Top 72 Slang For Identified – Meaning & Usage

Identifying with a certain group or community has never been more important, and having the right slang to express that connection is key. Join us as we uncover the latest and most popular slang terms for identifying with various groups and movements. Whether you’re part of the LGBTQ+ community or a hardcore gamer, we’ve got you covered with the trendiest ways to show your identity. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to stay ahead of the curve and level up your lingo game!

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1. ID’d

This is a short form of “identified” and is often used to describe recognizing or discovering someone or something. It can refer to recognizing a person’s identity or identifying an object or situation.

  • For example, “The police quickly ID’d the suspect in the surveillance footage.”
  • In a conversation about a missing item, someone might say, “I finally ID’d the culprit who took my phone.”
  • A person sharing a story might say, “I was walking down the street when I ID’d my old high school friend.”

2. Spotted

This term is used to describe seeing or noticing someone or something. It implies a quick or casual observation.

  • For instance, “I spotted my favorite celebrity at the airport.”
  • In a discussion about wildlife, someone might say, “I spotted a rare bird in my backyard.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I spotted my ex-boyfriend at the grocery store.”

3. Tagged

This slang term is often used in the context of social media to indicate that someone has been identified or mentioned in a post or photo. It can also refer to being identified or singled out in a different context.

  • For example, “I tagged my friends in the group photo on Instagram.”
  • In a conversation about a group project, someone might say, “I tagged you as the lead presenter.”
  • A person sharing a funny story might say, “My friend tagged me as the culprit in a prank gone wrong.”

4. Picked out

This term is used to describe choosing or singling out someone or something from a group or lineup. It implies a deliberate or intentional act of identification.

  • For instance, “I picked out a new outfit for the party.”
  • In a discussion about a suspect, a witness might say, “I picked out the perpetrator from the lineup.”
  • A person sharing a shopping experience might say, “I picked out the perfect gift for my mom.”

5. Recognized

This term refers to the act of identifying someone or something based on previous knowledge or familiarity. It implies a sense of familiarity or memory.

  • For example, “I recognized my old classmate at the reunion.”
  • In a conversation about a song, someone might say, “I recognized the tune from a movie soundtrack.”
  • A person sharing a travel experience might say, “I recognized the landmarks from my previous visit.”

6. Pointed out

This phrase means to highlight or bring attention to something or someone. It is often used when someone wants to draw attention to a specific detail or person.

  • For example, during a presentation, a speaker might say, “I would like to point out the key findings of our research.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might say, “He pointed out that we missed an important aspect of the problem.”
  • A teacher might point out a student’s mistake and say, “You made an error here, can you see it?”

7. Flagged

To “flag” something means to mark or identify it as important or in need of attention. It is commonly used in digital platforms to highlight specific content or issues.

  • For instance, on an online forum, a user might flag a post as inappropriate or spam.
  • In a document review process, someone might flag a section that needs further review or revision.
  • A user might flag a comment on a social media post if it contains offensive content.

8. Nailed down

This phrase means to determine or identify something with certainty or precision. It is often used when finalizing details or making a definitive decision.

  • For example, in a negotiation, someone might say, “We need to nail down the terms of the contract before proceeding.”
  • In a planning meeting, someone might say, “Let’s nail down the date and time for the event.”
  • When solving a puzzle, someone might say, “I finally nailed down the correct answer to this riddle.”

9. Made out

To “make out” something means to recognize or identify it, especially when it is not easily distinguishable or clear.

  • For instance, in a blurry photograph, someone might say, “I can’t make out who is in the background.”
  • In a dimly lit room, someone might struggle to make out the details of an object.
  • When listening to a distant conversation, someone might strain to make out the words being spoken.

10. Pinned down

To “pin down” something means to identify or locate it with precision or accuracy. It is often used when trying to find or determine the exact details or location of something.

  • For example, when planning a trip, someone might say, “We need to pin down the exact address of our accommodation.”
  • In a detective investigation, the detective might try to pin down the suspect’s alibi.
  • In a research project, someone might say, “We need to pin down the specific source of this information.”

