Top 43 Slang For Help – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to asking for help, sometimes the right words can make all the difference. That’s why we’ve put together a list of the top slang phrases for help. Whether you’re navigating a new city or just need a hand with your latest DIY project, these trendy expressions will have you sounding like a pro in no time. So, buckle up and get ready to level up your communication skills with our handy guide!

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1. Bail

To “bail” means to leave or escape a situation, often one that is unpleasant or dangerous. It can also refer to providing financial assistance to someone, particularly in the context of getting them out of trouble with the law.

  • For example, “I need to bail on this party, it’s getting too rowdy.”
  • In a conversation about a friend’s legal trouble, someone might say, “I had to bail him out of jail.”
  • Another usage could be, “I’ll bail you out if things get too intense at the concert.”

2. Ditch

To “ditch” means to abandon or leave behind someone or something. It can also refer to getting rid of or disposing of something.

  • For instance, “I had to ditch my old car, it was falling apart.”
  • In a discussion about a failed plan, someone might say, “We had to ditch the original idea and come up with a new one.”
  • Another usage could be, “I ditched my toxic friend because they were bringing me down.”

3. Busted

To be “busted” means to be caught or discovered doing something wrong or illegal. It can also refer to something being broken or damaged.

  • For example, “He got busted for shoplifting at the mall.”
  • In a conversation about a broken phone, someone might say, “I dropped it and now the screen is busted.”
  • Another usage could be, “She was busted cheating on the test and failed as a result.”

4. Can I get you something?

This phrase is a polite way of offering assistance or help to someone, often in a service or hospitality context.

  • For instance, a waiter might ask a customer, “Can I get you something to drink?”
  • In a conversation with a guest, a host might say, “Can I get you something to eat?”
  • Another usage could be, “Can I get you something? You look like you could use a hand.”

5. Shall I help you with…?

This phrase is a polite way of offering assistance or help to someone, often in a more specific or task-oriented context.

  • For example, “Shall I help you with your bags?”
  • In a conversation about moving furniture, someone might say, “Shall I help you with that heavy couch?”
  • Another usage could be, “Shall I help you with the cooking? It looks like you have your hands full.”

6. Would you like to…?

This phrase is used to offer help or support to someone. It is a polite way to ask if the person needs any assistance.

  • For example, “Would you like me to help you carry those bags?”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “Would you like me to proofread your report?”
  • A friend might ask, “Would you like me to pick you up from the airport?”

7. Do you want me to have a look…?

This phrase is used to offer help or support by suggesting to take a look at something. It implies that the person is willing to inspect or examine something on behalf of the other person.

  • For instance, “Do you want me to have a look at your car? It seems to be making a strange noise.”
  • In a technical discussion, someone might ask, “Do you want me to have a look at your computer? I might be able to fix the issue.”
  • A colleague might offer, “Do you want me to have a look at your presentation? I can give you some feedback.”

8. I’d be glad to help

This phrase is used to express willingness and eagerness to provide assistance or support to someone. It conveys a positive attitude towards helping.

  • For example, “If you need any help with your project, I’d be glad to help.”
  • In a customer service scenario, a representative might say, “I’d be glad to help you with any questions or concerns you have.”
  • A friend might offer, “If you ever need someone to talk to, I’d be glad to help. You can always count on me.”

9. I’d be happy to assist

This phrase is used to express willingness and enthusiasm in helping someone. It conveys a positive and friendly attitude towards offering support or assistance.

  • For instance, “If you need any help with your move, I’d be happy to assist you.”
  • In a professional setting, someone might say, “I’d be happy to assist you with any administrative tasks you need help with.”
  • A neighbor might offer, “If you need any help with your garden, I’d be happy to assist. I enjoy gardening and would love to help.”

10. What can I do for you?

This phrase is used to ask someone how you can assist or help them. It is a general and open-ended question that allows the person to specify their needs.

  • For example, “What can I do for you? Do you need any help with your project?”
  • In a customer service interaction, a representative might ask, “What can I do for you today? How can I assist you?”
  • A friend might ask, “What can I do for you? Is there anything specific you need help with?”

11. I’d like to know what help can I be to you

This phrase is a polite way of offering assistance or asking how you can be of help to someone. It conveys a willingness to provide support or aid.

  • For example, if someone is struggling with a task, you might say, “I’d like to know what help can I be to you.”
  • In a customer service setting, a representative might ask, “How can I assist you with your issue today?”
  • A friend might offer, “If you need anything, just let me know. I’d like to know what help can I be to you.”

