instead.

  • For example, “She is a talented Romani artist.”
  • In a discussion about cultural diversity, one might say, “The Romani people have a rich and vibrant history.”
  • A person sharing their travel experiences might mention, “I had the opportunity to meet some Romani families during my trip to Eastern Europe.”

27. Pavee

This term is used to refer to the Irish Traveller community, which is a distinct ethnic group in Ireland. The term “Pavee” is derived from the Irish word “páipéar,” meaning “tinker” or “traveller.”

  • For instance, “He comes from a Pavee background.”
  • In a discussion about cultural identity, one might say, “The Pavee community has faced discrimination and marginalization.”
  • A person sharing their experiences with different cultures might mention, “I had the chance to learn about Pavee traditions and customs during my visit to Ireland.”

28. Mumper

This term is used to describe someone who begs for money or food. It can be considered derogatory and offensive, so it is important to use respectful language when discussing individuals who rely on begging as a means of survival.

  • For example, “She saw a mumper on the street and decided to give him some spare change.”
  • In a conversation about poverty and homelessness, one might say, “We need to address the root causes of mumping and provide support for those in need.”
  • A person discussing social inequality might argue, “We should work towards creating a society where no one has to resort to mumping for basic necessities.”

29. Gavver

This term is used in some Romani communities to refer to a police officer. It is important to note that the term “Gavver” is specific to certain dialects and may not be widely recognized or used outside of those communities.

  • For instance, “He had a run-in with a Gavver while he was walking through the neighborhood.”
  • In a discussion about law enforcement, one might say, “The relationship between the Romani community and Gavvers can be complex.”
  • A person sharing their personal experiences might mention, “I had the opportunity to speak with a Gavver about their work and challenges they face in maintaining community safety.”

30. Caló

This term refers to the language spoken by some Romani communities. Caló is a mixture of Romani and Spanish, and it has its own unique vocabulary and grammar.

  • For example, “She is fluent in Caló.”
  • In a discussion about language preservation, one might say, “Efforts are being made to teach Caló to younger generations.”
  • A person sharing their travel experiences might mention, “I had the chance to learn a few Caló phrases during my visit to a Romani community.”

31. Gadjo

This term is used to refer to someone who is not a member of the Gypsy community. It is often used by Gypsies to distinguish between themselves and outsiders.

  • For example, a Gypsy might say, “He’s a gadjo, he doesn’t understand our way of life.”
  • In a conversation about cultural traditions, someone might ask, “Do gadjo people celebrate the same holidays as Gypsies?”
  • A Gypsy might explain their perspective by saying, “From a gadjo’s point of view, our lifestyle might seem unconventional.”

32. Didikai

This term is used to refer to someone who is half Gypsy and half non-Gypsy. It is often used to describe individuals who have mixed heritage.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m a didikai – my mother is Gypsy and my father is not.”
  • In a discussion about cultural identity, someone might ask, “Do didikai people feel more connected to their Gypsy or non-Gypsy side?”
  • A didikai might share their personal experience by saying, “Growing up as a didikai, I had to navigate between two different cultures.”

33. Gorgio

This term is used to refer to someone who is not a member of the Gypsy community. It is often used in a derogatory manner and is considered offensive by many Gypsies.

  • For example, a Gypsy might say, “He’s a gorgio, he doesn’t understand our traditions.”
  • In a conversation about cultural stereotypes, someone might ask, “Why do Gypsies use the term gorgio to refer to non-Gypsies?”
  • A Gypsy might explain their perspective by saying, “Using the term gorgio is a way for us to assert our identity and separate ourselves from outsiders.”

34. Apple-knocker

This term is used to describe someone who is ignorant or uninformed. It is often used by Gypsies to refer to non-Gypsies who hold negative stereotypes or prejudices against them.

  • For instance, a Gypsy might say, “He’s just an apple-knocker who doesn’t understand our culture.”
  • In a discussion about discrimination, someone might ask, “Why do Gypsies use the term apple-knocker to describe non-Gypsies?”
  • A Gypsy might explain their perspective by saying, “We use the term apple-knocker to highlight the ignorance and prejudice that some non-Gypsies hold against us.”

35. Gaujo

This term is used to refer to someone who is not a member of the Gypsy community. It is often used by Gypsies to distinguish between themselves and outsiders.

  • For example, a Gypsy might say, “He’s a gaujo, he doesn’t understand our way of life.”
  • In a conversation about cultural traditions, someone might ask, “Do gaujo people celebrate the same holidays as Gypsies?”
  • A Gypsy might explain their perspective by saying, “From a gaujo’s point of view, our lifestyle might seem exotic or mysterious.”

36. Tink

This is a derogatory term used to refer to a Gypsy. It is considered offensive and disrespectful to use this term.

  • For example, “He used a racial slur and referred to the person as a tink.”
  • In a discussion about discrimination, someone might say, “We need to address the use of derogatory terms like tink.”
  • Another might argue, “Using slurs like that only perpetuates stereotypes and discrimination.”

37. Traveler

This term is often used to refer to the Gypsy community. It acknowledges their nomadic lifestyle and their rich cultural heritage.

  • For instance, “The Traveler community has a unique language and customs.”
  • In a discussion about cultural diversity, someone might say, “We should appreciate and respect the traditions of Travelers.”
  • Another might share, “I had the opportunity to learn about the Romani culture from a Traveler I met while traveling.”

38. Gitano

This is the Spanish word for Gypsy. It is commonly used in Spain and other Spanish-speaking countries.

  • For example, “In Spain, the Gitano community has contributed to the country’s music and dance.”
  • In a discussion about cultural assimilation, someone might say, “Many Gitano people face discrimination and challenges in integrating into society.”
  • Another might share, “I had the chance to experience Gitano music and dance during a trip to Spain.”

39. Zingaro

This is the Italian word for Gypsy. It is used to refer to the Romani people in Italy and other Italian-speaking regions.

  • For instance, “The Zingaro community in Italy has a rich cultural heritage.”
  • In a discussion about stereotypes, someone might say, “It’s important to challenge the negative stereotypes associated with Zingaro people.”
  • Another might argue, “Zingaro culture should be celebrated and respected for its contributions to Italian society.”

40. Cigano

This is the Portuguese word for Gypsy. It is used to refer to the Romani people in Portugal and other Portuguese-speaking countries.

  • For example, “The Cigano community in Portugal has faced discrimination and marginalization.”
  • In a discussion about cultural preservation, someone might say, “We should support initiatives that aim to preserve Cigano traditions and language.”
  • Another might share, “I had the opportunity to learn about Cigano music and dance during my trip to Brazil.”