Top 29 Slang For Hopeless – Meaning & Usage

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1. Screwed

This slang term is used to describe a situation or condition that is beyond repair or salvage. It often implies that there is no way to fix or improve the situation.

  • For example, “I missed my flight and now I’m screwed.”
  • In a difficult situation, someone might say, “We’re really screwed now.”
  • A person discussing a failed project might say, “The whole thing is screwed, we need to start over.”

2. Kaput

This slang term is used to describe something that is completely broken, useless, or beyond repair. It is often used when referring to objects or systems that no longer work as intended.

  • For instance, “My car broke down and now it’s kaput.”
  • In a discussion about a malfunctioning computer, someone might say, “It’s kaput, I need to get a new one.”
  • A person talking about a failed relationship might say, “Our marriage is kaput, there’s no going back.”

3. Lost cause

This slang term is used to describe a situation or person that is considered to be hopeless or beyond any chance of success. It implies that all efforts or attempts to improve the situation are futile.

  • For example, “Trying to convince him to change his mind is a lost cause.”
  • In a discussion about a failing business, someone might say, “It’s a lost cause, we should cut our losses.”
  • A person talking about a friend who refuses to seek help might say, “I’ve tried to help her, but she’s a lost cause.”

4. Dead-end

This slang term is used to describe a situation or path that offers no hope of progress, success, or advancement. It implies that there is no way to move forward or achieve any desired outcome.

  • For instance, “I’ve been applying for jobs, but they all seem like dead-ends.”
  • In a discussion about a failed project, someone might say, “We’ve reached a dead-end, there’s no solution.”
  • A person talking about a relationship that is going nowhere might say, “It’s a dead-end, we should break up.”

5. FUBAR

This slang term stands for “F**ked Up Beyond All Recognition” and is used to describe something that is completely messed up, ruined, or beyond repair. It is often used to emphasize the severity or hopelessness of a situation.

  • For example, “The whole situation is FUBAR, there’s no fixing it.”
  • In a discussion about a disastrous event, someone might say, “Everything went FUBAR.”
  • A person talking about a failed plan might say, “It’s FUBAR, we need to come up with a new strategy.”

6. Toast

When something is described as “toast,” it means that it is beyond repair or ruined. This slang term is often used to convey a sense of hopelessness or finality.

  • For example, if a car breaks down and cannot be fixed, someone might say, “Well, that car is toast.”
  • If a person fails an important exam and has no chance of passing, they might say, “I’m toast for this class.”
  • In a video game, if a player’s character is defeated and cannot be revived, they might say, “I’m toast. Game over.”

7. Beyond repair

When something is described as “beyond repair,” it means that it is in such a state of disrepair or damage that it cannot be fixed or restored to its original condition.

  • For instance, if a piece of furniture is broken into many pieces, it might be described as “beyond repair.”
  • If a relationship is irreparably damaged and cannot be repaired, someone might say, “Our friendship is beyond repair.”
  • In a discussion about a car accident, if a vehicle is completely totaled and cannot be salvaged, it might be referred to as “beyond repair.”

8. No way out

When someone is in a situation where there is “no way out,” it means that they are trapped or have no escape or solution available to them.

  • For example, if a person is deeply in debt and cannot find a way to repay it, they might feel like there is “no way out.”
  • If a character in a movie is surrounded by enemies and has no means of escape, they might say, “There’s no way out of this.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult decision, someone might say, “I feel like I’m stuck with no way out.”

9. Down and out

When someone is described as “down and out,” it means that they are in a state of complete defeat, despair, or hopelessness.

  • For instance, if a person loses their job, their home, and has no support system, they might be considered “down and out.”
  • If a team loses every game in a season and has no chance of making the playoffs, they might be described as “down and out.”
  • In a discussion about a person’s mental health, if they are feeling hopeless and lost, they might say, “I’m really down and out right now.”

10. In a pickle

When someone is “in a pickle,” it means that they are in a difficult or challenging situation, often with no easy solution or way out.

