Top 41 Slang For Income – Meaning & Usage

In a world where language is constantly evolving, staying up-to-date with the latest slang for income is crucial. Whether you’re hustling in the gig economy or climbing the corporate ladder, knowing the lingo can give you an edge. Let us guide you through a curated list of terms that will not only keep you in the loop but also help you navigate the world of money with confidence. Get ready to level up your financial vocabulary!

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1. Dough

This term is often used to refer to cash or money in general. It can also imply a large amount of money.

  • For example, “I need to save up some dough for my vacation.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I’m trying to make more dough by taking on a side hustle.”
  • A person might boast, “I just got a big raise, so now I’m rolling in dough.”

2. Bread

This slang term is commonly used to refer to money. It originated from the phrase “earning bread,” which means making a living.

  • For example, “I need to earn some bread to pay my bills.”
  • In a conversation about job opportunities, someone might ask, “Does that position offer good bread?”
  • A person might brag, “I just landed a new job with a higher salary, so I’ll be making more bread.”

3. Benjamins

This term specifically refers to one hundred dollar bills, which feature a portrait of Benjamin Franklin.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m saving up my Benjamins for a vacation.”
  • In a discussion about wealth, a person might ask, “How many Benjamins do you have in your wallet?”
  • A person might show off their cash and say, “Look at all these Benjamins I just withdrew from the bank.”

4. Greenbacks

This slang term is used to refer to paper money, particularly U.S. dollars, which are green in color.

  • For example, “I need some greenbacks to pay for dinner.”
  • In a conversation about currency, someone might ask, “Do you have any greenbacks on you?”
  • A person might comment, “I prefer using plastic over greenbacks for most transactions.”

5. Cheddar

This term is slang for money, specifically referring to a large amount of it. It is often used to describe a substantial sum of cash or wealth.

  • For example, “He’s rolling in cheddar after winning the lottery.”
  • In a conversation about financial success, someone might say, “I’m working hard to earn that cheddar.”
  • A rapper might boast, “I make it rain cheddar everywhere I go.”

6. Loot

Loot is a term used to describe money, particularly when acquired in a significant amount or through illicit means. It can also refer to valuable items or possessions.

  • For instance, “He scored a big loot from the heist.”
  • In a discussion about illegal activities, someone might say, “They’re in it for the loot.”
  • A person bragging about their wealth might say, “Check out my loot, I’m living large.”

7. Payday

Payday refers to the day when an individual receives their salary or wages. It is often associated with a sense of relief and anticipation for the arrival of income.

  • For example, “I can’t wait for payday, I need to pay my bills.”
  • In a conversation about financial planning, someone might say, “I always save a portion of my paycheck on payday.”
  • A person might celebrate payday by saying, “It’s payday, time to treat myself!”

8. Stacks

Stacks is a slang term for bundles of cash, typically referring to a large amount of money. It is often used to emphasize wealth or financial success.

  • For instance, “He’s making stacks from his successful business.”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, someone might say, “I dropped stacks on this luxury watch.”
  • A person boasting about their income might say, “I’m stacking paper, making those stacks.”

9. Scratch

Scratch is a colloquial term for money, often used to refer to cash. It can also imply the need for financial resources or the act of earning money.

  • For example, “I need some scratch to pay my rent.”
  • In a discussion about financial struggles, someone might say, “I’m trying to make some scratch to get by.”
  • A person might ask, “How much scratch do you have on you?”

10. Wages

Wages refer to the payment or compensation received by an individual in exchange for their work or services. It can be a fixed amount or based on hourly rates.

  • For example, “I worked overtime and earned double wages this week.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t wait for payday to receive my wages.”
  • In a discussion about fair pay, someone might argue, “Workers should be paid a living wage, not just minimum wages.”

11. Salary

Salary refers to the fixed amount of money paid to an employee on a regular basis, usually on a monthly or annual basis. It is often associated with professional or white-collar jobs.

  • For instance, “She earns a high salary as an executive.”
  • A person might say, “I negotiated a higher salary during the job interview.”
  • In a conversation about job satisfaction, someone might mention, “I’m happy with my salary, but I wish I had better benefits.”

12. Bucks

Bucks is a slang term for dollars. It is commonly used to refer to money in a casual or informal manner.

  • For example, “I need to save up some bucks before I can afford that vacation.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll give you 20 bucks for that used book.”
  • In a discussion about shopping, someone might mention, “I found this great deal for only 10 bucks.”

13. Cabbage

Cabbage is a slang term for cash or money. It is often used in a playful or lighthearted manner.

  • For instance, “I need to go to the ATM and withdraw some cabbage.”
  • A person might say, “I found a $20 bill in my pocket. Free cabbage!”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might mention, “I’m trying to save up some cabbage for a down payment on a house.”

14. Coin

Coin is a slang term for money. It can refer to both physical currency and general wealth or financial resources.

