Top 20 Slang For Homeless Person – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to discussing the topic of slang for homeless person, there’s a whole new world of words and phrases that might surprise you. Our team at Fluentslang has delved deep into this lesser-known lexicon to bring you a curated list of terms that shed light on this often overlooked aspect of our language. Get ready to expand your vocabulary and gain a new perspective on the language we use every day.

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1. Hobo

A hobo is a person who wanders from place to place, often without a permanent home or job. They are typically associated with a transient lifestyle and may rely on odd jobs or begging for survival.

  • For example, “The hobo hopped on a train and traveled to the next town.”
  • In a conversation about homelessness, someone might say, “Many hobos face challenges finding stable housing.”
  • A person discussing social issues might argue, “We need to address the root causes of hoboism to combat homelessness.”

2. Vagabond

A vagabond is someone who roams or travels from place to place without a settled home. They often live a nomadic lifestyle and may rely on temporary work or support from others.

  • For instance, “The vagabond hitchhiked across the country, exploring new places.”
  • In a discussion about alternative lifestyles, one might say, “Some people choose to become vagabonds to experience freedom and adventure.”
  • A person advocating for travel might argue, “Being a vagabond allows you to immerse yourself in different cultures and gain a broader perspective.”

3. Tramp

A tramp is a person who lives a transient lifestyle, often moving from place to place and relying on temporary shelter. They may engage in begging or casual labor to meet their basic needs.

  • For example, “The tramp slept in a park and relied on food donations from kind strangers.”
  • In a conversation about poverty, someone might say, “Many tramps face difficulties accessing healthcare and social services.”
  • A person discussing homelessness might argue, “We need to provide more support and resources for tramps to help them reintegrate into society.”

4. Bum

A bum is a derogatory term used to describe a person who avoids work and relies on others for support. It is often associated with someone who is homeless or unwilling to contribute to society.

  • For instance, “The bum spent his days panhandling instead of looking for a job.”
  • In a discussion about social welfare, one might say, “There is a misconception that all homeless individuals are bums.”
  • A person expressing frustration with laziness might exclaim, “Get off your bum and start being productive!”

5. Bag lady

A bag lady is a term used to refer to a homeless woman who carries her belongings in bags or other makeshift containers. It is often used to describe someone who is visibly homeless and may struggle with mental health issues.

  • For example, “The bag lady searched through trash bins for discarded items.”
  • In a conversation about poverty and mental health, someone might say, “Many bag ladies face additional challenges due to the stigma surrounding homelessness.”
  • A person discussing social inequality might argue, “We need to address the underlying issues that lead to someone becoming a bag lady.”

6. Homeless individual

This term refers to someone who does not have a stable place to live and is often used to describe individuals who live on the streets or in temporary shelters.

  • For example, “The city is working to provide support and resources for homeless individuals.”
  • A news article might discuss, “The increasing number of homeless individuals in urban areas.”
  • In a conversation about social issues, someone might say, “We need to address the root causes of homelessness to help homeless individuals find stability.”

7. Rough sleeper

This slang term is used to describe individuals who sleep in public areas, such as parks, sidewalks, or doorways, due to a lack of permanent housing.

  • For instance, “The city implemented measures to provide assistance to rough sleepers during the winter.”
  • A news headline might read, “Concerns raised over the safety of rough sleepers in the city.”
  • In a discussion about homelessness, someone might say, “We should focus on providing shelter and support for rough sleepers.”

8. Houseless

This term is often used as an alternative to “homeless” and emphasizes the lack of a physical house or dwelling.

  • For example, “The organization aims to provide housing solutions for houseless individuals.”
  • A community initiative might be called, “Project Houseless: Providing Support and Resources.”
  • In a conversation about housing insecurity, someone might say, “We need to address the systemic issues that lead to houselessness.”

9. Roofless

This slang term highlights the absence of a roof, indicating that the person does not have a secure or permanent shelter.

  • For instance, “The outreach program focuses on providing assistance to roofless individuals.”
  • A news report might discuss, “The challenges faced by roofless individuals during extreme weather conditions.”
  • In a conversation about homelessness, someone might say, “We need to find solutions to ensure that no one is left roofless.”

10. Urban nomad

This term romanticizes the experience of homelessness by likening it to a nomadic lifestyle. It suggests that the person moves from place to place within urban areas.

  • For example, “Some urban nomads prefer the freedom and flexibility of their transient lifestyle.”
  • A travel blog might feature an article titled, “Exploring the city as an urban nomad.”
  • In a discussion about homelessness, someone might say, “We should provide support for urban nomads while working towards long-term housing solutions.”