  • For example, if a person is running late for an important meeting and their car breaks down, they might say, “I’m in a pickle.”
  • If a character in a book is caught in a compromising situation and has to come up with a creative solution, they might be “in a pickle.”
  • In a discussion about a person’s financial troubles, someone might say, “They’ve really gotten themselves in a pickle with all that debt.”

11. Up the creek without a paddle

This phrase is used to describe being in a difficult or hopeless situation with no means of escape or solution. It originated from the literal idea of being stranded in a canoe without a paddle, making it impossible to navigate or move forward.

  • For example, if someone loses their job and has no savings or other prospects, they might say, “I’m up the creek without a paddle.”
  • In a challenging project with no resources or support, someone might exclaim, “We’re up the creek without a paddle!”
  • A person facing a series of unfortunate events might sigh, “Looks like I’m up the creek without a paddle again.”

12. Out of luck

This phrase is used to describe a situation where someone has no chance or opportunity for success or good fortune. It implies that luck or favorable circumstances are not on their side.

  • For instance, if someone buys a lottery ticket but doesn’t win, they might say, “I guess I’m out of luck.”
  • If a person is hoping for a promotion but someone else gets the position, they might feel disappointed and think, “I’m out of luck.”
  • In a difficult situation where all options have been exhausted, someone might resign themselves to their fate and say, “Looks like I’m out of luck.”

13. D.O.A.

This acronym stands for “Dead on Arrival” and is often used to describe a situation or event that is completely hopeless or doomed from the start. It originated from the medical term used to describe a patient who is deceased upon arrival at a hospital or medical facility.

  • For example, if a person’s business venture fails before it even begins, they might say, “It was D.O.A.”
  • In a discussion about a failed relationship, someone might comment, “That relationship was D.O.A. from the start.”
  • If a person’s car breaks down and cannot be repaired, they might say, “Looks like my car is D.O.A.”

14. Washed up

This phrase is used to describe someone who was once successful or in their prime but is now considered to be past their peak or no longer relevant or successful. It originated from the idea of something being washed up onto the shore, implying that it is no longer useful or valuable.

  • For instance, if a former athlete is no longer able to compete at the same level, they might be referred to as “washed up.”
  • If a musician’s career declines and they are no longer producing popular music, someone might say, “They’re washed up.”
  • In a discussion about a once-popular TV show that is no longer successful, someone might comment, “That show is washed up.”

15. Done for

This phrase is used to describe a situation or person that is beyond hope or rescue, often implying that the outcome is inevitable and there is no chance of recovery or success.

  • For example, if someone’s car engine completely fails and cannot be repaired, they might say, “My car is done for.”
  • In a discussion about a failed business venture, someone might comment, “It’s done for, there’s no way to salvage it.”
  • If a person loses all their money and assets, they might feel hopeless and think, “I’m done for.”

16. In a bind

This phrase is used to describe being in a difficult or challenging situation with no easy solution or way out.

  • For example, “I’m in a bind because I promised to be in two places at once.”
  • A person might say, “I’m really in a bind here. I don’t know how to fix this problem.”
  • Another example could be, “I’m in a bind financially and don’t know how to pay my bills.”

17. In a rut

This phrase is used to describe being stuck in a monotonous or unfulfilling routine without any progress or excitement.

  • For instance, “I feel like I’m in a rut. Every day feels the same.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to make a change in my life. I’m tired of being in a rut.”
  • Another example could be, “I’m in a rut at work. I’m doing the same tasks over and over again.”

18. In over your head

This phrase is used to describe being overwhelmed or unable to cope with a situation that is beyond one’s capabilities.

  • For example, “I thought I could handle the project, but I’m in over my head.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in over my head with this new job. I don’t have the necessary skills.”
  • Another example could be, “I’m in over my head with this relationship. I don’t know how to handle the problems.”

19. Out of options

This phrase is used to describe a situation where all possible options or choices have been exhausted.

  • For instance, “I’m out of options. I’ve tried everything to solve this problem.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m out of options when it comes to finding a job. I’ve applied everywhere.”
  • Another example could be, “I’m out of options for fixing my car. I can’t afford the repairs.”