12. I am happy to be of service

This phrase expresses a willingness and eagerness to assist someone. It conveys a positive attitude and a desire to be of service.

  • For instance, if someone thanks you for your help, you might respond, “I am happy to be of service.”
  • In a professional setting, a colleague might say, “If you need any assistance, I’m here to help.”
  • A customer service representative might greet a customer with, “Welcome! I am happy to be of service.”

13. How can I help you?

This is a straightforward and direct way of offering assistance or asking how you can be of help to someone. It shows a willingness to provide support or aid.

  • For example, a salesperson might approach a customer and ask, “How can I help you today?”
  • In a personal setting, if someone seems troubled, you might ask, “What can I do for you? How can I help you?”
  • A friend might reach out and say, “I heard you were going through a tough time. How can I help you?”

14. Yes, please, I’d love to

This phrase expresses a willingness and enthusiasm to help someone. It conveys a positive attitude and a desire to be of service.

  • For instance, if someone asks for your assistance, you might respond, “Yes, please, I’d love to.”
  • In a professional setting, a colleague might say, “If you need any help, I’d be happy to assist.”
  • A friend might offer, “If you need a hand with anything, just let me know. I’d love to help.”

15. If you wouldn’t mind

This phrase is a polite way of asking someone for help or assistance. It acknowledges the possibility that the person may be busy or inconvenienced, but still expresses a request for their help.

  • For example, if you need someone to do you a favor, you might say, “If you wouldn’t mind, could you help me with this?”
  • In a work setting, if you need someone’s assistance, you might ask, “If you wouldn’t mind, could you lend me a hand with this task?”
  • A friend might ask, “If you wouldn’t mind, could you help me move this weekend?”

16. Accept

When someone asks for assistance and you agree to provide it. This can be used in various situations.

  • For example, if a friend asks, “Can you help me move this weekend?” and you say, “Sure, I can accept that.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might ask, “Can you accept this task?” and you can respond with, “Yes, I accept.”
  • If someone is in need of support and they reach out, you can say, “I accept your request for help.”

17. Decline

When someone asks for assistance and you politely decline to provide it. This can be used in different scenarios.

  • For instance, if a friend asks, “Can you help me with my homework?” and you reply, “Sorry, I have to decline.”
  • In a professional setting, a coworker might ask, “Can you take on this project?” and you can say, “I have too much on my plate, so I must decline.”
  • If someone asks for your assistance but you are unable to help, you can kindly decline their request.
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18. Thank somebody

When someone has provided assistance and you want to show appreciation for their help. This is a way to acknowledge their support.

  • For example, if a friend helps you move and you want to express gratitude, you can say, “I want to thank you for your help.”
  • In a work setting, if a colleague goes out of their way to assist you, you can say, “I just wanted to thank you for your help with the project.”
  • If someone provides guidance or support during a difficult time, you can sincerely thank them for their help.

19. SOS

A distress signal used to indicate a life-threatening situation or request for immediate assistance. It is commonly used in emergency situations.

  • For instance, if someone is stranded on a deserted island and needs help, they might use SOS as a distress signal.
  • In maritime settings, if a ship is sinking or in danger, they might send out an SOS signal to alert nearby vessels.
  • In extreme outdoor adventures, someone might carry an SOS beacon to call for help in case of an emergency.

20. Mayday

A call for help used primarily by pilots and air traffic controllers to indicate a life-threatening emergency. It is recognized as a distress signal worldwide.

  • For example, if a pilot experiences engine failure and is in immediate danger, they will transmit a mayday call to air traffic control.
  • In aviation, if a plane is hijacked or faces any other critical situation, the pilot will use the mayday signal to request assistance.
  • Mayday is a universally understood distress signal that signifies the need for urgent help.

21. 10-4

This phrase is used to indicate understanding or agreement. It originated from the ten-code system used by law enforcement and other emergency services to communicate quickly and efficiently over radio.

  • For example, a police officer might say, “10-4, I’m on my way” in response to a dispatch.
  • A truck driver might use it to confirm they received instructions, saying, “10-4, I’ll make that delivery.”
  • In casual conversation, someone might use it to show agreement, like saying, “10-4, let’s meet at 6 pm.”

