Top 49 Slang For Hot Dog – Meaning & Usage

Hot dogs, a classic American favorite, have their own set of slang terms that vary from region to region. From the Chicago dog to the Coney Island hot dog, we’ve gathered the top slang for hot dog in this mouthwatering listicle. Whether you’re a hot dog aficionado or just curious about the different ways to enjoy this iconic street food, our comprehensive guide will have you craving for more!

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1. Red hot

This term refers to a hot dog that is made with spicy sausage or has a spicy flavor. It can also be used to describe a hot dog that is cooked until it is very hot.

  • For example, at a barbecue, someone might say, “I like my hot dogs red hot with lots of mustard.”
  • In a restaurant, a customer might ask, “Do you have any red hot dogs on the menu?”
  • A hot dog vendor might advertise, “Try our famous red hot dogs for a delicious kick of heat!”

2. Weenie

This is a colloquial term for a small or thin hot dog. It can also be used as a playful or teasing term to refer to someone who is weak or timid.

  • For instance, at a cookout, someone might say, “I’ll just have a weenie, please.”
  • In a joking manner, someone might say, “Don’t be such a weenie, it’s just a little hot dog.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Do you want a weenie for lunch?”

3. Footlong

This term refers to a hot dog that is 12 inches in length, or a foot long. It is often used to describe a larger or more substantial hot dog.

  • For example, at a sporting event, a fan might say, “I’ll take a footlong hot dog with all the toppings.”
  • In a restaurant, a customer might ask, “Do you have footlong hot dogs on the menu?”
  • A hot dog vendor might advertise, “Try our famous footlong hot dogs for a satisfying meal!”

4. Brat

This term refers to a hot dog that is made with bratwurst, a type of German sausage. It is often used to describe a hot dog with a distinctive flavor.

  • For instance, at a barbecue, someone might say, “I’ll have a brat hot dog with sauerkraut.”
  • In a restaurant, a customer might ask, “Do you serve brat hot dogs?”
  • A hot dog vendor might advertise, “Try our delicious brat hot dogs for a taste of Germany!”

5. Choo-choo

This term refers to a hot dog that is loaded with a variety of toppings, resembling a train with multiple cars. It is often used to describe a hot dog with a generous amount of condiments and toppings.

  • For example, at a baseball game, a fan might say, “I’ll have a choo-choo hot dog with ketchup, mustard, relish, onions, and sauerkraut.”
  • In a restaurant, a customer might ask, “Can I get a choo-choo hot dog with all the fixings?”
  • A hot dog vendor might advertise, “Try our famous choo-choo hot dogs loaded with your favorite toppings!”

6. Franks

This is a common slang term for hot dogs. It is often used in casual conversations and informal settings.

  • For example, at a summer barbecue, someone might say, “Pass me one of those franks!”
  • In a fast food restaurant, a customer might order, “I’ll have two franks with all the toppings.”
  • A hot dog vendor might advertise, “Come get your delicious franks right here!”

7. Banger

This slang term is derived from British English and is sometimes used to refer to a hot dog, especially in the context of street food or casual dining.

  • For instance, at a food truck festival, a vendor might advertise, “Try our famous bangers!”
  • In a conversation about international cuisine, someone might mention, “In the UK, they call hot dogs ‘bangers’.”
  • A person sharing their favorite comfort foods might say, “Nothing beats a good banger in a bun.”

8. Sausage in a bun

This is a literal description of a hot dog, where the sausage is placed in a bun. It is a straightforward and descriptive term.

  • For example, at a baseball game, a fan might say, “I’ll take a sausage in a bun with mustard and onions.”
  • In a discussion about typical American food, someone might mention, “Hot dogs are essentially sausages in buns.”
  • A person sharing their favorite way to eat hot dogs might say, “I love adding ketchup and relish to my sausage in a bun.”

9. Frank

This is a shortened version of the word “frankfurter,” which is another term for a hot dog. It is commonly used in informal conversations and is easily understood.

  • For instance, at a cookout, a host might ask, “Would you like a frank?”
  • In a discussion about ballpark food, someone might say, “I always make sure to grab a frank before the game.”
  • A person sharing their favorite toppings for hot dogs might say, “I love loading my frank with chili and cheese.”

10. Dachshund

This slang term is derived from the breed of dog called Dachshund, which has a long and narrow body shape similar to a hot dog. It is a playful and lighthearted way to refer to a hot dog.