11. Outcast

An outcast refers to a person who is socially excluded or marginalized from mainstream society. It is often used to describe someone who is homeless and does not fit into societal norms.

  • For example, “He became an outcast after losing his job and home.”
  • In a discussion about homelessness, one might say, “We need to address the issue of outcasts in our community.”
  • A person advocating for social justice might argue, “We should not stigmatize outcasts, but instead provide them with support and resources.”

12. Shelterless person

A shelterless person is someone who does not have a place to live or lacks permanent housing. It is a term commonly used to describe someone who is homeless.

  • For instance, “The city needs to provide more resources for shelterless individuals.”
  • In a conversation about affordable housing, one might say, “We must find solutions for the increasing number of shelterless people.”
  • A person discussing homelessness might argue, “No one should be a shelterless person in a society as wealthy as ours.”

13. Sidewalk dweller

A sidewalk dweller is a person who lives or sleeps on the sidewalk, often due to homelessness or lack of alternative housing options. This term highlights the physical location where the person resides.

  • For example, “The city has seen an increase in sidewalk dwellers in recent years.”
  • In a discussion about public spaces, one might say, “We need to find a balance between the needs of sidewalk dwellers and the general public.”
  • A person advocating for affordable housing might argue, “No one should be forced to become a sidewalk dweller due to high housing costs.”

14. Urban wanderer

An urban wanderer is a person who roams or wanders in urban areas, often without a permanent home. It is a term used to describe someone who is homeless and spends their time in urban environments.

  • For instance, “The city streets are filled with urban wanderers.”
  • In a conversation about city planning, one might say, “We need to consider the needs of urban wanderers in our urban development.”
  • A person discussing homelessness might argue, “We should provide support and resources for urban wanderers to help them transition out of homelessness.”

15. Beggar

A beggar is a person who asks for money or goods from others, often due to being homeless or in need. While not all homeless people are beggars and not all beggars are homeless, the term is sometimes used to refer to someone who is both homeless and asks for assistance.

  • For example, “The beggar on the street corner asked for spare change.”
  • In a discussion about poverty, one might say, “We need to address the root causes of begging and provide support for those in need.”
  • A person advocating for social welfare might argue, “We should not stigmatize beggars, but instead offer them resources and opportunities to improve their situation.”

16. Vagrant

Vagrant is a term used to describe a person who is without a permanent home or a regular source of income. It is often used to refer to someone who wanders from place to place and relies on temporary shelter.

  • For example, “The city has seen an increase in the number of vagrants living in parks and alleyways.”
  • A news article might report, “Local organizations are working to provide support and resources for vagrants in the community.”
  • In a conversation about homelessness, someone might say, “We need to address the root causes that lead to people becoming vagrants.”

17. Person experiencing homelessness

This term is used to describe someone who does not have a fixed place to live and is experiencing homelessness. It emphasizes the temporary and transitional nature of their housing situation.

  • For instance, “We should focus on providing assistance and support to individuals experiencing homelessness.”
  • In a discussion about homelessness policies, someone might argue, “We need to prioritize the needs of people who are experiencing homelessness.”
  • A social worker might say, “Our goal is to help individuals experiencing homelessness find stable housing and rebuild their lives.”

18. Roughneck

A roughneck is a slang term used to describe a person who lives on the streets and lacks a permanent home. It often carries connotations of a rugged or tough lifestyle.

  • For example, “The city’s roughneck population has been growing due to economic challenges.”
  • In a conversation about urban poverty, someone might say, “We need to address the issues that lead to people becoming roughnecks.”
  • A journalist might write, “The roughnecks of the city face daily challenges and struggles to survive.”

19. Knockabout

Knockabout is a term used to describe a person who leads a transient or nomadic lifestyle, often without a permanent home. It implies a sense of constant movement and lack of stability.

  • For instance, “The knockabouts of the city can be found in various neighborhoods, constantly on the move.”
  • In a discussion about homelessness, someone might argue, “We should provide resources and support for the knockabouts in our community.”
  • A social worker might say, “The knockabouts face unique challenges due to their transient lifestyle.”

20. Rover

A rover is a slang term used to describe a person who wanders or roams from place to place without a fixed residence. It conveys a sense of restlessness and a lack of permanent ties.

  • For example, “The city’s rovers often rely on shelters and temporary housing options.”
  • In a conversation about homelessness, someone might say, “We need to provide support and resources for the rovers in our community.”
  • A community outreach worker might say, “Our goal is to connect with the rovers and offer them assistance in finding stable housing.”
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