20. In a tailspin

This phrase is used to describe a situation where things are rapidly deteriorating or spiraling out of control.

  • For example, “After losing his job, he went into a tailspin and couldn’t recover.”
  • A person might say, “My life is in a tailspin right now. Everything is falling apart.”
  • Another example could be, “The company is in a tailspin and might go bankrupt.”

21. Sunk

When someone is “sunk,” it means they are in a state of defeat or hopelessness. It can be used to describe a person or a situation.

  • For example, “After losing all his money in the stock market, he felt completely sunk.”
  • In a sports context, one might say, “With only a few minutes left in the game and a 20-point deficit, the team is sunk.”
  • A student might say, “I didn’t study at all for the exam, so I’m totally sunk.”

22. Flogging a dead horse

This phrase means to continue to work on or discuss something that is already decided or no longer has any value. It implies that the effort is pointless and will not lead to any positive outcome.

  • For instance, “Trying to convince him to change his mind is like flogging a dead horse.”
  • In a business setting, someone might say, “We’ve already addressed that issue and made a decision. We’re just flogging a dead horse by bringing it up again.”
  • A friend might advise, “Stop arguing with her. It’s like flogging a dead horse. It won’t change anything.”

23. Dismal

When something is described as “dismal,” it means it is gloomy, depressing, or lacking in any positive aspects. It can refer to a person’s mood or the overall atmosphere of a situation.

  • For example, “The weather forecast for the weekend is dismal, with rain and clouds predicted.”
  • In a review of a movie, one might say, “The film was a dismal failure, with a weak plot and poor acting.”
  • A student might describe their grades as dismal, saying, “I studied hard, but my test results were still dismal.”

24. No-win situation

A “no-win situation” is a scenario in which there are no options or choices that will lead to a positive or favorable outcome. It implies that any decision or action taken will result in a negative outcome.

  • For instance, “He was caught between a rock and a hard place, facing a no-win situation.”
  • In a dilemma, someone might say, “No matter what I do, someone will be upset. It’s a no-win situation.”
  • A person might describe a job with unrealistic expectations as a no-win situation, saying, “The workload is impossible to manage. It’s a no-win situation.”

25. Forsaken

When someone or something is described as “forsaken,” it means they have been abandoned or left behind. It can refer to people, places, or even emotions.

  • For example, “The old house stood in a forsaken state, with broken windows and overgrown weeds.”
  • In a relationship, someone might feel forsaken, saying, “After the breakup, I felt completely forsaken and alone.”
  • A person might describe a remote and desolate location as forsaken, saying, “The small town was so far from civilization, it felt forsaken.”

26. Despondent

When someone is despondent, they feel completely overwhelmed by sadness or loss of hope.

  • For example, “After failing the exam, she became despondent and didn’t leave her room for days.”
  • Another example, “He felt despondent after his long-term relationship ended.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s struggles, you might hear, “She’s been feeling despondent lately and could use some support.”

27. Defeated

When someone is defeated, they feel as though they have been overcome by a situation or opponent, leaving them with no hope or chance of success.

  • For instance, “After losing the game, he walked off the field defeated.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult challenge, someone might say, “I feel defeated and don’t know how to overcome this obstacle.”
  • Another example, “She looked defeated as she handed in her resignation letter.”

28. Forlorn

When someone is forlorn, they feel abandoned, lonely, or without hope.

  • For example, “She sat on the park bench, looking forlorn and lost.”
  • In a conversation about a breakup, someone might say, “He felt forlorn after the end of his long-term relationship.”
  • Another example, “The abandoned puppy looked forlorn as it sat by the side of the road.”

29. Utterly defeated

When someone is utterly defeated, they feel completely and hopelessly beaten, with no chance of recovery or success.

  • For instance, “After losing the championship game, the team was utterly defeated.”
  • In a discussion about a failed project, someone might say, “We were utterly defeated by the complexity of the task.”
  • Another example, “She felt utterly defeated after being rejected from her dream job.”
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