  • For example, at a picnic, someone might say, “I’ll have a dachshund with mustard, please.”
  • In a conversation about unique food nicknames, someone might mention, “Did you know hot dogs are sometimes called dachshunds?”
  • A person sharing their love for hot dogs might say, “I can’t resist a good dachshund with all the fixings.”

11. Casing

The casing refers to the natural or artificial skin that encases the hot dog. It is typically made from collagen, cellulose, or other materials and helps to hold the shape of the hot dog during cooking.

  • For example, “I prefer natural casings because they give the hot dog a satisfying snap when you bite into it.”
  • A chef might explain, “We use collagen casings for our hot dogs because they are more uniform in size and have a consistent texture.”
  • A hot dog connoisseur might say, “The casing is an important factor in the overall taste and mouthfeel of a hot dog.”

A link is another word for a hot dog, specifically referring to the shape of the meat. It is called a link because it is traditionally made by linking or twisting together a long rope of sausage before it is cooked or smoked.

  • For instance, “I’ll have two hot dog links with mustard and sauerkraut.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you prefer your links grilled or boiled?”
  • Another might say, “I love the smoky flavor of a well-cooked link.”

13. Chicago-style

Chicago-style refers to a specific way of preparing and serving a hot dog. It typically includes toppings such as mustard, onions, relish, tomatoes, pickles, peppers, and celery salt, all served on a poppy seed bun. This style is known for its abundant and flavorful toppings.

  • For example, “I had a delicious Chicago-style hot dog with all the fixings.”
  • A person might say, “You can’t visit Chicago without trying a Chicago-style hot dog.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you prefer a traditional hot dog or a Chicago-style hot dog with all the toppings?”

14. Kraut dog

A kraut dog refers to a hot dog topped with sauerkraut, which is fermented cabbage. This topping adds a tangy and slightly sour flavor to the hot dog.

  • For instance, “I love the combination of the savory hot dog and the tangy sauerkraut in a kraut dog.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll have a kraut dog with mustard and onions, please.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you prefer your kraut dog with spicy or mild sauerkraut?”

15. Dirty water dog

A dirty water dog is a hot dog that has been boiled in water or a seasoned broth. The term “dirty water” refers to the water or broth that the hot dogs are cooked in, which can become cloudy or murky from repeated use.

  • For example, “I grabbed a quick dirty water dog from a street vendor.”
  • A person might say, “I like my dirty water dog with mustard and relish.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you prefer your hot dogs grilled or dirty water style?”

16. Corn dog

A corn dog is a hot dog that has been coated in a thick layer of cornmeal batter and deep-fried. It is typically served on a stick for easy eating.

  • For example, at a fair or carnival, you might see a vendor selling corn dogs.
  • A person might say, “I love the crispy outer layer of a corn dog.”
  • Another might ask, “Have you ever tried a corn dog with mustard?”

17. Pooch

“Pooch” is a slang term for a hot dog. It is often used in informal settings or among friends.

  • For instance, at a backyard barbecue, someone might say, “Pass me a pooch.”
  • A person might ask, “Would you like ketchup or mustard on your pooch?”
  • Another might comment, “I like my pooch with sauerkraut and relish.”

18. Chihuahua

“Chihuahua” is a playful term used to refer to a small hot dog. It is named after the breed of dog known for its small size.

  • For example, at a baseball game, someone might say, “I’ll have a chihuahua with extra onions.”
  • A person might comment, “I prefer chihuahuas over regular-sized hot dogs.”
  • Another might ask, “Do they make mini buns for chihuahuas?”

19. Weenie roast

A weenie roast is an outdoor gathering or event where hot dogs are cooked over an open fire or grill. It is a social activity that often involves friends or family.

  • For instance, during a camping trip, someone might suggest, “Let’s have a weenie roast for dinner.”
  • A person might say, “I love the smell of a weenie roast.”
  • Another might comment, “Weenie roasts are a fun way to enjoy hot dogs with friends.”

20. Chicago dog

A Chicago dog is a specific style of hot dog that originated in Chicago, Illinois. It is typically topped with mustard, chopped onions, sweet pickle relish, tomato slices, pickle spears, sport peppers, and celery salt, all served on a poppy seed bun.

