Top 50 Slang For Humiliate – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to moments that make us cringe, we’ve all experienced a time when we felt completely humiliated. Whether it’s a slip-up in front of a crowd or a mishap in a social setting, we’ve got you covered with a list of slang terms for humiliation that will have you laughing and nodding in solidarity. Let’s dive into the world of embarrassing moments and learn how to navigate them with humor and grace.

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1. Shame

To shame someone is to make them feel embarrassed or humiliated, often by publicly exposing their flaws or mistakes.

  • For example, “He was shamed for his poor performance in front of the entire team.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t shame me for my fashion choices, I like being unique.”
  • In a discussion about body positivity, someone might say, “We should never shame others for their appearance.”

2. Roast

To roast someone is to mock or make fun of them in a playful or humorous way. It often involves clever insults or teasing.

  • For instance, “He got roasted by his friends for his terrible dancing skills.”
  • During a friendly gathering, someone might say, “Let’s have a roast session and make fun of each other.”
  • A popular celebrity might participate in a roast and say, “I’m ready to laugh at myself and be roasted by my fellow comedians.”

3. Drag

To drag someone is to publicly criticize or mock them, often with the intention of exposing their flaws or mistakes.

  • For example, “She dragged him on social media for his insensitive comments.”
  • During a heated argument, someone might say, “I’m about to drag you and expose all your lies.”
  • In a discussion about online drama, a user might comment, “The internet loves to drag celebrities for the smallest mistakes.”

4. Clown

To clown someone is to make them look foolish or stupid through jokes, sarcasm, or ridicule.

  • For instance, “He clowned his friend for tripping and falling in front of everyone.”
  • During a playful banter, someone might say, “Stop clowning me, I know I made a silly mistake.”
  • In a comedy show, a comedian might clown an audience member for their unusual outfit choice.

5. Own

To own someone is to humiliate or defeat them in a competition or argument.

  • For example, “He owned his opponent with his exceptional basketball skills.”
  • During a debate, someone might say, “I completely owned my opponent with my well-researched arguments.”
  • In a video game, a player might say, “I’m going to own you in the next round, get ready to be humiliated.”

6. Burn

To “burn” someone means to insult or make fun of them in a clever or cutting way. It is often used in a humorous or sarcastic manner.

  • For example, if someone tells a bad joke, you might say, “Oof, that’s a burn!”
  • In a playful argument, one person might say, “I can’t believe you actually thought that, burn!”
  • If someone makes a witty comeback, you might respond, “Wow, that was a sick burn!”

7. Diss

To “diss” someone means to disrespect or insult them. It is often used to express contempt or disdain towards someone.

  • For instance, if someone criticizes your fashion sense, you might say, “Don’t diss my style!”
  • In a heated argument, one person might say, “You’re just dissing me because you’re jealous!”
  • If someone insults your favorite band, you might respond, “You better watch your mouth, that’s a diss!”

8. Put down

To “put down” someone means to belittle or criticize them. It is often used to make someone feel inferior or to diminish their accomplishments.

  • For example, if someone fails a test, you might say, “Don’t let that put you down, you’ll do better next time!”
  • In a discussion about talent, one person might say, “Don’t put down their skills just because you’re jealous.”
  • If someone criticizes your work, you might respond, “Instead of putting me down, why don’t you offer some constructive feedback?”

9. Crush

To “crush” someone means to defeat or embarrass them thoroughly. It is often used to describe a one-sided victory or overwhelming success.

  • For instance, if a sports team wins a game by a large margin, you might say, “They really crushed the competition!”
  • In a debate, one person might say, “I presented so many strong arguments that I completely crushed my opponent.”
  • If someone fails a test miserably, you might say, “Ouch, that’s a crushing defeat!”

10. Embarrass

To “embarrass” someone means to make them feel self-conscious or ashamed. It is often used to describe situations where someone’s actions or words cause discomfort or humiliation.

  • For example, if someone trips and falls in front of a crowd, you might say, “That fall must have been so embarrassing!”
  • In a prank gone wrong, one person might say, “I didn’t mean to embarrass you, it was supposed to be funny.”
  • If someone tells an embarrassing story about themselves, you might respond, “Thanks for sharing, I’m sure that was really embarrassing!”

11. Humble

To humble someone means to bring them down a notch or make them feel less important or significant. It is often used to describe situations where someone’s ego or pride is deflated.

  • For example, “After losing the game, the team was humbled by their defeat.”
  • In a discussion about a celebrity’s downfall, someone might say, “Their recent scandal has certainly humbled them.”
  • A person might reflect on their own experiences and say, “Failure can be a humbling experience that teaches us valuable lessons.”