11. Called out

This phrase is often used when someone is publicly criticized or accused of wrongdoing. It can also mean to confront or challenge someone’s behavior or actions.

  • For example, if someone is spreading rumors, you might say, “I called them out for spreading lies.”
  • In a work setting, a manager might call out an employee for not meeting deadlines.
  • During a discussion about social issues, someone might say, “We need to call out systemic racism when we see it.”

12. Uncovered

This term refers to finding or revealing information or secrets that were previously unknown or hidden.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “I uncovered a scandalous story about corruption in the government.”
  • If someone finds evidence of cheating in a relationship, they might say, “I uncovered the truth about their infidelity.”
  • In a mystery novel, a detective might say, “After hours of investigation, I finally uncovered the identity of the killer.”

13. Determined

When someone is determined, it means they have found out or figured out something through careful analysis or investigation.

  • For example, if you solve a difficult puzzle, you might say, “I determined the solution after hours of thinking.”
  • In a crime show, a detective might say, “We determined that the suspect was at the scene of the crime based on the fingerprints.”
  • If someone figures out a riddle, they might say, “I finally determined the answer to the riddle.”

14. Sussed out

This phrase means to figure out or understand something, often through observation or deduction.

  • For instance, if you analyze a difficult situation and come to a conclusion, you might say, “I sussed out the best course of action.”
  • In a conversation about a complex problem, someone might say, “I need more time to suss out all the details.”
  • If someone understands someone else’s motives, they might say, “I sussed out their true intentions.”

15. Zeroed in on

When someone zeroes in on something, it means they are focusing or targeting it with great precision or intensity.

  • For example, if a photographer wants to capture a specific subject, they might say, “I zeroed in on the perfect shot.”
  • In a conversation about finding a solution, someone might say, “Let’s zero in on the main issue and address it directly.”
  • If a person is concentrating on a task, they might say, “I’m zeroing in on finishing this project before the deadline.”

16. Fixed on

When someone is “fixed on” something, it means they are intensely focused or concentrated on it. The phrase implies a strong level of attention or concentration.

  • For example, “She was fixed on the television screen, not even noticing when I entered the room.”
  • In a discussion about a challenging task, someone might say, “You need to be fixed on the goal and not get distracted.”
  • A person describing a mesmerizing performance might comment, “The audience was fixed on the dancer’s every move.”

17. Marked

To “mark” something means to identify or designate it in a specific way. The term implies making a clear distinction or indicating a particular characteristic.

  • For instance, “The box was marked with a red label to indicate its fragility.”
  • In a conversation about a suspect, a police officer might say, “He matches the marked description of the perpetrator.”
  • A teacher might mark a student’s paper with a grade to indicate their performance.

18. Labeled

To “label” something means to tag or categorize it with a specific name or description. The term implies assigning a clear identification or classification.

  • For example, “The boxes in the storage room were labeled with their contents.”
  • In a discussion about food allergies, someone might say, “All packaged foods are required to be labeled with potential allergens.”
  • A person organizing a library might label the shelves with different genres or authors.
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19. Named

To “name” something means to call or refer to it by a specific title or designation. The term implies giving something an official or recognized identity.

  • For instance, “The baby was named after her grandmother.”
  • In a conversation about a new invention, someone might ask, “What will it be named?”
  • A person discussing famous landmarks might say, “The Eiffel Tower is named after its engineer, Gustave Eiffel.”

20. Found out

To “find out” something means to discover or learn about it, often through investigation or inquiry. The term implies gaining knowledge or information about a particular subject.

  • For example, “I found out that my favorite band is coming to town.”
  • In a discussion about a secret, someone might say, “I accidentally found out about the surprise party.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might comment, “I found out that I have a long-lost sibling through a DNA test.”

21. Discovered

To find or uncover something that was previously unknown or hidden. “Discovered” is often used to describe the act of identifying or coming across something new or interesting.

