Top 48 Slang For Impair – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing the concept of impairment in a more casual and relatable manner, slang terms come to the rescue. Whether it’s describing a wild night out or a clumsy moment, our team has gathered a list of the most popular and trendy ways to say “impair”. Get ready to expand your vocabulary and impress your friends with these hip and modern expressions!

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1. Hamstrung

This term is often used to describe a situation where someone or something is prevented from functioning or achieving their full potential.

  • For example, “Due to budget cuts, the team was hamstrung in their efforts to complete the project.”
  • In a political context, one might say, “The new legislation has hamstrung the ability of small businesses to grow.”
  • A sports commentator might note, “The team’s star player was hamstrung by a nagging injury throughout the season.”

2. Hobbled

This term refers to a situation where someone or something is hindered or slowed down in their actions or progress.

  • For instance, “The company’s growth was hobbled by a lack of funding.”
  • In a discussion about personal goals, one might say, “I feel like I’ve been hobbled by self-doubt.”
  • A person recovering from an injury might explain, “My sprained ankle has hobbled my ability to exercise.”

3. Handicapped

This term is used to describe individuals who have a physical or mental impairment that limits their abilities or functioning.

  • For example, “The building has ramps and elevators to accommodate handicapped individuals.”
  • In a conversation about inclusivity, one might say, “We need to ensure our society is accessible to all, including the handicapped.”
  • A person discussing workplace accommodations might note, “Employers are legally required to make reasonable accommodations for handicapped employees.”

4. Crippled

This term is often used metaphorically to describe something or someone that is severely impaired or damaged.

  • For instance, “The economy was crippled by the financial crisis.”
  • In a discussion about a sports team’s performance, one might say, “Their star player’s injury crippled their chances of winning.”
  • A person describing a car accident might explain, “The collision left the other vehicle completely crippled.”

5. Debilitated

This term refers to a state of being weakened or made less effective, often due to illness, injury, or other factors.

  • For example, “The flu debilitated him for weeks, leaving him unable to work.”
  • In a discussion about the effects of stress, one might say, “Constant stress can debilitate both your physical and mental health.”
  • A person recovering from surgery might note, “The procedure left me debilitated for several months.”

6. Hindered

This term is used to describe a person or thing that is experiencing difficulty or facing obstacles that are preventing them from performing at their full potential.

  • For example, “I was hindered by the heavy traffic on my way to work.”
  • A student might say, “The noise in the library hindered my ability to concentrate on my studies.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “The player’s injury hindered their performance on the field.”

7. Enfeebled

This term is used to describe a person or thing that has become physically or mentally weak, often due to illness, age, or other factors.

  • For instance, “The enfeebled patient struggled to walk without assistance.”
  • A person might say, “I felt enfeebled after a long day of physical labor.”
  • In a discussion about aging, someone might comment, “As we get older, our bodies become more enfeebled and require extra care.”

8. Incapacitated

This term is used to describe a person or thing that is unable to perform normal functions or activities due to physical or mental limitations.

  • For example, “The accident left him incapacitated and unable to work.”
  • A person might say, “I was incapacitated by a severe migraine and had to cancel my plans.”
  • In a legal context, someone might say, “The court ruled that the defendant was incapacitated at the time of the crime.”

9. Disabled

This term is used to describe a person who has a physical or mental condition that significantly limits their movements, senses, or activities.

  • For instance, “The disabled student required accommodations to access the classroom.”
  • A person might say, “I have a disabled sibling, and I admire their strength and resilience.”
  • In a discussion about accessibility, someone might comment, “It’s important to create inclusive spaces for disabled individuals.”

10. Restricted

This term is used to describe a person or thing that is subject to limitations or constraints that prevent them from fully participating or functioning.

  • For example, “The restricted area was off-limits to unauthorized personnel.”
  • A person might say, “I feel restricted by the rules and regulations of my workplace.”
  • In a conversation about dieting, someone might say, “I’m on a restricted eating plan to help with my health goals.”

11. Weakened

When something is weakened, it means it has lost some of its strength or power. It can refer to physical objects or a person’s abilities.

  • For example, “After being sick for a week, I feel weakened and need to rest.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The team’s defense was weakened by injuries to key players.”
  • In a discussion about a company’s financial situation, someone might mention, “The weakened economy has had a negative impact on their profits.”

12. Stymied

When someone is stymied, it means they are facing obstacles or difficulties that prevent them from moving forward or achieving their desired outcome.

  • For instance, “I was stymied by a lack of resources and couldn’t complete the project.”
  • In a game, a player might say, “I’m stymied by my opponent’s strong defense.”
  • A student might express frustration by saying, “I’m stymied by this math problem and can’t figure out the solution.”

