Top 36 Slang For In The Future – Meaning & Usage

As we hurtle towards an ever-evolving future, so too does the language we use to describe it. Stay ahead of the curve with our list of the latest and most cutting-edge slang for in the future. From tech terms to futuristic phrases, we’ve got you covered with the trendiest lingo that will keep you in the know and ready for whatever lies ahead. Get ready to impress your friends with your future-forward vocabulary!

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1. Down the road

This phrase is used to refer to something that will happen or be resolved in the future, often implying that it may take some time.

  • For instance, if someone asks about your career plans, you might say, “I’m not sure yet, but I’ll figure it out down the road.”
  • When discussing a potential project, someone might suggest, “Let’s table this for now and revisit it down the road.”
  • A friend might offer advice by saying, “Don’t worry too much about it. Things will work out down the road.”

2. Later on

This phrase is used to indicate that something will happen or be done at a later time, without specifying exactly when.

  • For example, if someone asks you to do something and you’re busy, you might say, “I can’t do it now, but I’ll take care of it later on.”
  • When discussing plans, someone might say, “Let’s meet up later on and grab dinner.”
  • If someone is curious about your progress on a task, you might respond, “I haven’t finished it yet, but I’ll get to it later on.”

3. Coming down the pipeline

This phrase is used to describe something that is currently being worked on or planned, with the expectation that it will be completed or implemented in the future.

  • For instance, when discussing upcoming projects, someone might say, “We have some exciting new features coming down the pipeline.”
  • If someone asks about future updates, a developer might respond, “There are several improvements coming down the pipeline in the next release.”
  • When discussing potential opportunities, a manager might mention, “We have some exciting job openings coming down the pipeline.”

4. In the long run

This phrase is used to emphasize the importance or impact of something over a longer period of time, often suggesting that the true value or outcome will be seen in the future.

  • For example, when discussing the benefits of exercise, someone might say, “In the long run, regular workouts can improve your overall health.”
  • When considering different options, someone might say, “I know it’s a lot of work now, but it will pay off in the long run.”
  • If someone is hesitant about making a decision, you might reassure them by saying, “Trust me, it’s the best choice for you in the long run.”

5. In the cards

This phrase is used to indicate that something is likely or possible to happen in the future, often suggesting a positive outcome.

  • For instance, when discussing career opportunities, someone might say, “A promotion could be in the cards for you.”
  • When talking about potential relationships, a friend might say, “I think a romantic getaway is in the cards for you and your partner.”
  • If someone asks about the likelihood of success, you might respond, “With your skills and dedication, I think it’s definitely in the cards for you.”

6. In the offing

This phrase is used to describe something that is expected or likely to happen in the near future. It suggests that something is in the process of being prepared or arranged, and will be happening soon.

  • For example, “A new job opportunity is in the offing for John.”
  • A friend might say, “I heard there’s a surprise party in the offing for Sarah’s birthday.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We have a big project in the offing that will revolutionize our industry.”

7. On the horizon

This phrase is used to describe something that is expected or anticipated in the future. It suggests that something is visible or becoming visible, like an event or a change.

  • For instance, “A promotion is on the horizon for Emily.”
  • A person might say, “I can see a vacation on the horizon; I can’t wait!”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “The next big innovation is on the horizon.”

8. Down the line

This phrase is used to refer to something that will happen or be addressed at a later time. It suggests that something is expected to occur in the future, but not immediately.

  • For example, “We’ll discuss that issue down the line.”
  • A coach might say, “We have some tough games down the line, so we need to stay focused.”
  • In a conversation about career goals, someone might say, “I have some big plans down the line, but I need to gain more experience first.”

9. Up ahead

This phrase is used to refer to something that is expected or approaching in the future. It suggests that something is in the near future and will be encountered or experienced soon.

  • For instance, “There’s a rest stop up ahead if you need a break.”
  • A person might say, “I see a traffic jam up ahead; we should take a different route.”
  • In a discussion about upcoming events, someone might say, “There’s a concert up ahead that I’m really looking forward to.”

10. In the years to come

This phrase is used to refer to something that will happen or be relevant in the coming years. It suggests a longer timeframe, indicating that something will occur or be important in the future, but not necessarily immediately.

  • For example, “Advancements in technology will shape our lives in the years to come.”
  • A futurist might predict, “In the years to come, we will see major breakthroughs in renewable energy.”
  • In a conversation about personal goals, someone might say, “I want to travel the world in the years to come.”

11. Further down the line

This phrase is used to refer to something that will happen or be addressed in the future, but not immediately.

