Top 33 Slang For Humanity – Meaning & Usage

In a world where language evolves at lightning speed, keeping up with the latest slang can be a challenge. But fear not, we’ve got you covered with a handpicked selection of the most current and trendy slang for humanity. From phrases that make you LOL to expressions that hit you right in the feels, this listicle is your go-to guide for staying hip and in the know. So sit back, relax, and get ready to upgrade your vocab game with our curated collection of slang for humanity.

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1. Homo sapiens

This term refers to the scientific name for the species of modern humans. It is often used in a more formal or technical context.

  • For example, a biology textbook might state, “Homo sapiens is the only surviving species of the genus Homo.”
  • In a conversation about evolution, someone might say, “Homo sapiens emerged as the dominant species on Earth.”
  • A person discussing human origins might mention, “Homo sapiens evolved in Africa around 300,000 years ago.”

2. Earthlings

This term refers to people who live on planet Earth. It is often used in a playful or science fiction context.

  • For instance, in a sci-fi movie, an alien might refer to humans as “Earthlings.”
  • In a conversation about space exploration, someone might say, “Imagine if Earthlings made contact with extraterrestrial life.”
  • A person discussing the uniqueness of Earth might mention, “Earthlings are fortunate to live on a planet with such diverse ecosystems.”

3. Mankind

This term refers to the collective human race or all human beings. It is often used in a philosophical or literary context.

  • For example, a famous quote by Mahatma Gandhi states, “The greatness of a nation can be judged by how it treats its weakest members of mankind.”
  • In a discussion about human achievements, someone might say, “Mankind has made incredible advancements in technology.”
  • A person reflecting on the human condition might mention, “The struggles and triumphs of mankind are what shape our history.”

4. Mortals

This term refers to people who are subject to death and are not immortal. It is often used in a mythical or poetic context.

  • For instance, in Greek mythology, gods are often portrayed as immortal beings while humans are referred to as mortals.
  • In a conversation about superheroes, someone might say, “Even superheroes have their weaknesses and vulnerabilities as mortals.”
  • A person discussing the limitations of human life might mention, “Mortals are reminded of their mortality and the importance of making the most of their time.”

5. Human race

This term refers to the collective group of human beings or the human species. It is often used in a more general or inclusive context.

  • For example, a speaker addressing a crowd might say, “We must work together for the betterment of the human race.”
  • In a discussion about diversity, someone might say, “The human race is made up of people with different backgrounds, cultures, and beliefs.”
  • A person reflecting on the future of humanity might mention, “The survival and progress of the human race depend on our ability to address global challenges.”

6. Homo erectus

Homo erectus is an extinct species of human that lived between 1.9 million and 70,000 years ago. The term “caveman” is often used to refer to early humans, including Homo erectus.

  • For instance, in a discussion about human evolution, someone might say, “Homo erectus was one of the first human species to use fire.”
  • In a comedic context, a person might jokingly refer to themselves as a caveman, saying, “Me Homo erectus. Me no understand fancy technology.”
  • A teacher might explain to students, “Homo erectus were skilled toolmakers and were able to adapt to different environments.”

7. Peeps

“Peeps” is a slang term used to refer to people or individuals. It is a casual and friendly way to talk about a group of individuals.

  • For example, a person might say, “Hey, I’m meeting up with some peeps later. Do you want to join?”
  • In a conversation about a social gathering, someone might ask, “Who are your peeps that are coming?”
  • A person might introduce their friends by saying, “These are my peeps. We’ve known each other since high school.”

8. Homo habilis

Homo habilis is an extinct species of human that lived between 2.4 and 1.4 million years ago. The term “handyman” is sometimes used to refer to Homo habilis due to their ability to use tools.

  • For instance, in a discussion about human evolution, someone might say, “Homo habilis were the first humans to use stone tools.”
  • In a humorous context, a person might refer to themselves as a handyman, saying, “I’m like Homo habilis with my DIY skills.”
  • A teacher might explain to students, “Homo habilis had a larger brain and more advanced tool-making abilities compared to earlier human species.”

9. Folks

“Folks” is a colloquial term used to refer to people or individuals. It is a friendly and inclusive way to address a group of people.

  • For example, a person might say, “Hey, folks! How’s everyone doing today?”
  • In a conversation about a gathering, someone might ask, “Are all the folks here?”
  • A person might introduce a group of individuals by saying, “These are my folks. We all work at the same company.”

10. Homo neanderthalensis

Homo neanderthalensis is an extinct species of human that lived between 400,000 and 40,000 years ago. The term “Neanderthal” is often used to refer to this species, and can be used metaphorically to describe someone as primitive or uncivilized.

  • For instance, in a discussion about human evolution, someone might say, “Neanderthals had a robust build and lived in cold environments.”
  • In a joking context, a person might say, “He still uses a flip phone? He’s such a Neanderthal.”
  • A teacher might explain to students, “Neanderthals had a complex social structure and were capable of creating tools and art.”