  • For example, “I need to earn some extra coin to afford that new gadget.”
  • A person might say, “I’m counting my coin to see if I can afford to go on vacation.”
  • In a discussion about investments, someone might mention, “He made a fortune by investing in cryptocurrency. He’s got serious coin now.”

15. Filthy rich

This term is used to describe someone who has an excessive amount of wealth. It implies that their riches are so abundant that they are considered dirty or tainted.

  • For example, “He drives a luxury car and lives in a mansion. He must be filthy rich.”
  • In a conversation about wealth, someone might say, “If I won the lottery, I would be filthy rich.”
  • A person might envy someone’s wealth and say, “I wish I could be filthy rich like them.”

16. Gravy

This slang term refers to money that is earned with little effort or difficulty. It implies that the income is flowing smoothly, just like gravy pours smoothly over food.

  • For instance, “The job requires minimal work but pays well. It’s like getting gravy.”
  • In a discussion about side hustles, someone might say, “I started selling handmade crafts online and now it’s just gravy.”
  • A person might describe a lucrative investment as “gravy” and say,“gravy” and say, “Once the business took off, the profits were gravy.”

17. Jackpot

This term is often used to describe a large amount of money won through gambling or a stroke of luck. It carries the connotation of hitting the jackpot on a slot machine.

  • For example, “She won the lottery and hit the jackpot.”
  • In a conversation about unexpected financial windfalls, someone might say, “Finding a rare collectible in the attic was like hitting the jackpot.”
  • A person might describe a successful business venture as a “jackpot” and say,“jackpot” and say, “The new product launch was a huge success. We hit the jackpot.”

18. Minted

This slang term is used to describe someone who is extremely rich or wealthy. It implies that the person has an abundance of money, similar to a mint producing money.

  • For instance, “He drives a luxury car and wears designer clothes. He’s absolutely minted.”
  • In a discussion about successful entrepreneurs, someone might say, “Elon Musk is minted from his various business ventures.”
  • A person might envy someone’s wealth and say, “I wish I could be minted like them.”

19. Nest egg

This term refers to a sum of money that has been set aside for future use, typically for retirement or emergencies. It symbolizes the idea of protecting and nurturing one’s financial security.

  • For example, “She has been diligently saving money for years and has built up a substantial nest egg.”
  • In a conversation about financial planning, someone might say, “It’s important to start saving early to have a comfortable nest egg in retirement.”
  • A person might advise others to prioritize saving and say, “Don’t touch your nest egg unless it’s absolutely necessary.”

20. Moolah

A slang term for money, typically used to refer to a large amount of cash. “Moolah” is often used in a playful or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, “I just won a thousand dollars at the casino! That’s a lot of moolah.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to save up some moolah before I can go on vacation.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might ask, “How much moolah do you make at your job?”

21. Paper

A colloquial term for money, especially paper currency. “Paper” is often used to refer to physical money rather than digital or electronic forms of payment.

  • For instance, “I need to hit the ATM and get some paper before we go out.”
  • In a discussion about financial transactions, someone might say, “I prefer to use paper for small purchases.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me some paper? I forgot my wallet.”

22. Green

A slang term for money, specifically referring to paper currency. “Green” is often used to emphasize the color of US dollar bills.

  • For example, “I worked overtime and made a lot of green this week.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I need to start saving more green.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any green on you? I need to pay for parking.”

23. Breadwinner

A term used to describe the person in a household who earns the majority of the income and supports the family financially. The “breadwinner” is typically responsible for providing for the basic needs of the family.

  • For instance, “My dad was the breadwinner in our family while my mom stayed at home with us.”
  • In a discussion about gender roles, someone might say, “Traditionally, the husband was expected to be the breadwinner.”
  • A person might ask, “Are you the breadwinner in your household?”

24. Big bucks

A phrase used to describe a significant amount of money. “Big bucks” is often used to emphasize the large sum of money involved.

  • For example, “He made big bucks from his successful business venture.”
  • In a conversation about salaries, someone might say, “I’m hoping to land a job that pays big bucks.”
  • A person might ask, “How did you earn all those big bucks?”

25. Bank

Bank is a slang term for money or cash. It is often used to refer to a large amount of money or a person’s wealth.

  • For example, “I just got my paycheck, now I’m heading to the bank.”
  • In a discussion about saving money, someone might say, “I’m trying to build up my bank.”
  • A person bragging about their wealth might say, “I’ve got bank, I can buy whatever I want.”

26. Coinage

Coinage is a slang term for money or cash. It refers to the physical coins that are used as currency.

  • For instance, “I found some loose change on the street, it’s extra coinage.”
  • In a discussion about the cost of something, someone might say, “Do you have enough coinage to cover it?”
  • A person talking about their financial situation might say, “I’m running low on coinage, I need to find a job.”

27. Dead presidents

Dead presidents is a slang term for paper money, specifically referring to the portraits of past U.S. presidents that appear on the bills.

  • For example, “I need to hit the ATM and get some dead presidents.”
  • In a conversation about paying for something, someone might say, “Do you have any dead presidents on you?”
  • A person talking about their financial goals might say, “I’m working hard to earn more dead presidents.”