  • For example, a scientist might say, “We discovered a new species of bird in the rainforest.”
  • A person exploring a new city might exclaim, “I discovered this amazing coffee shop down the street.”
  • In a conversation about history, someone might mention, “Archaeologists recently discovered ancient ruins in the desert.”

22. Pinpointed

To precisely identify or determine the exact location or source of something. “Pinpointed” is commonly used to describe the act of identifying something with great accuracy or specificity.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “We have pinpointed the suspect’s whereabouts.”
  • In a discussion about a crime scene, someone might mention, “Forensic experts were able to pinpoint the exact time of death.”
  • A person searching for a lost item might say, “I finally pinpointed the location of my car keys.”

23. Singled out

To choose or identify someone or something from a group or crowd. “Singled out” is often used to describe the act of identifying or highlighting a particular individual or item.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I singled out the student who had the correct answer.”
  • In a team sport, a coach might say, “The coach singled out the player for their exceptional performance.”
  • A person discussing a social event might mention, “She was singled out for her unique fashion sense.”

24. Made aware

To bring someone’s attention to something or provide information about a particular topic. “Made aware” is commonly used to describe the act of informing or alerting someone about a specific situation or knowledge.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I made her aware of the party happening tonight.”
  • In a discussion about a new company policy, someone might mention, “Employees were made aware of the changes through a company-wide email.”
  • A person warning others might say, “I made the public aware of the potential dangers of the product.”

25. Dug up

To discover or find something that was previously buried or hidden. “Dug up” is often used to describe the act of uncovering or revealing something that was not easily accessible or known.

  • For example, an archaeologist might say, “We dug up ancient artifacts from the excavation site.”
  • In a conversation about family history, someone might mention, “I dug up old photo albums and found pictures of my ancestors.”
  • A person researching a topic might say, “I dug up some interesting facts about the author’s life.”

26. Exposed

To expose something means to reveal or make something known that was previously hidden or secret. In the context of identifying something or someone, “exposed” implies that the true nature or identity has been brought to light.

  • For example, “The investigation exposed the identity of the thief.”
  • In a discussion about a scandal, someone might say, “The leaked documents exposed the corruption within the company.”
  • A journalist might write, “The article exposed the truth behind the politician’s lies.”

27. Picked up on

To pick up on something means to notice or become aware of something. In the context of identification, “picked up on” suggests that someone has recognized or detected something or someone.

  • For instance, “I picked up on the subtle hints and realized she was lying.”
  • If someone notices a hidden message in a book, they might say, “I picked up on the hidden symbolism.”
  • In a conversation about body language, someone might mention, “I picked up on the signs of nervousness.”

28. Pointed to

To point to something means to highlight or indicate its presence or significance. In terms of identification, “pointed to” suggests that something or someone has been indicated or suggested as the answer or solution.

  • For example, “All the evidence pointed to him as the culprit.”
  • In a discussion about a crime investigation, someone might say, “The fingerprints pointed to a different suspect.”
  • If someone suggests a possible solution, they might say, “All signs point to this being the correct answer.”

29. Laid eyes on

To lay eyes on something or someone means to see or observe them. In the context of identification, “laid eyes on” implies that someone has visually recognized or seen something or someone.

  • For instance, “I finally laid eyes on the famous painting.”
  • If someone sees a celebrity in person, they might say, “I laid eyes on my favorite actor.”
  • In a conversation about a missing person, someone might mention, “I haven’t laid eyes on her in weeks.”

30. Brought to light

To bring something to light means to reveal or make something known that was previously hidden or unknown. In terms of identification, “brought to light” suggests that something or someone has been revealed or discovered.

  • For example, “The investigation brought to light new evidence.”
  • In a discussion about a historical discovery, someone might say, “The excavation brought to light ancient artifacts.”
  • If someone reveals a secret, they might say, “I brought to light the truth about what really happened.”