  • For example, in Chicago, someone might order, “I’ll have a Chicago dog with everything.”
  • A person might comment, “The combination of toppings on a Chicago dog is unique and delicious.”
  • Another might ask, “Have you ever tried a Chicago dog without the sport peppers?”

21. Pigs in a blanket

Pigs in a blanket are mini hot dogs or sausages wrapped in dough and baked until golden brown. They are often served as appetizers or party snacks.

  • For example, “I made pigs in a blanket for the game night with my friends.”
  • A parent might say, “My kids love eating pigs in a blanket for lunch.”
  • At a party, someone might comment, “I can’t resist grabbing a few pigs in a blanket from the appetizer table.”

22. Sausage on a stick

Sausage on a stick refers to a hot dog or sausage that is skewered on a stick for easy eating. It is a popular street food or fair food option.

  • For instance, “I always get a sausage on a stick at the county fair.”
  • A food vendor might advertise, “Try our delicious sausage on a stick, perfect for on-the-go snacking.”
  • At a barbecue, someone might say, “I love grilling sausages on sticks for a fun twist on hot dogs.”

23. Weiner schnitzel

Weiner schnitzel is a breaded and fried hot dog. It is a popular dish in German cuisine and is often served with mustard or other condiments.

  • For example, “I had the most delicious weiner schnitzel at a German restaurant.”
  • A chef might say, “Our specialty is homemade weiner schnitzel with a crispy coating.”
  • A food enthusiast might comment, “I love trying different variations of weiner schnitzel, it’s such a unique dish.”

24. Bratwurst roll

A bratwurst roll refers to a bratwurst, a type of German sausage, served in a bun. It is a popular choice for hot dog enthusiasts who enjoy the flavors of bratwurst.

  • For instance, “I topped my bratwurst roll with sauerkraut and spicy mustard.”
  • A vendor might advertise, “Try our juicy bratwurst rolls with your choice of toppings.”
  • At a summer cookout, someone might say, “Pass me a bratwurst roll, please. They’re my favorite.”

25. Hot link

A hot link is a spicy sausage, often made with pork or beef. It is known for its spicy flavor and is commonly grilled or smoked before being served.

  • For example, “I love the kick of heat in a hot link.”
  • A barbecue enthusiast might say, “Hot links are a must-have at any backyard cookout.”
  • A fan of spicy food might comment, “Hot links are my go-to choice when I want something flavorful and spicy.”

26. Polish sausage

A type of sausage that originated in Poland and is typically made from pork. Polish sausage is often grilled or smoked and is known for its rich flavor and firm texture.

  • For example, at a barbecue, someone might say, “I’ll have a Polish sausage with sauerkraut and mustard.”
  • In a discussion about different types of sausages, someone might mention, “Polish sausage is a popular ingredient in traditional Polish dishes.”
  • A food enthusiast might recommend, “If you’re ever in Poland, you have to try authentic Polish sausage.”

27. Smokie

A term used to refer to a smoked sausage, often made from pork or beef. Smokies are typically seasoned with various spices and have a distinct smoky flavor.

  • For instance, at a cookout, someone might ask, “Do you want a regular hot dog or a smokie?”
  • In a conversation about different types of sausages, someone might mention, “Smokies are a popular choice for adding flavor to dishes.”
  • A food blogger might share a recipe, saying, “These smokie sliders are perfect for game day snacks.”

28. Vienna sausage

A type of sausage that originated in Vienna, Austria. Vienna sausages are typically made from pork and are known for their small size and delicate flavor.

  • For example, someone might say, “I like to snack on Vienna sausages straight from the can.”
  • In a discussion about international cuisine, someone might mention, “Vienna sausages are a staple in Austrian cuisine.”
  • A food lover might suggest, “Try adding Vienna sausages to your next charcuterie board for a unique twist.”

29. Red snapper

A term used to refer to a hot dog made from red snapper fish instead of traditional meat. Red snapper hot dogs are known for their unique flavor and are often enjoyed at seafood festivals or coastal regions.

  • For instance, at a seafood festival, someone might say, “I’ll have a red snapper with all the toppings.”
  • In a conversation about unique hot dog variations, someone might mention, “Red snapper hot dogs are a popular specialty in coastal areas.”
  • A food critic might write, “The red snapper hot dog at this seafood shack is a must-try for seafood lovers.”