13. Stalled

When something is stalled, it means it has come to a stop or experienced a delay in its progress or development. It can refer to a variety of situations.

  • For example, “The negotiations between the two countries have stalled, and no agreement has been reached.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “My project car has been stalled for months due to a lack of time and resources.”
  • In a conversation about a business venture, someone might mention, “The project has been stalled due to funding issues.”

14. Slowed down

When something is slowed down, it means its speed or pace has been reduced. It can refer to physical movement, processes, or even thought processes.

  • For instance, “I slowed down my running pace to conserve energy.”
  • A chef might say, “The recipe calls for the sauce to be simmered and slowed down to develop flavors.”
  • In a discussion about decision-making, someone might mention, “I need to slow down and carefully consider the options before making a choice.”

15. Stunted

When something is stunted, it means its growth or development has been restricted or limited, often resulting in it being smaller or less developed than expected.

  • For example, “The plant’s growth was stunted due to a lack of sunlight.”
  • A child psychologist might say, “Exposure to trauma can lead to stunted emotional development.”
  • In a conversation about a person’s potential, someone might mention, “His career was stunted by a lack of opportunities for advancement.”

16. Lamed

To be “lamed” means to be physically impaired or disabled, often in the context of a leg injury or condition.

  • For example, “He fell while skiing and lamed his knee.”
  • In a conversation about sports injuries, someone might say, “A lamed leg can be a career-ending setback.”
  • Another person might comment, “I’m still recovering from a lamed ankle, but I’m getting better every day.”

17. Limping

To be “limping” means to walk with difficulty or an uneven gait due to an injury or impairment, typically affecting one leg.

  • For instance, “He sprained his ankle and is now limping.”
  • In a discussion about physical fitness, someone might say, “I have to be careful not to overexert myself, or I’ll end up limping.”
  • Another person might mention, “After a long hike, I often find myself limping for a day or two.”

18. Stricken

To be “stricken” means to be deeply affected or afflicted by something, often referring to a physical or emotional impairment.

  • For example, “She was stricken with grief after the loss of her loved one.”
  • In a conversation about illness, someone might say, “He was stricken with a severe case of the flu.”
  • Another person might comment, “The community was stricken by the devastating hurricane, but they came together to rebuild.”

19. Wounded

To be “wounded” means to be injured or harmed, typically in a physical sense, often as a result of an accident, attack, or battle.

  • For instance, “The soldier was wounded in combat and had to be airlifted to a medical facility.”
  • In a discussion about self-defense, someone might say, “Aim for the center mass to incapacitate the attacker and prevent further harm to yourself.”
  • Another person might mention, “The wounded hiker was rescued by a search and rescue team.”

20. Damaged

To be “damaged” means to be impaired or broken, often referring to a physical object or structure that has been negatively affected or compromised.

  • For example, “The car’s engine was severely damaged in the accident.”
  • In a conversation about property maintenance, someone might say, “The roof was damaged during the storm and needs immediate repairs.”
  • Another person might comment, “The antique vase was accidentally dropped and irreparably damaged.”

21. Inhibited

This term refers to the act of restraining or holding back someone or something. It implies a limitation or restriction on their actions or abilities.

  • For example, “Her fear of public speaking inhibited her from pursuing a career in sales.”
  • In a conversation about personal growth, one might say, “Don’t let your insecurities inhibit you from taking risks.”
  • A person might describe their creative process by saying, “I find that being in a calm environment helps me avoid feeling inhibited.”

22. Impeded

To impede means to obstruct or slow down the progress or movement of someone or something. It implies a hindrance or obstacle that makes it difficult to proceed.

  • For instance, “The heavy traffic impeded their journey to the airport.”
  • In a discussion about project management, one might say, “Lack of resources can impede the completion of a project.”
  • A person might describe a challenging situation by saying, “The rainy weather impeded our outdoor plans.”

23. Hampered

When something is hampered, it is hindered or restricted in its ability to function or progress. It suggests an obstacle or difficulty that limits effectiveness or efficiency.

  • For example, “The team’s performance was hampered by a lack of communication.”
  • In a conversation about personal goals, one might say, “Negative self-talk can hamper your progress.”
  • A person might describe a heavy workload by saying, “The constant interruptions hampered my productivity.”

24. Limited

To be limited means to be restricted or constrained in some way. It suggests a lack of freedom or a boundary on what is possible.

  • For instance, “His knowledge of foreign languages was limited to a few phrases.”
  • In a discussion about financial planning, one might say, “Living on a limited budget requires careful decision-making.”
  • A person might describe a job opportunity by saying, “The position has limited growth potential.”

25. Obstructed

To obstruct means to block or hinder the progress or movement of someone or something. It implies a physical or metaphorical barrier that prevents smooth functioning or advancement.