31. Laid bare

This phrase means to reveal or make something known or evident. It often implies uncovering something that was previously hidden or secret.

  • For example, “The scandal laid bare the corruption within the company.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might comment, “The truth needs to be laid bare for everyone to see.”
  • A journalist might write, “The investigation has laid bare the extent of the politician’s misconduct.”

32. Brought into focus

This phrase means to make something clearer or more understandable. It can refer to gaining a clearer understanding of a situation or concept.

  • For instance, “The new evidence brought the truth into focus.”
  • In a conversation about a complex issue, someone might say, “We need to bring the key points into focus to find a solution.”
  • A teacher might explain, “The class discussion helped bring the topic into focus for the students.”

33. Made clear

This phrase means to make something obvious or apparent. It implies removing any confusion or ambiguity.

  • For example, “The instructions made it clear how to assemble the furniture.”
  • In a disagreement, someone might say, “Let me make my position clear.”
  • A presenter might state, “The data presented today will make the benefits of the new product clear.”

34. Brought to the surface

This phrase means to bring something hidden or concealed to the forefront. It often refers to revealing something that was previously unknown or hidden.

  • For instance, “The investigation brought the truth to the surface.”
  • In a discussion about a secret, someone might say, “The truth always finds a way to be brought to the surface.”
  • A detective might explain, “We need to gather evidence to bring the facts to the surface.”

35. Brought to the forefront

This phrase means to bring something to the attention or focus of others. It often implies giving prominence or importance to a particular issue or topic.

  • For example, “The new report brought the issue of climate change to the forefront of public discussion.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s bring the main points to the forefront of the agenda.”
  • A leader might emphasize, “We need to bring diversity and inclusion to the forefront of our organization.”

36. Brought to the attention

This phrase means to bring something to someone’s notice or make them aware of something. It is often used to draw attention to an important or significant matter.

  • For example, “The report brought to the attention of the board highlighted the company’s financial struggles.”
  • In a news article, a journalist might write, “The recent scandal has brought to the attention of the public the need for stricter regulations.”
  • A teacher might say, “I want to bring to your attention the importance of completing your assignments on time.”

37. Brought to the notice

This phrase means to make someone aware of something or bring something to their attention. It is often used in formal or official contexts.

  • For instance, “The manager brought to the notice of the employees the new company policy.”
  • In a legal document, it might state, “Any violations brought to the notice of the authorities will be dealt with accordingly.”
  • A supervisor might say, “Please bring to my notice any issues or concerns you have regarding the project.”

38. Brought to the fore

This phrase means to bring something or someone into prominence or make them more noticeable. It is often used to emphasize the importance or significance of something.

  • For example, “The recent incident has brought to the fore the need for better security measures.”
  • In a political debate, a candidate might say, “We need to bring the issues of healthcare and education to the fore.”
  • A journalist might write, “The documentary has brought to the fore the struggles faced by marginalized communities.”

39. Brought to the public eye

This phrase means to make something known or bring something into the public’s awareness. It is often used when referring to a previously unknown or hidden information or issue.

  • For instance, “The whistleblower’s testimony brought to the public eye the corruption within the government.”
  • In a documentary, a narrator might say, “The film aims to bring to the public eye the environmental impact of deforestation.”
  • A journalist might report, “The scandal has brought to the public eye the unethical practices of the company.”

40. Brought to the public attention

This phrase means to make something known or draw attention to something among the general public. It is often used to emphasize the significance or importance of an issue.

  • For example, “The campaign aims to bring to the public attention the importance of mental health.”
  • In a press conference, a spokesperson might say, “We want to bring to the public attention the alarming increase in crime rates.”
  • A social media post might read, “Please share this post to bring to the public attention the plight of endangered species.”

41. Brought to the public notice

This phrase means to bring something to the attention or awareness of the general public. It implies that something was previously unknown or unnoticed and has now been brought to public knowledge.