11. Homo floresiensis

This is a species of extinct hominins that lived on the Indonesian island of Flores. They were nicknamed “hobbits” due to their small stature, with an average height of about 3.5 feet.

  • For instance, a paleontologist might say, “The discovery of Homo floresiensis revolutionized our understanding of human evolution.”
  • In a discussion about ancient human relatives, someone might ask, “Do you think Homo floresiensis had a similar social structure to modern humans?”
  • A science enthusiast might share, “I find the story of the hobbits fascinating. Homo floresiensis is such a unique branch in our family tree.”

12. Homo naledi

This is a species of extinct hominins that lived in South Africa. The name “naledi” means “star” in the Sesotho language. The species is known for its unique burial practices, suggesting a level of sophistication not typically associated with early humans.

  • For example, an archaeologist might say, “The discovery of Homo naledi’s burial chamber was a groundbreaking find.”
  • In a discussion about human evolution, someone might ask, “What sets Homo naledi apart from other hominin species?”
  • A science writer might explain, “Homo naledi challenges our previous assumptions about the development of complex behaviors in early humans.”

13. Homo heidelbergensis

This is an extinct species of hominins that lived in Africa, Europe, and possibly Asia. They are believed to be a common ancestor of both Neanderthals and modern humans.

  • For instance, an anthropologist might say, “Homo heidelbergensis played a crucial role in our evolutionary history.”
  • In a discussion about human migration, someone might ask, “Did Homo heidelbergensis contribute to the population of both Europe and Asia?”
  • A science enthusiast might share, “I find it fascinating that Homo heidelbergensis lived alongside other hominin species and eventually gave rise to Neanderthals.”

14. Homo luzonensis

This is an extinct species of hominins that lived on the island of Luzon in the Philippines. The discovery of Homo luzonensis is relatively recent, with fossils dating back to around 67,000 years ago.

  • For example, an archaeologist might say, “The discovery of Homo luzonensis expands our understanding of human migration in Southeast Asia.”
  • In a discussion about the peopling of the Philippines, someone might ask, “What role did Homo luzonensis play in the region’s history?”
  • A science writer might explain, “Homo luzonensis adds another layer of complexity to the story of human evolution in Asia.”

15. Homo rhodesiensis

This is an extinct species of hominins that lived in Africa. The term “Rhodesian Man” refers to the fact that the first fossils were discovered in what is now Zimbabwe, which was formerly known as Rhodesia.

  • For instance, a paleontologist might say, “Homo rhodesiensis provides valuable insights into the diversity of early humans in Africa.”
  • In a discussion about human origins, someone might ask, “What distinguishes Homo rhodesiensis from other hominin species?”
  • A science enthusiast might share, “I find it fascinating how Homo rhodesiensis fits into the broader picture of human evolution in Africa.”

16. Peoplekind

– For example, a person might say, “We should strive for equality and respect for all peoplekind.”

  • In a discussion about gender-neutral language, someone might comment, “Using peoplekind instead of mankind is a small but important step towards inclusivity.”
  • A speaker advocating for inclusive language might say, “Let’s use peoplekind to acknowledge and include all genders.”

17. Human beings

– For instance, a person might say, “Human beings have evolved over thousands of years.”

  • In a discussion about human rights, someone might argue, “All human beings are entitled to basic rights and dignity.”
  • A scientist studying human evolution might state, “Understanding the genetic makeup of human beings can provide insights into our shared history.”

18. Homo gautengensis

– For example, a paleoanthropologist might say, “The discovery of Homo gautengensis remains could shed light on human evolution in Africa.”

  • In a discussion about early human ancestors, someone might ask, “What are the distinguishing characteristics of Homo gautengensis?”
  • A researcher studying human evolution might state, “Further study is needed to determine the validity of the Homo gautengensis classification.”

19. Humanoids

– For instance, in a discussion about robots, someone might say, “Humanoid robots are designed to mimic human movement and behavior.”

  • In a science fiction novel, a character might encounter a group of humanoid aliens on a distant planet.
  • A fan of fantasy literature might comment, “I love stories with humanoid creatures like elves and dwarves.”

20. Earth dwellers

– For example, a person concerned about environmental issues might say, “We need to take better care of our planet, fellow earth dwellers.”

  • In a discussion about space exploration, someone might ask, “What are the challenges of becoming interplanetary earth dwellers?”
  • A poet might write, “We are all earth dwellers, bound together by the beauty and fragility of our home planet.”

21. Terrans

This term is often used in science fiction to refer to humans from Earth. It is derived from the word “terra,” which means Earth.

  • For example, in a sci-fi novel, a character might say, “The Terrans united to fight against the alien invasion.”
  • In a discussion about space exploration, someone might ask, “Do you think Terrans will be the first to colonize other planets?”
  • A fan of science fiction might say, “I love reading stories about Terrans exploring the galaxy.”

22. Earthicans

This term is a playful way to refer to humans who reside on Earth. It is a combination of the words “Earth” and “Americans,” but it can be used to describe people from any country.

