Top 33 Slang For Heavy Rain – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to heavy rain, there’s more than just the pitter-patter of drops hitting the ground. From downpour to torrential showers, the English language has a plethora of slang words to describe this wet weather phenomenon. At Fluentslang, we’ve gathered the top slang terms for heavy rain that will make you rain-ready and have you impressing your friends with your weather lingo. So grab your umbrella and get ready to dive into this listicle!

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1. It’s raining cats and dogs

This phrase is used to describe a heavy downpour of rain. It implies that the rain is so intense that it feels like cats and dogs are falling from the sky.

  • For example, “I was planning to go for a walk, but then it started raining cats and dogs.”
  • A person might comment, “I can’t believe how hard it’s raining outside, it’s like it’s raining cats and dogs.”
  • Another person might say, “I got caught in a storm yesterday, it was raining cats and dogs the whole time.”

2. It’s a gully-washer

This phrase is used to describe a heavy rainstorm that produces a large amount of rainfall. It implies that the rain is so intense that it washes out gullies and can potentially cause flooding.

  • For instance, “We had a gully-washer last night, and now the streets are flooded.”
  • A person might say, “I hope we don’t have another gully-washer like last year, it caused so much damage.”
  • Another person might comment, “I love listening to the sound of rain during a gully-washer, it’s so soothing.”

3. It’s raining pitchforks

This phrase is used to describe a heavy rainstorm with large raindrops. It implies that the rain is so intense that it feels like pitchforks are falling from the sky.

  • For example, “I forgot my umbrella and got caught in a storm, it was raining pitchforks.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe how hard it’s raining right now, it’s like it’s raining pitchforks.”
  • Another person might comment, “I love the sound of rain during a pitchfork rain, it’s so calming.”

4. It’s bucketing down

This phrase is used to describe heavy rain that is falling with a lot of force. It implies that the rain is so intense that it feels like buckets of water are being poured from the sky.

  • For instance, “I got soaked on my way to work because it was bucketing down.”
  • A person might comment, “I can’t go out in this weather, it’s bucketing down outside.”
  • Another person might say, “I love staying indoors and listening to the sound of rain when it’s bucketing down.”

5. The Devil is bowling

This phrase is used in a lighthearted manner to describe heavy rain. It implies that the sound of the rain is so loud that it resembles the noise of a bowling game played by the Devil.

  • For example, “I woke up to the sound of the Devil bowling outside, it’s pouring.”
  • A person might comment, “I can’t sleep with the Devil bowling all night, the rain is so loud.”
  • Another person might say, “I love the sound of the Devil bowling, it’s so relaxing.”

6. Deluge

A deluge refers to a sudden and heavy downpour of rain. It is often used to describe a torrential rainstorm or a heavy rain that lasts for an extended period of time.

  • For example, “We were caught in a deluge on our hike and had to seek shelter.”
  • A person might say, “The deluge flooded the streets and caused traffic chaos.”
  • Another might comment, “I love the sound of the deluge hitting the roof at night.”

7. Torrential rain

Torrential rain refers to a heavy and intense downpour of rain. It is characterized by a large volume of water falling from the sky in a short period of time.

  • For instance, “The torrential rain caused flash floods in the city.”
  • A person might say, “I got completely soaked in the torrential rain.”
  • Another might comment, “The torrential rain made driving conditions extremely dangerous.”

8. Monsoon

A monsoon is a seasonal wind that brings heavy rain to a particular region. It is commonly associated with the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, and other parts of the world.

  • For example, “The monsoon season in India brings heavy rain and provides relief from the summer heat.”
  • A person might say, “I love the smell of the earth after a monsoon shower.”
  • Another might comment, “The monsoon rains can cause landslides and disrupt transportation.”

9. Cloudburst

A cloudburst refers to a sudden and intense rainfall that lasts for a short period of time. It is often characterized by a rapid and heavy downpour from a cloud.

  • For instance, “We were caught in a cloudburst while hiking and had to take cover.”
  • A person might say, “The cloudburst flooded the streets within minutes.”
  • Another might comment, “The cloudburst created a beautiful rainbow in the sky.”

10. Soaker

A soaker refers to a heavy rainstorm that drenches everything in its path. It is often used to describe a rainstorm that lasts for a considerable amount of time and results in significant water accumulation.

  • For example, “I forgot my umbrella and got completely soaked in the soaker.”
  • A person might say, “The soaker caused flooding in low-lying areas.”
  • Another might comment, “The soaker made it impossible to go outside without getting wet.”

11. Raining like a cow peeing on a flat rock

This phrase is used to describe a very heavy and intense rainstorm. It conveys the idea of rain coming down with great force and intensity.

  • For example, “When I left work, it was raining like a cow peeing on a flat rock. I got soaked within seconds.”
  • During a heavy rainstorm, someone might say, “It’s really coming down out there. It’s raining like a cow peeing on a flat rock.”
  • In a conversation about extreme weather, one might comment, “I’ve experienced heavy rain before, but nothing like a cow peeing on a flat rock.”