  • For example, “We’ll discuss that further down the line when we have more information.”
  • In a conversation about long-term plans, someone might say, “We can think about expanding our business further down the line.”
  • When discussing potential career advancements, a person might mention, “I hope to become a manager further down the line.”

12. In the foreseeable future

This phrase is used to refer to something that is likely to happen or be possible in the near future.

  • For instance, “We expect to see significant advancements in technology in the foreseeable future.”
  • A person might say, “I plan to travel to Europe in the foreseeable future.”
  • When discussing potential changes in government policies, someone might mention, “Tax reforms are likely to be implemented in the foreseeable future.”

13. In the not too distant future

This phrase is used to refer to something that will happen or be possible in the near future, but not immediately.

  • For example, “We hope to see a cure for cancer in the not too distant future.”
  • When discussing the potential impact of climate change, someone might say, “We need to take action in the not too distant future to prevent further damage.”
  • A person might mention, “I plan to buy a house in the not too distant future.”

14. In the fullness of time

This phrase is used to refer to something that will happen or be resolved over a long period of time.

  • For instance, “In the fullness of time, justice will be served.”
  • When discussing personal growth, someone might say, “I believe that, in the fullness of time, I will achieve my goals.”
  • A person might mention, “I’m confident that, in the fullness of time, our relationship will improve.”

15. In the coming years

This phrase is used to refer to something that will happen or be possible in the near future, specifically within a few years.

  • For example, “We expect significant advancements in renewable energy in the coming years.”
  • A person might say, “I plan to start a family in the coming years.”
  • When discussing technological advancements, someone might mention, “In the coming years, we could see major breakthroughs in artificial intelligence.”

16. In the near future

This phrase refers to a time that is close or approaching. It implies that something will happen or be achieved in a relatively short period of time.

  • For example, “In the near future, we hope to see advancements in artificial intelligence.”
  • A person might say, “I plan to travel to Europe in the near future.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We are working on a new product that will be released in the near future.”

17. In the next few years

This phrase indicates a time frame within the next few years. It suggests that something will happen or change in the foreseeable future.

  • For instance, “In the next few years, we expect to see major advancements in renewable energy.”
  • A person might say, “I plan to buy a house in the next few years.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “In the next few years, we will see significant improvements in virtual reality technology.”

18. In the days to come

This phrase implies that something will happen or be achieved in the future, without specifying a specific time frame.

  • For example, “In the days to come, we hope to find a cure for cancer.”
  • A person might say, “I’m excited to see what the days to come have in store for us.”
  • In a discussion about trends, someone might say, “In the days to come, we will see a shift towards more sustainable lifestyles.”

19. In the upcoming years

This phrase suggests that something will happen or change in the years to come. It implies a future time frame without specifying a specific number of years.

  • For instance, “In the upcoming years, we anticipate significant advancements in space exploration.”
  • A person might say, “I plan to focus on my career in the upcoming years.”
  • In a discussion about education, someone might say, “In the upcoming years, we will see a shift towards online learning platforms.”

20. In the forthcoming years

This phrase indicates that something will happen or be achieved in the years ahead. It suggests a future time frame without specifying a specific number of years.

  • For example, “In the forthcoming years, we expect to see major breakthroughs in medical research.”
  • A person might say, “I’m excited to see what the forthcoming years will bring.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “In the forthcoming years, we need to take action to mitigate its effects.”

21. In the years ahead

This phrase is often used to refer to events or changes that will occur in the future, usually within a few years. It implies that something is expected or anticipated to happen in the near future.

  • For instance, a politician might say, “In the years ahead, we will focus on improving education for all.”
  • A business executive might discuss their plans by saying, “We have some exciting projects in the years ahead.”
  • A teacher might encourage their students by saying, “You have a bright future ahead of you, so keep working hard.”

22. In the time to come

This phrase is a more formal way of saying “in the future.” It refers to events or changes that will happen at some point after the present time.

  • For example, a scientist might say, “In the time to come, we hope to find a cure for cancer.”
  • A parent might advise their child by saying, “Think about your decisions and how they will affect you in the time to come.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage their audience by saying, “Believe in yourself and the great things you can achieve in the time to come.”

23. In the future

This phrase is a straightforward way of referring to events or changes that will happen after the present time.

  • For instance, a technology enthusiast might say, “In the future, we will have flying cars.”
  • A scientist might discuss their research by saying, “We are working on groundbreaking discoveries that will shape the world in the future.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “You are the future, so make the most of your education and opportunities.”

24. Ahead of the curve

This phrase means to be ahead or in advance of the current state or trend. It implies being innovative or forward-thinking in order to stay ahead of others.