12. Tease

To tease someone means to make fun of them in a playful or light-hearted manner. It is often done with the intention of provoking a reaction or getting a rise out of someone.

  • For instance, “He likes to tease his little sister by calling her silly nicknames.”
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “Don’t take it personally, we tease each other all the time.”
  • A person might admit, “I have a tendency to tease others, but I never mean any harm by it.”

13. Mock

To mock someone means to laugh at them or ridicule them, often in a cruel or derisive manner. It involves making fun of someone with the intention of causing them emotional harm or embarrassment.

  • For example, “The bully would mock his classmates for their appearance.”
  • In a heated argument, one might say, “Stop mocking me and take this seriously.”
  • A person might reflect on their past behavior and say, “I used to mock others to fit in, but I now realize how hurtful it can be.”

14. Rib

To rib someone means to playfully tease or make jokes at their expense. It is usually done in a good-natured way and is meant to be lighthearted and humorous.

  • For instance, “He loves to rib his friends about their favorite sports teams.”
  • In a group setting, one might say, “We always rib each other, but it’s all in good fun.”
  • A person might admit, “I can’t resist the urge to rib my siblings whenever we’re together.”

15. Takedown

To takedown someone means to put them in their place or assert dominance over them in a humiliating way. It often involves exposing someone’s weaknesses or flaws in order to diminish their power or authority.

  • For example, “The debater skillfully takedown his opponent’s arguments.”
  • In a confrontational situation, one might say, “I won’t let anyone takedown me without a fight.”
  • A person might reflect on a past experience and say, “Being takedown by my peers was a wake-up call that pushed me to improve myself.”

16. Deride

To deride someone is to mock or ridicule them, often in a harsh or contemptuous manner.

  • For example, “The comedian derided the heckler in the audience.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t deride others for their mistakes; we all make them.”
  • In a conversation about a political figure, someone might comment, “Critics deride the politician’s policies as ineffective.”

17. Discredit

To discredit someone is to undermine or diminish their credibility or reputation.

  • For instance, “The journalist worked hard to discredit the false claims made by the politician.”
  • A person might say, “He tried to discredit his opponent by spreading rumors.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial study, someone might argue, “The flaws in the methodology discredit the results.”

18. Insult

To insult someone is to make an offensive or disrespectful remark towards them.

  • For example, “He insulted her appearance, which was incredibly rude.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe he insulted my intelligence like that.”
  • In a conversation about a heated argument, someone might comment, “They exchanged insults and hurtful words.”

19. Slap in the face

To slap someone in the face is to humiliate or disrespect them, often through an action or event.

  • For instance, “Being fired without cause was a slap in the face.”
  • A person might say, “His comment about her weight was a real slap in the face.”
  • In a discussion about a betrayal, someone might comment, “Finding out they were lying to me was a slap in the face.”

20. Knock off pedestal

To knock someone off their pedestal is to bring them down from a position of high regard or admiration.

  • For example, “The scandal surrounding the celebrity knocked them off their pedestal.”
  • A person might say, “He was so arrogant, I couldn’t wait to knock him off his pedestal.”
  • In a conversation about a fallen hero, someone might comment, “Recent revelations have knocked them off their pedestal in the public eye.”

21. Put on blast

This phrase is used when someone is publicly shamed or called out for their actions or behavior.

  • For example, “She got put on blast when her private messages were leaked.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to put him on blast for spreading rumors.”
  • In a social media context, someone might post, “I can’t believe she put me on blast in her story!”

22. Make a fool of

This phrase is used when someone’s actions or behavior result in them appearing foolish or ridiculous.

  • For instance, “He made a fool of himself by trying to perform a dangerous stunt.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t make a fool of yourself by wearing that ridiculous outfit.”
  • In a playful context, someone might tease, “You’re going to make a fool of yourself if you try to dance like that!”

23. Take down a notch

This phrase is used when someone’s ego or confidence is intentionally deflated or diminished.

  • For example, “She needs to be taken down a notch after her arrogant behavior.”
  • A person might say, “He’s always boasting about his accomplishments. Someone needs to take him down a notch.”
  • In a competitive setting, someone might say, “We’ll take them down a notch in the next game and show them who’s better!”

24. Show up

This phrase is used when someone’s actions or performance result in embarrassment or humiliation.

  • For instance, “He showed up his opponent with an incredible display of skill.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to show up my coworkers by completing the project ahead of schedule.”
  • In a talent show context, someone might say, “I’m going to show up the other contestants with my amazing singing voice!”