12. Raining buckets

This phrase is used to describe a heavy rainstorm where the rain is falling in large quantities and with great intensity. It conveys the image of rain falling as if someone is pouring buckets of water from the sky.

  • For instance, “I forgot my umbrella and got caught in the rain. It was pouring rain, like buckets being dumped on me.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t go outside right now. It’s raining buckets.”
  • During a heavy rainstorm, someone might comment, “Look at that! It’s raining buckets out there.”

13. Raining cats, dogs, and elephants

This phrase is used to describe a very heavy and intense rainstorm. It conveys the idea of rain falling with great force and in large quantities, as if animals and even elephants are falling from the sky.

  • For example, “I was driving when it started raining cats, dogs, and elephants. I could hardly see the road.”
  • During a heavy rainstorm, someone might say, “I can’t believe how much it’s raining. It’s like cats, dogs, and elephants are falling from the sky.”
  • In a conversation about extreme weather, one might comment, “I’ve experienced heavy rain before, but nothing like cats, dogs, and elephants.”

14. Raining like there’s no tomorrow

This phrase is used to describe a heavy rainstorm where the rain is falling with great intensity and without any signs of stopping. It conveys the idea of rain coming down as if there will be no end.

  • For instance, “I forgot my umbrella and got caught in the rain. It was raining like there’s no tomorrow.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe how hard it’s raining. It’s like there’s no tomorrow.”
  • During a heavy rainstorm, someone might comment, “I’ve never seen rain like this before. It’s raining like there’s no tomorrow.”

15. Rain cats and dogs

This phrase is used to describe a heavy rainstorm where the rain is falling with great intensity and in large quantities. It conveys the image of rain falling as if cats and dogs are falling from the sky.

  • For example, “I was walking my dog when it started to rain cats and dogs. We both got soaked.”
  • During a heavy rainstorm, someone might say, “I can’t believe how much it’s raining. It’s raining cats and dogs out there.”
  • In a conversation about extreme weather, one might comment, “I’ve experienced heavy rain before, but nothing like rain cats and dogs.”

16. Pouring down

This phrase is used to describe a situation where there is an intense and continuous heavy rain.

  • For example, “It was pouring down all day, and I got completely soaked.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t go out in this weather, it’s pouring down!”
  • Another person might comment, “The roads are flooded because it’s been pouring down for hours.”

17. Washout

This term is used to describe a situation where heavy rain causes flooding or washes away something, such as outdoor plans or events.

  • For instance, “The picnic got canceled because of the washout.”
  • Someone might say, “I had to change my plans because of the washout.”
  • Another person might comment, “The roads are closed due to the washout caused by the heavy rain.”

18. Squall

This word refers to a sudden and intense burst of wind accompanied by heavy rain. It is often used to describe a brief but powerful storm.

  • For example, “We were caught in a squall while sailing, and it was quite scary.”
  • Someone might say, “I had to take cover because of the squall that came out of nowhere.”
  • Another person might comment, “The outdoor concert got interrupted by a squall, and everyone had to seek shelter.”

19. Raining like a cow pissing on a flat rock

This phrase is a humorous and exaggerated way of describing a very heavy rain. It implies that the rain is coming down forcefully and in large quantities.

  • For instance, “I had to run to my car because it was raining like a cow pissing on a flat rock.”
  • Someone might say, “I’ve never seen it rain so hard before, it was like a cow peeing on a rock.”
  • Another person might comment, “Bring an umbrella, it’s raining like a cow pissing on a flat rock out there.”

20. Raining like a cow peeing on a rock

This phrase is another humorous way of describing heavy rain. It suggests that the rain is falling heavily and forcefully, similar to how a cow might pee on a rock.

  • For example, “I had to find shelter because it was raining like a cow peeing on a rock.”
  • Someone might say, “The rain is coming down like a cow peeing on a rock, we should stay indoors.”
  • Another person might comment, “I’m not going outside without an umbrella, it’s raining like a cow peeing on a rock.”

21. Raining like a cow peeing on a tin shed roof

This phrase is used to describe a very intense and heavy rainstorm. It implies that the rain is coming down in large quantities and with great force.

  • For example, “When I woke up this morning, it was raining like a cow peeing on a tin shed roof.”
  • During a conversation about the weather, someone might say, “I hope it doesn’t start raining like a cow peeing on a tin shed roof.”
  • A person describing a recent storm might say, “Last night, it was raining like a cow peeing on a tin shed roof for hours.”

22. Raining like a cow peeing on a tin barn roof

This expression is used to describe an extremely heavy and intense rainfall. It suggests that the rain is falling heavily and with great force, similar to the force with which a cow might urinate.

  • For instance, “I was walking home when it started raining like a cow peeing on a tin barn roof.”
  • During a discussion about the weather, someone might comment, “I can’t believe how hard it’s raining. It’s like a cow peeing on a tin barn roof.”
  • A person describing a recent storm might say, “The rain was coming down like a cow peeing on a tin barn roof. It was insane.”