  • For example, a fashion designer might say, “Our new collection is ahead of the curve, featuring unique designs that will set the trend.”
  • An entrepreneur might describe their business by saying, “We strive to be ahead of the curve in our industry by constantly innovating and adapting.”
  • A technology company might advertise their products as “ahead of the curve” to attract customers looking for the latest advancements.
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25. In the pipeline

This phrase refers to something that is currently being developed or worked on and will be completed or released in the future. It implies that the project or plan is already in motion and will be realized at a later time.

  • For instance, a movie producer might say, “We have several exciting projects in the pipeline for next year.”
  • A company executive might discuss upcoming products by saying, “We have some great innovations in the pipeline that will revolutionize the industry.”
  • A teacher might inform their students about upcoming assignments by saying, “We have some challenging projects in the pipeline, so be prepared.”

26. In the works

This phrase is used to describe something that is currently being developed or planned for the future.

  • For example, “The new iPhone model is in the works and will be released next year.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t give you all the details yet, but we have a top-secret project in the works.”
  • Someone might ask, “What’s in the works for the company’s expansion plans?”

27. Up and coming

This phrase is used to describe something or someone that is expected to become successful or popular in the future.

  • For instance, “She’s an up and coming artist who is gaining recognition in the music industry.”
  • A person might say, “I heard there’s an up and coming restaurant in town that we should try.”
  • Someone might describe a young athlete as “up and coming” if they show great potential.

28. In the wings

This phrase is used to describe something that is waiting or ready to happen in the future.

  • For example, “We have a new project in the wings that will be announced next month.”
  • A person might say, “I’m just waiting for my opportunity to shine, I’m in the wings.”
  • Someone might ask, “What plans do you have in the wings for the upcoming year?”

29. In the near term

This phrase is used to refer to something that will happen in the near future, typically within a short period of time.

  • For instance, “We have some exciting events planned in the near term.”
  • A person might say, “I’m focusing on my career goals in the near term.”
  • Someone might ask, “What are your plans in the near term for travel?”

30. On the way

This phrase is used to indicate that something is coming soon or currently in progress.

  • For example, “The new album is on the way and will be released next month.”
  • A person might say, “I’m on the way to the store, I’ll be there in a few minutes.”
  • Someone might ask, “What’s on the way for the company’s product lineup?”

31. Upcoming

This term refers to something that is going to happen soon or is scheduled to happen in the future. It is often used to describe events, products, or releases that are anticipated or expected.

  • For example, “The upcoming concert is going to be amazing!”
  • A movie enthusiast might say, “I can’t wait to see the upcoming superhero movie.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might mention, “There are many exciting upcoming advancements in artificial intelligence.”

32. Soon-to-be

This phrase is used to describe something that is going to occur or become a reality in the near future. It is often used to express anticipation or excitement about something that is on the horizon.

  • For instance, “She is soon-to-be a published author.”
  • A sports fan might say, “He is soon-to-be a professional athlete.”
  • In a conversation about career goals, someone might mention, “I am soon-to-be promoted to a managerial position.”

33. Coming down the pike

This phrase is used to indicate that something is approaching or on its way in the future. It is often used to describe upcoming events or developments that are expected or anticipated.

  • For example, “There are many exciting projects coming down the pike.”
  • A business owner might say, “We have several new products coming down the pike.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might mention, “There are many advancements in artificial intelligence coming down the pike.”

34. In the stars

This phrase suggests that something is fated or destined to occur in the future. It is often used to express the belief that certain events or outcomes are predetermined or inevitable.

  • For instance, “Their love story was written in the stars.”
  • A person discussing career aspirations might say, “Becoming a successful entrepreneur is in the stars for me.”
  • In a conversation about dreams and aspirations, someone might mention, “I believe great things are in the stars for all of us.”

35. In the wind

This phrase implies that something is expected or likely to happen in the future. It is often used to suggest that there are indications or rumors of a forthcoming event or development.

  • For example, “There are changes in the wind for the company.”
  • A political analyst might say, “There is a new policy in the wind.”
  • In a discussion about upcoming trends, someone might mention, “There is a shift in consumer preferences in the wind.”

36. In the not-too-distant future

This phrase is used to describe a time that is not far off or distant. It implies that something will happen or change in the near future, but not immediately.

  • For example, “In the not-too-distant future, we may all be driving electric cars.”
  • A person discussing technological advancements might say, “In the not-too-distant future, robots will be a common sight in households.”
  • Another might speculate, “In the not-too-distant future, virtual reality will revolutionize the way we experience entertainment.”