Top 32 Slang For Impatient – Meaning & Usage

Are you tired of waiting around and looking for the perfect slang to express your impatience? Look no further! We’ve got you covered with a list of the top slang terms for impatient individuals. From quick phrases to witty expressions, get ready to add some spice to your conversations and let your impatience shine through in style. So, buckle up and get ready to dive into this fun and relatable list!

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1. Antsy

Antsy is a slang term used to describe someone who is feeling restless or impatient. It can also imply a sense of agitation or uneasiness.

  • For example, “I’ve been waiting for the bus for 15 minutes, and I’m starting to get antsy.”
  • A person waiting in line might say, “I hate waiting. It makes me antsy.”
  • Someone who is excited for a concert might say, “I’m getting antsy waiting for the show to start.”

2. Twitchy

Twitchy refers to someone who is easily agitated or nervous. It can also imply a sense of unease or restlessness.

  • For instance, “I get twitchy when I have to speak in front of a large audience.”
  • A person who is feeling anxious might say, “I’ve been feeling really twitchy lately.”
  • Someone who is on edge might say, “I’ve been feeling twitchy all day and I don’t know why.”

3. On edge

Being on edge means feeling nervous, anxious, or tense. It can imply a heightened state of alertness or sensitivity to one’s surroundings.

  • For example, “I’ve been on edge ever since I heard about the break-in.”
  • A person who is waiting for important news might say, “I’m on edge waiting for the test results.”
  • Someone who is feeling stressed might say, “I’ve been on edge all week with work deadlines.”

4. Itchy feet

Having itchy feet means feeling restless or eager to go somewhere or do something new. It can imply a desire for change or adventure.

  • For instance, “I’ve been having itchy feet lately. I need to plan a vacation.”
  • A person who is bored with their routine might say, “I have itchy feet and I’m ready for a change.”
  • Someone who loves to travel might say, “I always have itchy feet to explore new places.”

5. Chomping at the bit

Chomping at the bit refers to someone who is eagerly or impatiently waiting to do something. It can imply a strong desire or anticipation.

  • For example, “I’ve been chomping at the bit to start my new job.”
  • A person who is excited for a concert might say, “I’m chomping at the bit to see my favorite band.”
  • Someone who is eager to try a new activity might say, “I’ve been chomping at the bit to go skydiving.”

6. Ready to blow

This phrase is used to describe someone who is on the verge of losing their temper or becoming extremely impatient. It implies that the person is ready to explode with frustration.

  • For example, “He’s been waiting for over an hour, and he’s ready to blow.”
  • In a stressful situation, someone might say, “I can’t handle this anymore, I’m ready to blow.”
  • A person feeling impatient might express, “I’ve been waiting for this all day, and I’m ready to blow if it doesn’t happen soon.”

7. On pins and needles

This phrase is used to describe a state of extreme anticipation or nervousness. It implies that the person is so eager or impatient that they feel like they are sitting on sharp pins and needles.

  • For instance, “I’m on pins and needles waiting for the test results.”
  • In a suspenseful situation, someone might say, “I can’t sit still, I’m on pins and needles.”
  • A person feeling anxious might express, “I’m on pins and needles waiting for the phone call.”

8. Tapping foot

This phrase refers to the action of repeatedly tapping one’s foot on the ground, often in a fast or impatient manner. It is a physical manifestation of impatience or frustration.

  • For example, “He was tapping his foot impatiently while waiting for the bus.”
  • In a situation where someone is annoyed, you might hear, “She tapped her foot angrily, waiting for the elevator.”
  • A person feeling impatient might express, “I can’t help but tap my foot when I have to wait for so long.”

9. Time is ticking

This phrase is used to convey a sense of urgency or impatience due to a limited amount of time remaining. It implies that time is passing quickly and the person feels the pressure to act or complete something.

  • For instance, “We need to hurry up, time is ticking.”
  • In a countdown situation, someone might say, “Tick-tock, time is ticking, we need to make a decision.”
  • A person feeling the pressure of a deadline might express, “I can’t waste any more time, time is ticking and I have to finish this.”

10. Jumpy

This term describes someone who is easily startled or reacts strongly to sudden movements or sounds. It implies a sense of nervousness or impatience.

  • For example, “She’s been on edge all day, jumpy at every noise.”
  • In a situation where someone is easily startled, you might hear, “He’s jumpy whenever someone sneaks up behind him.”
  • A person feeling nervous might express, “I’m feeling jumpy and can’t sit still, waiting for the results.”

11. Pacing like a caged tiger

This phrase describes someone who is unable to stay still due to their impatience. It implies a sense of restlessness and eagerness.