30. Texas Tommy

A type of hot dog that is wrapped in bacon before being grilled or fried. The bacon adds a smoky and savory flavor to the hot dog, creating a delicious combination.

  • For example, at a food truck, someone might say, “I’ll take a Texas Tommy with extra cheese.”
  • In a discussion about creative hot dog toppings, someone might mention, “The Texas Tommy is a popular choice for bacon lovers.”
  • A foodie might share a recipe, saying, “Try making your own Texas Tommy at home by wrapping the hot dog in bacon and grilling it to perfection.”

31. Slaw dog

A “slaw dog” is a hot dog topped with coleslaw. The coleslaw adds a crunchy and tangy element to the hot dog.

  • For example, “I’ll have a slaw dog with extra mustard, please.”
  • At a cookout, someone might say, “Pass me a slaw dog, they’re my favorite.”
  • A food enthusiast might write, “The combination of the creamy coleslaw and the savory hot dog makes the slaw dog a winning combination.”

32. Reuben dog

A “Reuben dog” is a hot dog topped with sauerkraut, Swiss cheese, and Russian dressing. It is inspired by the classic Reuben sandwich.

  • For instance, “I’ll take a Reuben dog with extra sauerkraut, please.”
  • At a baseball game, someone might say, “I can’t resist a Reuben dog, it’s the perfect combination of flavors.”
  • A food blogger might post, “The Reuben dog takes the classic Reuben sandwich to a whole new level with the addition of a juicy hot dog.”

33. Chili dog

A “chili dog” is a hot dog topped with chili. The chili adds a hearty and spicy element to the hot dog.

  • For example, “I’ll have a chili dog with extra onions, please.”
  • At a barbecue, someone might say, “Pass me a chili dog, I love the combination of the hot dog and the flavorful chili.”
  • A food critic might write, “The chili dog is a classic American staple, perfect for indulging in at a summer cookout.”

34. Snag

“Snag” is a slang term for a hot dog. It is commonly used in Australian English.

  • For instance, “Let’s grab a snag from the barbecue.”
  • At a picnic, someone might say, “Who wants a snag? They’re fresh off the grill.”
  • An Australian food blogger might write, “The snag is a beloved Australian favorite, especially when served with tomato sauce and onions.”

35. Rollie

A “rollie” is a slang term for a hot dog in a bun. It refers to the act of rolling the hot dog in the bun.

  • For example, “I’ll take a rollie with ketchup and mustard, please.”
  • At a baseball game, someone might say, “Pass me a rollie, I need something to snack on.”
  • A food lover might post, “There’s something satisfying about biting into a perfectly grilled rollie with all the toppings.”

36. Kosher dog

A kosher dog is a hot dog that is made according to Jewish dietary laws. It is typically made from beef and does not contain any pork or other non-kosher ingredients.

  • For example, “I’m going to have a kosher dog with mustard and sauerkraut.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer the taste of a kosher dog over a regular hot dog.”
  • At a Jewish deli, you might see a menu item for a kosher dog.
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37. Ballpark frank

A ballpark frank is a hot dog that is typically served at baseball stadiums. It is often grilled or steamed and served in a bun with various toppings.

  • For instance, “I love eating a ballpark frank with onions and mustard while watching a game.”
  • A baseball fan might say, “You can’t go to a game without getting a ballpark frank.”
  • At a concession stand in a stadium, you might see signs advertising a ballpark frank.

38. Sausage sandwich

A sausage sandwich is a hot dog that is served in a sandwich format. It typically consists of a grilled or steamed sausage placed in a sliced bun with various condiments and toppings.

  • For example, “I’m going to have a sausage sandwich with grilled peppers and onions.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer a sausage sandwich over a regular hot dog because it feels more substantial.”
  • At a food truck, you might see a menu item for a sausage sandwich.

39. Bratwurst dog

A bratwurst dog is a hot dog that is made from bratwurst sausage. Bratwurst is a type of German sausage that is often made from pork, beef, or veal and flavored with various spices.

  • For instance, “I’m going to have a bratwurst dog with sauerkraut and spicy mustard.”
  • A person might say, “I love the smoky flavor of a bratwurst dog.”
  • At a German restaurant, you might see a menu item for a bratwurst dog.

40. Sausage on a bun

A sausage on a bun is another term for a hot dog. It refers to a sausage that is served on a bun, typically with various toppings and condiments.