25. Dismiss

This term is used when someone is ignored, disregarded, or treated as unimportant, resulting in feelings of humiliation.

  • For example, “She dismissed his ideas during the meeting, making him feel humiliated.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe he dismissed my feelings like they didn’t matter.”
  • In a social setting, someone might say, “Don’t dismiss her opinions just because she’s younger than you!”

26. Degrade

To degrade someone means to belittle or demean them, making them feel inferior or less valuable. It is a form of humiliation.

  • For example, “He constantly degrades his employees, making them feel worthless.”
  • In a school setting, a bully might degrade their classmates by mocking their appearance or intelligence.
  • A person might say, “Don’t let anyone degrade you. You are worthy of respect.”

27. Trash talk

Trash talk refers to the act of insulting or mocking someone, often in a competitive or confrontational context. It is a way to humiliate or intimidate an opponent.

  • For instance, during a sports game, players might engage in trash talk to get into their opponents’ heads.
  • In a heated argument, someone might use trash talk to belittle the other person’s opinions or abilities.
  • A person might say, “He’s known for his trash talk on the basketball court. It’s part of his strategy.”

28. Put in their place

To put someone in their place means to assert dominance over them and make them feel inferior or submissive. It is a way to humiliate or control someone.

  • For example, a boss might put an employee in their place by publicly criticizing their work in front of others.
  • In a social setting, someone might put a rude person in their place by standing up for themselves and asserting their boundaries.
  • A person might say, “She tried to belittle me, but I quickly put her in her place.”

29. Knock the wind out of sails

To knock the wind out of someone’s sails means to deflate their confidence or enthusiasm, often by humiliating or discouraging them.

  • For instance, receiving harsh criticism can knock the wind out of someone’s sails and make them question their abilities.
  • In a competition, a defeat or setback can knock the wind out of a person’s sails and make them lose motivation.
  • A person might say, “His failure in the audition really knocked the wind out of his sails.”

30. Take to task

To take someone to task means to reprimand or criticize them for their actions or behavior. It is a way to humiliate or hold someone accountable.

  • For example, a teacher might take a student to task for not completing their homework.
  • In a workplace, a supervisor might take an employee to task for making a mistake that affected the entire team.
  • A person might say, “He was taken to task for his offensive remarks during the meeting.”

31. Make look bad

To make someone appear inferior or incompetent in front of others.

  • For example, “She made him look bad by pointing out all his mistakes.”
  • In a competitive setting, one might say, “I’m going to make my opponent look bad with my skills.”
  • A person might feel humiliated and say, “He really made me look bad in front of everyone.”

32. Take down a peg or two

To humble or deflate someone’s ego or pride.

  • For instance, “He needs to be taken down a peg or two after his arrogant behavior.”
  • In a workplace setting, a boss might say, “I need to take him down a peg or two to remind him of his place.”
  • A person might reflect on a humbling experience and say, “That experience really took me down a peg or two.”

33. Show in a bad light

To present someone in a negative or unfavorable manner.

  • For example, “The article showed the politician in a bad light by highlighting their scandals.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s actions, one might say, “His behavior showed him in a bad light.”
  • A person might feel humiliated and say, “I don’t want to be shown in a bad light in front of others.”

34. Disparage

To speak or treat someone disrespectfully or contemptuously.

  • For instance, “He constantly disparages his colleagues to make himself look better.”
  • In a heated argument, one might say, “Stop disparaging me and my abilities.”
  • A person might feel humiliated and say, “I can’t believe he disparaged me in front of everyone.”

35. Put in a bad spot

To make someone feel uncomfortable, embarrassed, or trapped.

  • For example, “She put him in a bad spot by asking personal questions in front of others.”
  • In a social setting, one might say, “I don’t want to put her in a bad spot by revealing her secret.”
  • A person might reflect on a humiliating experience and say, “Being put in a bad spot like that was really tough.”

36. Tear down

To tear someone down means to belittle or criticize them harshly, often with the intention of humiliating them.

  • For example, “She always tries to tear down her coworkers in order to make herself look better.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might say, “Don’t try to tear me down just because you’re jealous.”
  • A bully might use insults to tear down their victim and make them feel small.
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37. Rip

To rip someone means to mock or make fun of them in a teasing or hurtful way, often with the intention of humiliating them.

  • For instance, “He loves to rip on his friends, but it’s all in good fun.”
  • During a comedy roast, comedians will often rip on the guest of honor.
  • A group of friends might playfully rip on each other’s fashion choices.