  • For example, “He was pacing like a caged tiger while waiting for the test results.”
  • In a conversation about waiting for important news, someone might say, “I can’t sit still, I’m pacing like a caged tiger.”
  • A person describing their own impatience might say, “I can’t wait any longer, I’m pacing like a caged tiger.”

12. Champing at the bit

This phrase originates from the behavior of horses that champ, or bite down on, the bit in their mouths when they are eager to start running. It is used metaphorically to describe someone who is eager and impatient to begin or do something.

  • For instance, “She was champing at the bit to start the project.”
  • In a discussion about a new opportunity, someone might say, “I’m champing at the bit to get started.”
  • A person expressing their impatience might say, “I can’t wait any longer, I’m champing at the bit.”

13. Gotta go fast

This phrase is often used to express a sense of urgency or impatience. It implies the need to move quickly or hurry up.

  • For example, “We’re running late, gotta go fast!”
  • In a conversation about a time-sensitive task, someone might say, “We only have 5 minutes left, gotta go fast.”
  • A person expressing their impatience might say, “Come on, we gotta go fast!”

14. Restless as a cat on a hot tin roof

This phrase describes someone who is extremely restless and unable to sit still or relax. It implies a high level of impatience or anxiety.

  • For instance, “He was as restless as a cat on a hot tin roof while waiting for the news.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s nervousness, one might say, “She’s been restless as a cat on a hot tin roof all day.”
  • A person describing their own impatience might say, “I can’t calm down, I’m restless as a cat on a hot tin roof.”

15. Agitated

This term refers to a state of restlessness, irritability, or impatience. It describes someone who is visibly unsettled or disturbed.

  • For example, “He seemed agitated while waiting for the meeting to start.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s mood, one might say, “She’s been agitated all day.”
  • A person expressing their impatience might say, “I’m getting agitated waiting for this to be over.”

16. Drumming fingers

This phrase refers to the act of tapping one’s fingers on a surface, usually in a rhythmic or repetitive manner, as a sign of impatience or frustration.

  • For example, “She sat there drumming her fingers on the table, waiting for the waiter to bring her order.”
  • In a meeting that is running late, someone might say, “I could tell he was getting impatient because he started drumming his fingers on the armrest.”
  • If someone is waiting for a slow elevator, they might mutter, “I’m drumming my fingers here, waiting for this thing to arrive.”

17. Tense

When someone is described as “tense,” it means they are feeling restless or anxious, often due to impatience or anticipation.

  • For instance, “She was feeling tense as she waited for the test results.”
  • A person waiting for a delayed flight might say, “I’m getting really tense because I have a connecting flight to catch.”
  • If someone is waiting for a friend who is running late, they might say, “I’m getting so tense waiting for them to show up.”

18. Sprinter

A “sprinter” is a term used to describe someone who is always in a hurry and impatient to get things done quickly.

  • For example, “He’s such a sprinter, always rushing from one task to another.”
  • When someone is constantly rushing and impatient, a friend might say, “You’re such a sprinter, you need to slow down and enjoy life.”
  • If someone is known for always being in a hurry, they might be called “the office sprinter.”

19. Hurry-scurry

The term “hurry-scurry” refers to chaotic or hurried activity, often characterized by a lack of patience or organization.

  • For instance, “The office was in a hurry-scurry as everyone rushed to meet the deadline.”
  • If someone is trying to get ready quickly, they might say, “Sorry for the hurry-scurry, but I’m running late.”
  • In a crowded shopping mall during the holiday season, one might comment, “It’s a hurry-scurry of people trying to get their last-minute gifts.”

20. Aggro

The term “aggro” is slang for feeling or expressing anger or impatience, often in a confrontational or aggressive manner.

  • For example, “He’s getting aggro because the line isn’t moving.”
  • If someone is being impatient and frustrated, a friend might say, “Don’t get all aggro, we’ll get there eventually.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might accuse the other of being “too aggro” and not willing to listen.
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21. Itchy

When someone is “itchy,” it means they are feeling restless or impatient and can’t sit still. This slang term is often used to describe someone who is eager or anxious about something.

  • For example, “I’m feeling really itchy waiting for the concert to start.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m getting itchy to go on vacation. I need a break.”
  • A person waiting for their food at a restaurant might say, “I’m getting itchy. How much longer will it take?”

22. Wired

When someone is “wired,” it means they are feeling agitated or hyperactive, often due to excessive energy or excitement. This slang term can also refer to someone who is under the influence of drugs or stimulants.