  • For example, “The fallen tree obstructed the road, causing a traffic jam.”
  • In a conversation about problem-solving, one might say, “Emotional barriers can obstruct effective communication.”
  • A person might describe a difficult relationship by saying, “Constant arguments obstructed our ability to find a resolution.”

26. Thwarted

To be thwarted means to have your plans or efforts prevented or blocked. It implies being stopped or hindered from achieving a desired outcome.

  • For example, “I had big plans for the weekend, but they were thwarted by the sudden rainstorm.”
  • In a sports context, one might say, “The opposing team’s defense thwarted every attempt to score.”
  • A person discussing a failed project might say, “Our efforts were thwarted by a lack of funding.”

27. Crutch

A crutch is something or someone that serves as a support or reliance, often in a negative or unhealthy way. It can refer to a physical object used for support or a metaphorical reliance on something or someone.

  • For instance, “Alcohol became his crutch to cope with stress.”
  • A person discussing a friend’s unhealthy relationship might say, “She’s using him as a crutch to avoid being alone.”
  • In a discussion about addiction, one might say, “Drugs can easily become a crutch for those seeking an escape.”

28. Hamper

To hamper means to hinder, impede, or obstruct progress or movement. It implies creating difficulties or obstacles that make it harder to accomplish something.

  • For example, “The heavy traffic hampered my ability to arrive on time.”
  • In a business context, one might say, “Budget cuts are hampering our ability to innovate.”
  • A person discussing a challenging task might say, “The lack of resources is hampering our progress.”

29. Cripple

To cripple means to cause severe impairment or disablement, often in a physical or metaphorical sense. It implies rendering someone or something unable to function properly or effectively.

  • For instance, “The accident crippled his ability to walk.”
  • In a discussion about a failing economy, one might say, “High unemployment rates can cripple a nation’s financial stability.”
  • A person discussing a setback might say, “The loss of key personnel crippled our project’s progress.”

30. Hinder

To hinder means to create obstacles or difficulties that slow down or impede progress. It implies preventing or delaying someone or something from achieving a desired outcome.

  • For example, “The lack of funding hindered the completion of the project.”
  • In a sports context, one might say, “The opposing team’s defense hindered our ability to score.”
  • A person discussing a challenging task might say, “The limited resources are hindering our progress.”

31. Inhibit

To restrict or prevent someone or something from doing or achieving something. “Inhibit” is often used to describe the action of impeding or hindering progress or performance.

  • For example, “His fear of failure inhibited him from pursuing his dreams.”
  • In a discussion about creativity, one might say, “Don’t let self-doubt inhibit your artistic expression.”
  • A coach might advise their team, “Don’t let mistakes inhibit your confidence on the field.”

32. Debilitate

To make someone or something physically or mentally weak. “Debilitate” is commonly used to describe the process of causing a significant decline in strength, energy, or effectiveness.

  • For instance, “The illness debilitated her to the point where she couldn’t get out of bed.”
  • In a conversation about the effects of stress, one might say, “Constant pressure can debilitate both the mind and body.”
  • A doctor might explain, “Chronic pain can debilitate a person’s ability to perform daily tasks.”

33. Undermine

To weaken or erode the foundation or support of something, often with the intention of causing damage or failure. “Undermine” is frequently used to describe actions that subvert or weaken a person, organization, or system.

  • For example, “The leaked information undermined the company’s reputation.”
  • In a political discussion, one might say, “False rumors can undermine public trust in elected officials.”
  • A colleague might warn, “Gossiping about coworkers can undermine team morale.”

34. Disable

To render someone or something unable to function or operate normally. “Disable” is commonly used to describe the action of causing a person or device to become ineffective or immobile.

  • For instance, “A broken leg can disable a person’s ability to walk.”
  • In a conversation about computer security, one might say, “A virus can disable your entire system.”
  • A mechanic might explain, “A faulty engine can disable a car and leave it stranded.”

35. Enfeeble

To make someone or something weak or feeble, often by reducing their strength or vitality. “Enfeeble” is often used to describe the process of causing a decline in physical or mental capabilities.

  • For example, “Age can enfeeble a person’s muscles and joints.”
  • In a discussion about addiction, one might say, “Drug abuse can enfeeble the body and mind.”
  • A fitness trainer might advise, “Regular exercise can strengthen muscles and prevent enfeeblement.”

36. Handicap

This term is often used to describe a physical or mental limitation that affects a person’s ability to perform certain tasks or activities. It can also be used as a slang term to mean being impaired or hindered in some way.

  • For example, “His knee injury was a handicap that prevented him from playing sports.”
  • In a more colloquial sense, someone might say, “I’m feeling a bit handicapped by this hangover.”
  • Another usage might be, “The lack of funding is a handicap to the success of the project.”