38. Schooled

To school someone means to defeat them decisively in a competition or argument, often with the intention of humiliating them.

  • For example, “She schooled her opponent in the debate and won the competition.”
  • In a basketball game, one team might completely school the other with a lopsided score.
  • A chess player might say, “I’m going to school you in this match.”

39. Punked

To punk someone means to trick or deceive them in a humiliating way, often for the amusement of others.

  • For instance, “He punked his friend by pretending to be a ghost in the dark.”
  • On a prank show, the host might punk unsuspecting individuals for entertainment purposes.
  • A group of friends might punk one of their own by setting up an embarrassing situation.

40. Owned

To own someone means to completely dominate or embarrass them, often in a way that leaves them feeling humiliated.

  • For example, “He owned his opponent in the boxing match and knocked him out in the first round.”
  • In a video game, one player might own another by defeating them quickly and decisively.
  • A comedian might deliver a series of jokes that own the audience, leaving them in stitches.

41. Snub

To snub someone is to intentionally ignore or reject them, often in a rude or dismissive way.

  • For example, “She snubbed him by walking right past without saying hello.”
  • In a social setting, someone might say, “He tried to talk to her, but she snubbed him and turned away.”
  • A person might feel humiliated if they are snubbed by someone they admire or respect.
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42. Dissed

To diss someone is to disrespect or insult them, often in a public or humiliating way.

  • For instance, “He dissed her by making fun of her appearance in front of everyone.”
  • If someone is being rude or insulting, another person might say, “Why are you dissing me like that?”
  • Being dissed can be embarrassing and make a person feel humiliated.

43. Shamed

To shame someone is to publicly criticize or humiliate them for their actions or behavior.

  • For example, “She was shamed by her classmates for failing the test.”
  • If someone is caught doing something wrong, others might say, “He should be shamed for his dishonesty.”
  • Being shamed can be a deeply humiliating experience, especially when it happens in front of others.

44. Tripped

To trip someone is to cause them to stumble or fall, either physically or metaphorically. In a slang context, it can also mean to embarrass or humiliate someone.

  • For instance, “He tripped her on purpose, causing her to fall.”
  • In a social situation, someone might say, “Don’t trip me by bringing up embarrassing stories.”
  • Being tripped can be both physically and emotionally humiliating.

45. Floored

To floor someone is to surprise or shock them to the point of being speechless. In a slang context, it can also mean to humiliate or embarrass someone.

  • For example, “Her unexpected announcement floored everyone in the room.”
  • If someone is caught in a compromising situation, others might say, “He was floored when his secret was exposed.”
  • Being floored can be a humiliating experience, especially if it catches someone off guard.
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46. Burned

To be “burned” means to be embarrassed or humiliated by someone’s words or actions.

  • For example, if someone makes a joke at your expense and everyone laughs, you might say, “I just got burned.”
  • If someone criticizes your work in a harsh way, you might feel burned and respond, “Ouch, that really stung.”
  • In a friendly banter, one person might say, “I’m going to burn you so bad, you won’t recover.”

47. Roasted

To be “roasted” means to be publicly mocked or insulted, usually in a humorous way.

  • For instance, at a comedy roast, a person is subjected to jokes and insults from a group of friends or colleagues.
  • If someone makes a witty comment about your appearance or behavior, you might say, “I just got roasted.”
  • In a playful exchange, one person might say, “Prepare to be roasted!” before making a funny comment about the other person.

48. Clowned

To be “clowned” means to be made a fool of or to be treated in a way that makes you look ridiculous.

  • For example, if someone does something embarrassing and others laugh at them, you might say, “They really got clowned.”
  • If someone tells a joke at your expense and everyone finds it hilarious, you might feel like you’re being clowned.
  • In a teasing manner, one person might say, “Don’t clown yourself by trying to do something you’re not good at.”

49. Zinged

To be “zinged” means to be mocked or insulted with a quick, clever comment or retort.

  • For instance, if someone makes a witty remark about your outfit and catches you off guard, you might say, “Ouch, I just got zinged.”
  • If someone makes a sarcastic comment that leaves you speechless, they have definitely zinged you.
  • In a lighthearted banter, one person might say, “Get ready to be zinged!” before delivering a clever comeback.

50. Slayed

To “slay” someone means to humiliate or defeat them in a competition or argument.

  • For example, if you win a debate by presenting strong arguments and counterpoints, you might say, “I just slayed my opponent.”
  • If someone completely outperforms their opponent in a game or sport, they can be said to have slayed them.
  • In a competitive setting, one person might boast, “I’m going to slay the competition!” before proving their skills.