22. Code Red

This phrase is often used to describe a situation that requires immediate attention or action. It originated from the use of color codes to categorize different types of emergencies in hospitals and other facilities.

  • For instance, a firefighter might yell “Code Red!” to alert their team of a dangerous fire.
  • In a workplace, a manager might announce a “Code Red” to address a critical issue.
  • In military contexts, it can refer to a high-level security threat or imminent danger.
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23. Lend a hand

This phrase is used to express a willingness to help or provide assistance to someone in need. It implies a willingness to contribute one’s time, effort, or resources.

  • For example, a coworker might say, “I can lend a hand with that project if you need.”
  • In a community service context, a volunteer might ask, “How can I lend a hand?”
  • A friend might offer, “If you ever need help moving, just let me know. I’m happy to lend a hand.”

24. Give a hand

Similar to “lend a hand,” this phrase is used to express a willingness to help or provide assistance to someone in need. It emphasizes the act of giving, rather than lending, support.

  • For instance, a teacher might ask their students to “give a hand” to a classmate struggling with a task.
  • In a sports setting, a coach might encourage their team to “give a hand” to a teammate who made a mistake.
  • A parent might ask their child to “give a hand” with household chores.

25. Lend me your ears

This phrase is a figurative way of asking someone to pay attention and listen carefully. It originated from Shakespeare’s play “Julius Caesar,” where the character Mark Antony addresses a crowd and says, “Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.”

  • For example, a speaker might begin their presentation by saying, “Ladies and gentlemen, please lend me your ears.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I have an important announcement to make. Can you lend me your ears for a moment?”
  • A teacher might use it to capture their students’ attention, saying, “Class, lend me your ears. We have an exciting field trip coming up.”

26. Give me a hand

This phrase is used to ask someone to help or support you in a task or situation.

  • For example, if you’re struggling to carry a heavy box, you might say, “Can you give me a hand with this?”
  • In a group project, you might ask a team member, “Can you give me a hand with the research?”
  • If you need help moving furniture, you could say, “I could really use a hand with this couch.”

27. Lend a helping hand

This phrase is used to encourage someone to offer their assistance or support to others.

  • For instance, if you see someone struggling with a heavy load, you might say, “Why don’t you lend a helping hand?”
  • In a community service project, a leader might encourage volunteers to “lend a helping hand to those in need.”
  • If a friend is going through a difficult time, you might tell them, “I’m here for you. I’m ready to lend a helping hand.”

28. Be a lifesaver

This phrase is used to describe someone who provides crucial help or support in a difficult or dangerous situation.

  • For example, if someone rescues you from drowning, you might say, “You’re a lifesaver!”
  • In a medical emergency, a doctor or paramedic might be called a “lifesaver” for saving someone’s life.
  • If a friend helps you with a last-minute deadline, you could say, “Thank you so much! You’re a lifesaver.”

29. Be a good Samaritan

This phrase refers to someone who selflessly helps someone they don’t know, often in a situation where immediate assistance is needed.

  • For instance, if you witness a car accident and stop to help the injured, you would be considered a “good Samaritan.”
  • In a community, a person who volunteers their time and resources to help others might be called a “good Samaritan.”
  • If someone helps a lost tourist find their way, you could say, “That person is a true good Samaritan.”

30. Be a shoulder to lean on

This phrase is used to describe someone who offers comfort and emotional support to another person in times of need or distress.

  • For example, if a friend is going through a breakup, you might say, “I’m here for you. I can be a shoulder to lean on.”
  • In a support group, members are encouraged to be shoulders to lean on for each other.
  • If someone is dealing with a loss, you could offer, “I’m here to listen. I can be a shoulder to lean on.”

31. Be a shoulder to cry on

This phrase means to be there for someone who needs to express their emotions and seek comfort. It implies being a compassionate listener and providing a safe space for the person to share their feelings.

  • For example, “After her breakup, Sarah needed someone to be a shoulder to cry on.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll always be here for you, ready to be a shoulder to cry on.”
  • In a difficult situation, someone might ask, “Can I count on you to be a shoulder to cry on?”

32. Be a confidant

Being a confidant means being someone whom another person trusts and can confide in. It implies keeping the shared information private and offering support or advice if needed.

  • For instance, “She knew she could trust him to be her confidant and keep her secrets safe.”
  • A friend might say, “You can always count on me to be your confidant, no matter what.”
  • When someone needs to vent, they might ask, “Can I talk to you? I need a confidant right now.”