  • For example, “The scandal was brought to the public notice when the news broke.”
  • In a discussion about a new discovery, someone might say, “This research needs to be brought to the public notice.”
  • A journalist might write, “The politician’s controversial statement was brought to the public notice through social media.”

42. Brought to the public fore

This phrase means to bring something to the forefront or make it the main focus of public attention. It suggests that something was previously less prominent or known and has now been given significant importance.

  • For instance, “The issue of climate change has been brought to the public fore in recent years.”
  • In a debate about social justice, someone might argue, “The importance of diversity needs to be brought to the public fore.”
  • A news article might state, “The artist’s controversial artwork has been brought to the public fore and sparked a heated discussion.”

43. Brought to the public forefront

This phrase means to bring something to the forefront or make it the main focus of public attention. It implies that something was previously less prominent or known and has now been given significant importance.

  • For example, “The issue of mental health has been brought to the public forefront in recent years.”
  • In a discussion about gender equality, someone might say, “The importance of equal pay needs to be brought to the public forefront.”
  • A news report might mention, “The documentary has brought the issue of poverty to the public forefront.”

44. Brought to the public view

This phrase means to make something known or visible to the general public. It suggests that something was previously hidden or private and has now been shared or exposed.

  • For instance, “The leaked documents were brought to the public view by a whistleblower.”
  • In a conversation about art, someone might say, “The exhibition aims to bring new perspectives to the public view.”
  • A journalist might write, “The investigation’s findings were brought to the public view through a detailed report.”

45. Brought to the public gaze

This phrase means to make something known or visible to the general public. It implies that something was previously hidden or private and has now been shared or exposed.

  • For example, “The scandal was brought to the public gaze when it was covered by the media.”
  • In a discussion about privacy rights, someone might argue, “The government’s surveillance practices need to be brought to the public gaze.”
  • A news headline might read, “The celebrity’s secret relationship was brought to the public gaze through paparazzi photos.”

46. Brought to the public sight

This phrase refers to something that has been made known or revealed to the public.

  • For example, “The scandal was brought to the public sight when the news broke.”
  • In a discussion about a new discovery, someone might say, “This research needs to be brought to the public sight.”
  • A journalist might write, “The corruption within the company was brought to the public sight through investigative reporting.”

47. Brought to the public perception

This phrase indicates that something has been made aware to the public and is now a part of their understanding or viewpoint.

  • For instance, “The documentary brought the issue of climate change to the public perception.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial figure, someone might comment, “Their actions have brought them to the public perception as a divisive figure.”
  • A news article might state, “The politician’s scandal has brought them to the public perception as untrustworthy.”

48. Brought to the public recognition

This phrase signifies that something or someone has gained attention and acknowledgement from the public.

  • For example, “The artist’s work was brought to the public recognition after being featured in a prominent gallery.”
  • In a discussion about a breakthrough invention, someone might mention, “This technology deserves to be brought to the public recognition.”
  • A critic might write, “The actor’s performance has brought them to the public recognition as a rising star.”

49. Brought to the public acknowledgment

This phrase indicates that something has been recognized and acknowledged by the public.

  • For instance, “The charity’s efforts were brought to the public acknowledgment through widespread media coverage.”
  • In a conversation about a social issue, someone might say, “We need to bring this problem to the public acknowledgment for real change.”
  • An article might state, “The scientist’s groundbreaking research has brought them to the public acknowledgment as a leading expert in their field.”

50. Brought to the public awareness

This phrase refers to something that has been made known or revealed to the public, increasing their awareness of it.

  • For example, “The campaign aims to bring the issue of mental health to the public awareness.”
  • In a discussion about a social movement, someone might comment, “This protest is bringing the cause to the public awareness.”
  • A news report might state, “The documentary has brought the issue of poverty to the public awareness.”

51. Brought to the public consciousness

This phrase means to bring something to the attention or knowledge of the general public. It implies that something was not widely known or understood before.