23. Raining like a cow peeing on a tin shed

This phrase is used to describe a heavy and continuous rainfall. It implies that the rain is falling steadily and with significant intensity.

  • For example, “I was caught outside when it started raining like a cow peeing on a tin shed.”
  • During a conversation about the weather, someone might say, “I hope it stops raining like a cow peeing on a tin shed soon.”
  • A person describing a recent storm might say, “Yesterday, it was raining like a cow peeing on a tin shed all day long. I couldn’t go out.”

24. Raining like a cow peeing on a tin barn

This expression is used to describe a heavy and intense rainfall. It suggests that the rain is falling with great force and in large quantities, similar to the force with which a cow might urinate.

  • For instance, “When I left work, it was already raining like a cow peeing on a tin barn.”
  • During a discussion about the weather, someone might comment, “I can’t believe how hard it’s raining. It’s like a cow peeing on a tin barn.”
  • A person describing a recent storm might say, “Last night, it was raining like a cow peeing on a tin barn. I got completely soaked.”

25. Raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed shed

This phrase is used to describe a substantial and intense rainstorm. It implies that the rain is falling with significant force and in large quantities.

  • For example, “I was driving home when it started raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed shed.”
  • During a conversation about the weather, someone might say, “I hope the heavy rainfall stops soon. It’s like a cow peeing on a tin roofed shed.”
  • A person describing a recent storm might say, “The heavy rainfall last night was like a cow peeing on a tin roofed shed. It caused a lot of flooding.”

26. Raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed barn

This phrase is used to describe heavy rain that is coming down with great intensity. The comparison to a cow peeing on a tin roofed barn emphasizes the loud and forceful nature of the rain.

  • For example, “It’s raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed barn out there, better grab an umbrella.”
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t even see two feet in front of me, it was raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed barn.”
  • Another might comment, “The storm was so intense, it felt like it was raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed barn.”

27. Raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed shack

This phrase is used to describe heavy rain that is falling with great force and intensity. The comparison to a cow peeing on a tin roofed shack highlights the loud and forceful nature of the rain.

  • For instance, “I can’t go outside, it’s raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed shack.”
  • A person might say, “The rain was coming down so hard, it felt like a cow peeing on a tin roofed shack.”
  • Another might comment, “I’ve never seen rain like this before, it’s like a cow peeing on a tin roofed shack.”

28. Raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed cabin

This phrase is used to describe a significant amount of rain falling with great intensity. The comparison to a cow peeing on a tin roofed cabin emphasizes the forceful and loud nature of the rain.

  • For example, “I can’t believe how hard it’s raining, it’s like a cow peeing on a tin roofed cabin.”
  • A person might say, “The rain was so heavy, it felt like a cow peeing on a tin roofed cabin.”
  • Another might comment, “I’ve never seen rain come down this hard, it’s like a cow peeing on a tin roofed cabin.”

29. Raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed house

This phrase is used to describe heavy rain that is falling with great force and intensity. The comparison to a cow peeing on a tin roofed house highlights the loud and forceful nature of the rain.

  • For instance, “I can’t go outside, it’s raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed house.”
  • A person might say, “The rain was coming down so hard, it felt like a cow peeing on a tin roofed house.”
  • Another might comment, “I’ve never seen rain like this before, it’s like a cow peeing on a tin roofed house.”

30. Raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed building

This phrase is used to describe heavy rain that is falling with great force and intensity. The comparison to a cow peeing on a tin roofed building emphasizes the loud and forceful nature of the rain.

  • For example, “I can’t believe how hard it’s raining, it’s like a cow peeing on a tin roofed building.”
  • A person might say, “The rain was so heavy, it felt like a cow peeing on a tin roofed building.”
  • Another might comment, “I’ve never seen rain come down this hard, it’s like a cow peeing on a tin roofed building.”

31. Raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed structure

This phrase is used to describe a very heavy rainstorm. It implies that the rain is falling in large quantities and with significant force.

  • For example, “It was raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed structure, so we had to cancel our outdoor plans.”
  • A person might say, “I got soaked because it was raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed structure and I didn’t have an umbrella.”
  • Someone might complain, “I hate when it’s raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed structure because it makes everything so wet and muddy.”

32. Raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed establishment

This expression is used to describe a torrential downpour. It suggests that the rain is falling intensely and with great force.

  • For instance, “We couldn’t go outside because it was raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed establishment.”
  • A person might comment, “I’ve never seen rain like this before. It’s coming down like a cow peeing on a tin roofed establishment.”
  • Someone might say, “I had to take cover because it was raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed establishment and I didn’t want to get soaked.”

33. Raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed facility

This phrase is used to describe a period of intense and continuous rain. It conveys the idea that the rain is falling heavily and persistently.

  • For example, “I couldn’t go out because it was raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed facility.”
  • A person might say, “The weather forecast said it would be raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed facility all day.”
  • Someone might complain, “I hate when it’s raining like a cow peeing on a tin roofed facility because it ruins my plans.”
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