33. Bail me out

This phrase is often used figuratively to mean rescuing someone from a difficult or problematic situation, especially when it involves money or legal matters. It implies providing the necessary support to help someone out of trouble.

  • For example, “He asked his friend to bail him out of debt by lending him some money.”
  • In a tight spot, someone might say, “I really need you to bail me out of this mess.”
  • When a person needs help with a legal issue, they might ask, “Can you recommend a lawyer who can bail me out?”

34. Come to the rescue

This phrase means to provide assistance or support in a time of need or emergency. It implies saving someone from a difficult or dangerous situation.

  • For instance, “The firefighters came to the rescue and saved the family from the burning building.”
  • A friend might say, “Whenever you’re in trouble, I’ll be there to come to the rescue.”
  • In a challenging situation, someone might ask, “Can you please come to the rescue? I don’t know what to do.”

35. Save the day

This phrase refers to someone or something that prevents a disaster or resolves a difficult situation just in time. It implies being the hero or savior in a particular scenario.

  • For example, “His quick thinking and actions saved the day during the crisis.”
  • A friend might say, “You really saved the day with your brilliant idea.”
  • When someone needs urgent help, they might exclaim, “Please, someone, save the day!”

36. Pitch in

This phrase means to contribute or help out with a task or project. It implies that everyone is working together to achieve a common goal.

  • For example, “Can you pitch in and help clean up after the party?”
  • In a group project, someone might say, “Let’s all pitch in and finish this assignment on time.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Can you pitch in and cover my shift tomorrow?”

37. Be there for

To be there for someone means to offer support, comfort, or assistance in times of need or difficulty.

  • For instance, “I know you’re going through a tough time, but I want you to know that I’ll always be there for you.”
  • A friend might say, “If you ever need someone to talk to, I’ll be there for you.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might advise, “It’s important to be there for your partner during both the good times and the bad.”

38. Give a helping hand

This phrase means to offer assistance or support to someone who needs it. It implies lending a hand to make a task or situation easier for another person.

  • For example, “I saw my neighbor struggling to carry groceries, so I gave her a helping hand.”
  • In a volunteer context, someone might say, “I love giving a helping hand at the local homeless shelter.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Can you give me a helping hand with this project?”

39. Lend a helping ear

To lend a helping ear means to offer a listening ear to someone who needs to talk or express themselves. It implies being there to listen and provide emotional support.

  • For instance, “Thank you for lending a helping ear. It feels good to talk about my problems.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m here to lend a helping ear anytime you need to vent.”
  • In a support group, someone might offer, “We’re all here to lend a helping ear and offer advice.”

40. Offer a shoulder to lean on

To offer a shoulder to lean on means to provide emotional support and comfort to someone who is going through a difficult time. It implies being a source of strength and stability for another person.

  • For example, “I know you’re going through a breakup. If you need someone to talk to, I’m here to offer a shoulder to lean on.”
  • A friend might say, “You can always count on me to offer a shoulder to lean on when you’re feeling down.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “A true friend is always there to offer a shoulder to lean on.”

41. Be a source of inspiration

To be a source of inspiration means to motivate and inspire others through one’s actions, words, or accomplishments. It is about being a role model and encouraging others to pursue their goals and dreams.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I strive to be a source of inspiration for my students, so they believe in their potential.”
  • A motivational speaker might share, “My goal is to be a source of inspiration for anyone who feels stuck or unmotivated.”
  • A friend might say, “You’ve always been a source of inspiration to me with your determination and perseverance.”

42. Be a positive influence

To be a positive influence means to have a positive impact on others’ lives. It involves being a role model, supporting and encouraging others, and promoting positive behaviors and attitudes.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “I want to be a positive influence on my children, teaching them kindness and empathy.”
  • A mentor might share, “My goal is to be a positive influence on my mentees, helping them develop their skills and confidence.”
  • A coworker might say, “You’re always a positive influence in the office, bringing energy and optimism to the team.”

43. Be a guiding hand

To be a guiding hand means to offer guidance and support to someone who needs assistance. It involves providing advice, direction, and help to navigate challenges or make important decisions.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I see myself as a guiding hand for my students, helping them explore their interests and choose their career paths.”
  • A coach might share, “As a guiding hand, my role is to provide athletes with the tools and strategies they need to succeed.”
  • A friend might say, “Thank you for being a guiding hand during my difficult times. Your advice and support mean the world to me.”