  • For example, a news article might say, “The documentary brought the issue of climate change to the public consciousness.”
  • A social media campaign could aim to “bring awareness to mental health issues and bring them to the public consciousness.”
  • A celebrity speaking out on a cause might say, “I want to use my platform to bring important issues to the public consciousness.”

52. Brought to the public understanding

This phrase means to make something clear or comprehensible to the general public. It suggests that there was confusion or lack of knowledge before.

  • For instance, a scientist might give a lecture to “bring the complexities of astrophysics to the public understanding.”
  • A teacher might explain a difficult concept in a way that “brings it to the public understanding.”
  • A government official might hold a press conference to “bring the details of a new policy to the public understanding.”
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53. Brought to the public realization

This phrase means to make the general public aware of something, often something important or significant. It implies that the public was previously unaware or uninformed.

  • For example, a documentary might “bring to the public realization the extent of poverty in the country.”
  • A news report might “bring to the public realization the dangers of a new disease outbreak.”
  • An awareness campaign could “bring to the public realization the importance of recycling and reducing waste.”

54. Made a positive ID

This phrase refers to the act of positively identifying someone or something. It suggests that there was uncertainty or doubt before.

  • For instance, a detective might “make a positive ID on the suspect based on fingerprint evidence.”
  • A witness in a court case might “make a positive ID of the defendant as the person they saw at the scene of the crime.”
  • A security officer might “make a positive ID on a visitor by checking their identification documents.”

55. Made the connection

This phrase means to establish a connection or relationship between two or more things. It implies that the connection was not previously recognized or understood.

  • For example, a scientist might “make the connection between a certain gene and a specific disease.”
  • A detective might “make the connection between two seemingly unrelated crimes based on similar patterns.”
  • A researcher might “make the connection between two historical events that had previously been overlooked.”

56. Spotted the culprit

This phrase is often used to describe the act of recognizing or discovering the person who is responsible for a particular action or wrongdoing.

  • For example, a detective might say, “I spotted the culprit in the security footage.”
  • In a conversation about a crime, someone might say, “I think I spotted the culprit at the scene of the crime.”
  • A witness might claim, “I spotted the culprit running away from the scene.”

57. Detected

This term is used to indicate the act of finding or recognizing something or someone, often in the context of identifying a person or object.

  • For instance, a scientist might say, “I detected the presence of a specific chemical in the sample.”
  • In a discussion about security systems, someone might say, “The motion sensors detected movement in the area.”
  • A person might claim, “I detected a hint of sarcasm in his tone of voice.”

58. Unveiled

This word is often used to describe the act of revealing or making something known, particularly when it comes to identifying or exposing a person or information.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “The article unveiled the identity of the anonymous whistleblower.”
  • In a press conference, a company executive might announce, “We are proud to unveil our latest product.”
  • A magician might say, “And now, I will unveil the secret behind this trick.”

59. Revealed

This term is commonly used to describe the act of disclosing or making something known, often in the context of identifying or exposing a person or information.

  • For instance, a document might be described as “revealing classified information.”
  • In a reality TV show, a contestant might say, “I revealed my true feelings during the emotional conversation.”
  • A journalist might write, “The investigation revealed new evidence in the case.”

60. Pointed the finger at

This phrase is often used to describe the act of accusing or blaming someone for a particular action or wrongdoing.

  • For example, a witness might say, “I pointed the finger at the suspect in the police lineup.”
  • In a discussion about a scandal, someone might say, “They pointed the finger at the CEO for the company’s financial troubles.”
  • A person might claim, “She pointed the finger at me, but I had nothing to do with it.”

61. Made the discovery

This phrase is used to describe the act of finding or uncovering something for the first time.

  • For example, “After years of research, scientists made the discovery of a new species.”
  • A journalist might write, “The detective made the discovery of a hidden clue that cracked the case.”
  • In a conversation about historical artifacts, someone might say, “Archaeologists made the discovery of a lost city in the jungle.”

62. Pinned

This term is used when someone has successfully identified or figured out something.