28. Finances

Finances is a general term for money or one’s financial situation. It encompasses income, expenses, savings, and investments.

  • For instance, “I need to get my finances in order.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might say, “I’m trying to manage my finances better.”
  • A person talking about their financial struggles might say, “I’m having some trouble with my finances right now.”

29. Funds

Funds is a slang term for money. It is often used to refer to a specific amount of money that is available or allocated for a particular purpose.

  • For example, “I don’t have enough funds to go on vacation.”
  • In a conversation about paying for something, someone might say, “I need to check my funds before I can buy it.”
  • A person talking about their financial goals might say, “I’m saving up funds for a down payment on a house.”

30. Green stuff

This slang term refers to physical currency, particularly in the form of dollar bills. It is called “green stuff” because US dollars are predominantly green in color.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need some green stuff to pay for this pizza.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might mention, “I always make sure to carry some green stuff in case of emergencies.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me some green stuff until I get paid?”

This term refers to any form of money that is recognized by a government as a valid form of payment for goods and services. It is called “legal tender” because it is accepted by law.

  • For instance, a sign at a store might state, “We accept all major credit cards and legal tender.”
  • In a discussion about different types of currency, someone might say, “Bitcoin is not considered legal tender in most countries.”
  • A person might ask, “Is it true that a business can refuse legal tender if they want to?”

32. Pocket change

This slang term refers to a small amount of money, typically coins that are carried in one’s pocket. It is often used to describe an insignificant or trivial amount.

  • For example, a person might say, “I found some pocket change in the couch cushions.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “I have some pocket change left over after paying my bills.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me some pocket change for the parking meter?”

33. Rainy day fund

This term refers to money that is set aside for unforeseen expenses or financial emergencies. It is called a “rainy day fund” because it provides a safety net during difficult times.

  • For instance, a financial advisor might recommend, “It’s important to have a rainy day fund to cover unexpected expenses.”
  • In a discussion about personal finance, someone might say, “I’m working on building up my rainy day fund.”
  • A person might ask, “How much should I aim to save in my rainy day fund?”

34. Silver

This slang term refers to money in general. It is called “silver” because historically, coins were made of silver before the introduction of paper currency.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to earn some silver to pay my bills.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might mention, “I’m always looking for ways to make more silver.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have any silver to spare? I’m short on cash.”

35. Wealth

This refers to a large amount of money or valuable possessions. It signifies a person’s financial prosperity and abundance.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He inherited great wealth from his family.”
  • In a discussion about the richest people in the world, one might mention, “Jeff Bezos is known for his immense wealth.”
  • A financial advisor might advise, “Investing wisely can help you build wealth over time.”

36. Bread and butter

This phrase refers to the primary or main source of income that sustains a person’s livelihood. It represents the essential means of earning a living.

  • For example, someone might say, “His job as a software engineer is his bread and butter.”
  • A person discussing career choices might mention, “Finding a stable bread and butter job is important for financial security.”
  • Another might advise, “Diversifying your income streams can help reduce reliance on a single bread and butter source.”

37. C-note

This is a slang term for a one hundred dollar bill in the United States. The term “C-note” is derived from the Roman numeral “C” which represents the number 100.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I paid for the concert tickets with a couple of C-notes.”
  • In a conversation about finances, one might mention, “He always carries a few C-notes for emergencies.”
  • A person discussing luxury purchases might say, “That designer handbag costs several C-notes.”

38. Financial gain

This term refers to the positive outcome of a financial endeavor, resulting in an increase in wealth or profit. It signifies a successful outcome in terms of monetary gain.

  • For example, someone might say, “Investing in stocks can lead to financial gain.”
  • A person discussing business ventures might mention, “The company’s expansion strategy aims for long-term financial gain.”
  • Another might advise, “Seeking professional advice can help maximize your financial gain.”

39. Goldmine

This term refers to a business, investment, or opportunity that yields a substantial amount of profit or income. It signifies a valuable and potentially lucrative source of financial gain.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Real estate can be a goldmine if you invest wisely.”
  • In a discussion about successful entrepreneurs, one might mention, “She turned her passion into a goldmine.”
  • A person discussing income streams might advise, “Identify your own goldmine by leveraging your skills and expertise.”

40. Income stream

An income stream refers to the source from which a person earns money. It can be a job, investment, or any other means of generating income.

  • For example, “My main income stream is my full-time job, but I also earn money from freelance work.”
  • A person discussing different ways to make money might say, “Diversifying your income streams can provide financial security.”
  • An entrepreneur might focus on creating multiple income streams by starting multiple businesses.
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41. Cheese

In slang terms, “cheese” is a colloquial term used to refer to money. It is often used in urban settings or in hip-hop culture.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to hustle and make some cheese.”
  • A rapper might boast about their wealth by saying, “I’m stacking that cheese.”
  • A person discussing financial goals might say, “I’m working hard to save up that cheese.”