37. Weaken

To become less strong or powerful. It can also be used as a slang term to mean being impaired or having reduced abilities.

  • For instance, “The illness weakened her immune system.”
  • In a more casual sense, someone might say, “The lack of sleep is weakening my focus.”
  • Another usage might be, “The team’s morale was weakened after the loss.”

38. Hammered

To be extremely drunk or under the influence of alcohol. It is a slang term often used to describe a state of being impaired due to excessive drinking.

  • For example, “After a night of partying, he was completely hammered.”
  • In a more casual sense, someone might say, “I got hammered at the bar last night.”
  • Another usage might be, “She was so hammered that she couldn’t even walk straight.”

39. Wasted

To be extremely drunk or under the influence of drugs. It is a slang term often used to describe a state of being impaired due to substance abuse.

  • For instance, “He was so wasted that he couldn’t remember anything from the night before.”
  • In a more casual sense, someone might say, “Let’s go get wasted at the party.”
  • Another usage might be, “She woke up feeling completely wasted after taking drugs.”

40. Smashed

To be heavily intoxicated or under the influence of alcohol. It is a slang term often used to describe a state of being impaired due to excessive drinking.

  • For example, “He went out with his friends and got completely smashed.”
  • In a more casual sense, someone might say, “I’m going to get smashed at the concert tonight.”
  • Another usage might be, “She was so smashed that she couldn’t even remember her own name.”

41. Plastered

This slang term refers to being heavily intoxicated or drunk. It implies a state of being completely impaired due to excessive alcohol consumption.

  • For example, “After the party, he was completely plastered and couldn’t even walk straight.”
  • In a conversation about a wild night out, someone might say, “We got absolutely plastered and had a great time.”
  • A friend might warn, “Don’t drive if you’re plastered, it’s dangerous and illegal.”

42. Blitzed

To be blitzed means to be heavily intoxicated or under the influence of drugs or alcohol. It suggests a state of being completely impaired and unable to function normally.

  • For instance, “They went to the bar and got completely blitzed.”
  • In a discussion about partying, someone might say, “We got blitzed last night and ended up dancing on tables.”
  • A person might warn, “Don’t make important decisions when you’re blitzed, you’re not thinking clearly.”

43. Sloshed

Sloshed is a slang term for being drunk or intoxicated. It implies a state of being inebriated and lacking control over one’s actions.

  • For example, “They went to the pub and got sloshed.”
  • In a conversation about a night of heavy drinking, someone might say, “We got completely sloshed and don’t remember much.”
  • A friend might advise, “Drink responsibly and know your limits, you don’t want to end up sloshed.”

44. Tipsy

Tipsy refers to a state of mild intoxication, where one is slightly drunk but still able to maintain some level of control and coordination.

  • For instance, “After a few drinks, she started feeling tipsy.”
  • In a discussion about alcohol tolerance, someone might say, “I can handle being tipsy, but I try to avoid getting too drunk.”
  • A person might caution, “Don’t drive if you’re feeling tipsy, it’s not worth the risk.”

45. Buzzed

Buzzed is a term used to describe a state of mild intoxication. It suggests a light-headed or euphoric feeling resulting from the consumption of alcohol or drugs.

  • For example, “After a couple of beers, he started feeling buzzed.”
  • In a conversation about going out, someone might say, “Let’s have a few drinks and get buzzed tonight.”
  • A friend might advise, “Enjoy being buzzed, but remember to drink responsibly and stay safe.”

46. Tanked

This slang term is used to describe someone who is heavily intoxicated or drunk. It implies that the person has consumed a large amount of alcohol and is unable to function normally.

  • For example, at a party, someone might say, “After a few shots, he was completely tanked.”
  • In a conversation about a wild night out, a person might mention, “We got tanked at the club and had a blast.”
  • Another might warn, “Don’t drive if you’re tanked, it’s dangerous and illegal.”

47. Sauced

This slang term is used to describe someone who is under the influence of alcohol or drugs. It implies that the person is heavily intoxicated and their behavior may be affected.

  • For instance, at a party, someone might say, “He was completely sauced and couldn’t even walk straight.”
  • In a discussion about a night of heavy drinking, a person might mention, “We got sauced at the bar and ended up dancing on the tables.”
  • Another might advise, “Be careful not to get sauced too often, it can have negative effects on your health.”

48. Lit

This slang term is used to describe someone who is heavily intoxicated or under the influence of drugs. It implies that the person is in an altered state of mind and may be acting in an exaggerated or uninhibited manner.

  • For example, at a party, someone might say, “She’s so lit right now, dancing on the tables.”
  • In a conversation about a night of partying, a person might mention, “We got completely lit and had the time of our lives.”
  • Another might caution, “Getting too lit can lead to risky behavior, so it’s important to drink or use drugs responsibly.”
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