  • For instance, in an animated TV show set in the future, a character might exclaim, “We Earthicans need to stick together!”
  • In a conversation about global issues, someone might say, “Earthicans must come together to solve the climate crisis.”
  • A person proud of their Earthican heritage might declare, “I’m proud to be an Earthican!”

23. Earthmen

This term specifically refers to males who are from Earth. It is a gendered term and is used to distinguish between male and female humans.

  • For example, in a science fiction story set in the future, a character might say, “The Earthmen formed a council to govern the planet.”
  • In a discussion about gender equality, someone might argue, “We need to ensure equal opportunities for Earthmen and Earthwomen.”
  • A fan of science fiction might say, “I love reading about the adventures of brave Earthmen in space.”

24. Earthwomen

This term specifically refers to females who are from Earth. It is a gendered term and is used to distinguish between male and female humans.

  • For instance, in a futuristic movie, a character might say, “The Earthwomen fought alongside the Earthmen to save the planet.”
  • In a conversation about women’s rights, someone might advocate, “We must empower Earthwomen to achieve their full potential.”
  • A person proud of their Earthwoman identity might declare, “I’m a strong and independent Earthwoman!”

25. Earthfolk

This term is a more inclusive and gender-neutral way to refer to humans from Earth. It emphasizes the shared identity of all people who call Earth their home.

  • For example, in a fantasy novel, a character might say, “The Earthfolk must unite to defeat the dark forces.”
  • In a discussion about cultural diversity, someone might say, “Earthfolk have a rich tapestry of traditions and customs.”
  • A person who values unity and cooperation might declare, “We are all Earthfolk, and we should work together for a better future.”

26. Earthbound

This term refers to beings or creatures that are confined to the Earth and cannot leave its surface. It can also be used metaphorically to describe someone who feels trapped or restricted in their life.

  • For example, a science fiction story might mention, “The aliens were fascinated by the earthbound humans.”
  • In a conversation about dreams and aspirations, someone might say, “I feel earthbound, like I’m meant for something more.”
  • A person discussing the limitations of human existence might comment, “We are all earthbound by the laws of nature.”

27. Earthborn

This term describes individuals who were born on Earth. It can be used to distinguish them from beings born on other planets or in outer space.

  • For instance, a character in a science fiction novel might say, “I am not of this world, but I am earthborn.”
  • In a conversation about origins, someone might ask, “Are you earthborn or from another planet?”
  • A person discussing the uniqueness of Earth might comment, “We are all earthborn, connected by our shared home.”

28. Earthly beings

This term refers to individuals who are part of the human race and inhabit the Earth. It emphasizes the connection between humans and the physical world.

  • For example, a philosopher might ponder, “What is the purpose of earthly beings in the grand scheme of the universe?”
  • In a discussion about environmentalism, someone might say, “We must protect the Earth for the sake of all earthly beings.”
  • A person reflecting on the beauty of nature might comment, “We are all earthly beings, fortunate to witness the wonders of this planet.”

29. Earth residents

This term describes individuals who live on Earth and consider it their home. It can be used to refer to all humans or specific groups of people.

  • For instance, a news article might report, “Earth residents are concerned about climate change and its impact on the planet.”
  • In a conversation about space exploration, someone might ask, “Are there any plans to send Earth residents to Mars?”
  • A person discussing global citizenship might comment, “We are all Earth residents, responsible for the well-being of our shared home.”

30. Earth inhabitants

This term refers to beings or creatures that inhabit the Earth. It encompasses all living organisms, including humans, animals, and plants.

  • For example, a nature documentary might mention, “The diversity of Earth inhabitants is truly remarkable.”
  • In a conversation about biodiversity, someone might say, “Preserving habitats is crucial for the survival of Earth inhabitants.”
  • A person reflecting on the interconnectedness of life might comment, “We are all Earth inhabitants, part of a complex web of life on this planet.”

31. Earth citizens

This term refers to all individuals who live on Earth, regardless of nationality, race, or other factors.

  • For example, “As Earth citizens, we have a responsibility to take care of our planet.”
  • In a discussion about global issues, someone might say, “We need to come together as Earth citizens to solve these problems.”
  • Another might ask, “How can we ensure a better future for Earth citizens?”

32. Homo sapiens sapiens

This term is the scientific name for the species to which humans belong. It distinguishes modern humans from other hominid species.

  • For instance, “Homo sapiens sapiens emerged as the dominant species on Earth.”
  • In a biology class, a teacher might explain, “Homo sapiens sapiens is the only surviving species of the genus Homo.”
  • A researcher might discuss, “The evolution of Homo sapiens sapiens is a fascinating topic in anthropology.”

33. People

This is a broad term that refers to individuals of the human species. It is a commonly used term in everyday language.

  • For example, “People have been living on Earth for thousands of years.”
  • In a conversation about diversity, someone might say, “People come from different backgrounds and cultures.”
  • Another might discuss, “The rights and well-being of all people should be respected.”
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