  • For example, “I’m going to have a sausage on a bun with ketchup and relish.”
  • A person might say, “I like to keep it simple and just have a sausage on a bun.”
  • At a street food vendor, you might see a sign advertising sausage on a bun.
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41. Pooch in a bun

This is a humorous way of referring to a hot dog, comparing it to a small dog inside a bun. It is a playful and lighthearted term.

  • For example, at a backyard barbecue, someone might say, “Who wants a pooch in a bun?”
  • In a conversation about food, a person might ask, “Have you ever tried a pooch in a bun?”
  • A hot dog vendor might advertise, “Come get your delicious pooch in a bun!”

42. Dog on a stick

This term refers to a hot dog that has been coated in cornmeal batter and deep-fried on a stick. It is a common fair and carnival food.

  • For instance, at a state fair, you might hear someone say, “I’m craving a dog on a stick.”
  • In a discussion about unique food items, a person might mention, “Have you ever tried a corn dog? It’s basically a dog on a stick.”
  • A food blogger might write, “One of the most popular fair foods is the classic dog on a stick.”

43. Wiener schnitzel

This term refers to a hot dog that has been breaded and fried, similar to a traditional schnitzel. It is a creative and unique way of preparing a hot dog.

  • For example, at a German-themed restaurant, you might see “wiener schnitzel” listed on the menu as a hot dog variation.
  • In a conversation about international cuisine, a person might say, “I recently tried a wiener schnitzel hot dog. It was delicious!”
  • A food critic might write, “The restaurant’s specialty is their wiener schnitzel hot dog, a must-try for hot dog enthusiasts.”

44. Pup

This is a casual and affectionate term for a hot dog, comparing it to a young dog or puppy. It is a playful and endearing way to refer to a hot dog.

  • For instance, at a baseball game, a fan might say, “I’ll have a pup and a cold drink.”
  • In a discussion about favorite ballpark foods, someone might mention, “You can’t go wrong with a classic pup.”
  • A hot dog lover might declare, “I could eat pups every day!”

45. Frank on a roll

This term refers to a hot dog served inside a roll or bun. It is a straightforward and descriptive way of referring to a hot dog.

  • For example, at a cookout, someone might ask, “Do you want a frank on a roll?”
  • In a conversation about picnic foods, a person might say, “I always make sure to pack franks on rolls.”
  • A hot dog vendor might advertise, “Get your franks on rolls, fresh and delicious!”

46. Hot diggity dog

This phrase is used to express excitement or enthusiasm for a hot dog. It is often used to convey a sense of enjoyment or satisfaction when eating a hot dog.

  • For example, someone might exclaim, “Hot diggity dog, this is the best hot dog I’ve ever had!”
  • In a conversation about favorite foods, a person might say, “I love hot diggity dogs with all the toppings.”
  • When describing a delicious meal, a food critic might write, “The hot diggity dog at this restaurant is a must-try.”

47. Weinerwurst

Weinerwurst refers to a type of hot dog with German origins. It is often made with a mixture of pork and beef, seasoned with various spices, and served in a bun.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I had a delicious Weinerwurst at a German beer festival.”
  • In a discussion about international cuisine, someone might ask, “Have you ever tried a Weinerwurst?”
  • A food blogger might write, “The Weinerwurst is a popular street food in Germany, known for its flavorful combination of meats and spices.”

48. Hot doggie

Hot doggie is a cute or playful term used to refer to a hot dog. It is often used in a lighthearted or affectionate manner.

  • For example, a parent might say to their child, “Do you want a hot doggie for lunch?”
  • In a conversation about pet names for food, someone might mention, “I like to call hot dogs hot doggies.”
  • When describing a fun and casual meal, a person might say, “Let’s have a picnic with hot doggies and potato chips.”

49. Hot wiener

Hot wiener is a regional term used to refer to a specific type of hot dog. It is commonly found in the state of Rhode Island and is characterized by its small size, unique seasoning, and toppings such as meat sauce, mustard, onions, and celery salt.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I grew up eating hot wieners at my favorite Rhode Island diner.”
  • In a discussion about regional cuisine, someone might ask, “Have you ever tried a hot wiener from Rhode Island?”
  • A travel blogger might write, “If you’re ever in Rhode Island, don’t miss the chance to try a hot wiener – it’s a local specialty!”