  • For instance, “I had too much coffee and now I’m feeling wired.”
  • A person who can’t sit still might say, “I’m so wired right now, I need to go for a run.”
  • Someone who is feeling anxious might say, “I’m feeling really wired about the upcoming presentation.”

23. Cranky

When someone is “cranky,” it means they are feeling irritable or easily annoyed. This slang term is often used to describe someone who is in a bad mood or not feeling well.

  • For example, “I didn’t get enough sleep last night, so I’m feeling really cranky.”
  • A person who is hungry might say, “I’m getting cranky. Let’s find something to eat.”
  • Someone who is stressed might say, “I’ve had a long day at work and I’m feeling really cranky.”

24. Restive

When someone is “restive,” it means they are feeling impatient or restless, often due to being bored or dissatisfied with their current situation. This slang term can also describe someone who is resistant to being controlled or confined.

  • For instance, “I’m feeling restive waiting for the bus. It’s taking forever.”
  • A person who is tired of waiting might say, “I’m getting restive. Can we leave soon?”
  • Someone who is feeling trapped in a job might say, “I’m feeling restive. I need a change.”

25. Uneasy

When someone is “uneasy,” it means they are feeling anxious or uncomfortable. This slang term is often used to describe someone who is worried or uncertain about something.

  • For example, “I’m feeling uneasy about the upcoming test.”
  • A person who senses danger might say, “I’m feeling uneasy. Something doesn’t feel right.”
  • Someone who is unsure about a decision might say, “I’m feeling uneasy about this. I need more information.”

26. Peevish

Peevish is a term used to describe someone who is easily irritated or annoyed. It refers to a state of being easily provoked or having a short temper.

  • For example, “She’s been acting peevish all day, snapping at everyone.”
  • If someone is in a bad mood and complaining a lot, you might say, “Don’t mind him, he’s just feeling peevish.”
  • A person might describe their own mood by saying, “I woke up on the wrong side of the bed and have been feeling peevish all morning.”

27. Chafing at the bit

This phrase is used to describe someone who is impatient and eager to do something. It comes from the image of a horse that is restrained by a bit in its mouth and is eager to start running.

  • For instance, “He’s been chafing at the bit to start the project, but we’re still waiting for approval.”
  • If someone is constantly checking the time and can’t wait for something to happen, you might say, “She’s chafing at the bit, waiting for the concert to start.”
  • A person might use this phrase to express their own impatience by saying, “I’m chafing at the bit to get out of this meeting and start my weekend.”

28. Grouchy

Grouchy is a word used to describe someone who is in a bad mood or easily annoyed. It refers to a person who is irritable and often displays a negative or grumpy attitude.

  • For example, “He’s always grouchy in the morning until he has his coffee.”
  • If someone is being unpleasant and easily irritated, you might say, “Why are you so grouchy today?”
  • A person might describe their own mood by saying, “I didn’t get enough sleep last night, so I’m feeling grouchy.”

29. Pissy

Pissy is a slang term used to describe someone who is easily irritated, angry, or in a bad mood. It refers to a state of being irritable and prone to snapping at others.

  • For instance, “She’s been in a pissy mood all day, yelling at everyone for no reason.”
  • If someone is being rude and easily angered, you might say, “Why are you being so pissy?”
  • A person might describe their own mood by saying, “I’m feeling pissy because I didn’t get enough sleep last night.”

30. Tetchy

Tetchy is a word used to describe someone who is easily annoyed or irritable. It refers to a state of being touchy or sensitive, often reacting strongly to small annoyances.

  • For example, “He’s been tetchy all day, getting upset over the smallest things.”
  • If someone is easily irritated and reacts strongly to minor inconveniences, you might say, “Don’t say anything to him right now, he’s feeling tetchy.”
  • A person might describe their own mood by saying, “I’m feeling tetchy because I haven’t eaten all day.”

31. Wound up

To be “wound up” means to be feeling anxious, agitated, or restless. It refers to a state of heightened tension or excitement.

  • For example, “I’ve been waiting for my test results all day, and I’m starting to get really wound up.”
  • In a conversation about a stressful situation, someone might say, “I can’t handle all this pressure, it’s making me wound up.”
  • A person might describe their friend as being “constantly wound up” due to their high-stress job.
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32. Zippy

“Zippy” is a slang term used to describe something or someone that is energetic, fast, or quick. It often implies a sense of speed or efficiency.

  • For instance, “I need to find a zippy way to get this project done before the deadline.”
  • In a conversation about a car, someone might say, “That sports car looks really zippy.”
  • A person might describe their friend as being “always zippy” because they are constantly on the go and full of energy.