  • For instance, “After hours of brainstorming, she finally pinned the solution to the problem.”
  • In a discussion about a mystery novel, someone might say, “I couldn’t stop reading until I pinned the identity of the killer.”
  • A detective might say, “I pinned the suspect as the main culprit based on the evidence.”

63. Located

This word is used to describe the act of finding the specific location of something.

  • For example, “After hours of searching, they finally located the missing keys.”
  • In a conversation about a lost pet, someone might say, “We located the dog in a nearby park.”
  • A hiker might say, “With the help of a map, we located the hidden waterfall.”

64. Found

This term is used when someone has discovered or come across something.

  • For instance, “While cleaning the attic, she found a box of old photographs.”
  • In a discussion about a rare book, someone might say, “I found a first edition copy at a flea market.”
  • A treasure hunter might say, “After years of searching, I finally found the buried treasure.”

65. Distinguished

This word is used when someone has recognized or identified something.

  • For example, “The expert distinguished the original painting from the forgery.”
  • In a conversation about different bird species, someone might say, “It can be difficult to distinguish between similar-looking birds.”
  • A detective might say, “I distinguished the suspect based on their unique tattoo.”

66. Acknowledged

To acknowledge something means to recognize or accept its existence or validity. In slang terms, it can refer to someone being identified or noticed.

  • For example, in a meeting, someone might say, “I acknowledge that we have a lot of work to do.”
  • In a conversation about a missing person, someone might say, “The police have acknowledged that they are actively searching for the individual.”
  • In a military context, a soldier might report, “Enemy troops have been acknowledged in sector B.”

67. Noted

To note something means to pay attention to it or take it into account. In slang, it can refer to someone being identified or recognized.

  • For instance, if someone gives a suggestion in a meeting, the leader might say, “Noted, we will consider that.”
  • In a discussion about a suspicious person, someone might say, “The security team has noted the individual’s presence.”
  • When a teacher receives a student’s late assignment, they might say, “Noted, but there will be a penalty for the late submission.”

68. Unearthed

To unearth something means to uncover or discover it. In slang, it can refer to someone being identified or found.

  • For example, in a crime investigation, a detective might say, “We have unearthed new evidence that could lead to a breakthrough.”
  • In a conversation about a lost item, someone might say, “I finally unearthed my missing keys in the couch cushions.”
  • When discussing a historical artifact, a historian might say, “Archaeologists recently unearthed a rare artifact from ancient civilization.”

69. Diagnosed

To diagnose something means to identify or determine the nature of a problem or condition. In slang, it can refer to someone being identified or recognized.

  • For instance, in a medical context, a doctor might say, “I have diagnosed the patient with a mild case of flu.”
  • In a discussion about a car issue, a mechanic might say, “I diagnosed the problem as a faulty alternator.”
  • When talking about a difficult situation, someone might say, “I diagnosed the issue as a lack of communication within the team.”

70. Picked up

To pick up something means to detect or notice it. In slang, it can refer to someone being identified or recognized.

  • For example, in a surveillance operation, an agent might say, “We have picked up suspicious activity in the area.”
  • In a conversation about a hidden message, someone might say, “I picked up on the subtle hint in their words.”
  • When discussing a change in behavior, a friend might say, “I picked up on the fact that something was bothering them.”

71. Sussed

To “suss” something means to figure it out or understand it, often through careful observation or deduction.

  • For example, if someone is trying to solve a difficult puzzle, they might say, “I finally sussed it out!”
  • In a conversation about a complex problem, one person might ask, “Have you sussed out a solution yet?”
  • A detective in a crime novel might say, “I sussed out the culprit before anyone else.”

72. Checked out

When something is “checked out,” it means it has been confirmed or verified as true or accurate.

  • For instance, if someone is telling a story and wants to make sure their facts are correct, they might say, “I checked it out and it’s true!”
  • In a discussion about a news article, someone might comment, “I checked out the sources and they seem reliable.”
  • A person might say, “I heard a rumor, but I haven’t had a chance to check it out yet.”