Top 50 Slang For Indictment – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to legal matters, understanding the slang and terminology can be crucial. In our latest article, we’ve gathered the top slang terms for indictment to keep you in the loop. Whether you’re a law enthusiast or just curious about the language of the courtroom, this list is sure to pique your interest and expand your legal lexicon. So, buckle up and get ready to delve into the world of indictments like never before!

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1. Collar

To be “collared” means to be arrested or taken into custody by law enforcement. It is often used in reference to a suspect being apprehended.

  • For example, a police officer might say, “We finally collared the suspect in the robbery case.”
  • In a crime show, a detective might say, “We need to collar this guy before he strikes again.”
  • A news headline might read, “Famous celebrity collar leads to shocking revelations.”

2. Pinch

The term “pinch” is another way of saying someone has been arrested or taken into custody by law enforcement.

  • For instance, a police officer might say, “We pinched the suspect in the drug bust.”
  • In a crime novel, a character might say, “I got pinched for a crime I didn’t commit.”
  • A news report might state, “Local gang members pinched in major police operation.”

3. Busted

To be “busted” means to be caught or apprehended by law enforcement, often in relation to criminal activities or illegal behavior.

  • For example, a police officer might say, “We busted the thieves red-handed.”
  • In a conversation about a failed heist, someone might say, “They got busted before they could escape.”
  • A news headline might read, “Drug ring busted in citywide raid.”

4. Cuffed

To be “cuffed” refers to being handcuffed, typically by law enforcement during an arrest or detainment.

  • For instance, a police officer might say, “We cuffed the suspect for their own safety.”
  • In a crime show, a detective might say, “Get the suspect cuffed and in the car.”
  • A news report might state, “Protesters were cuffed and taken into custody for disorderly conduct.”

5. Charged

To be “charged” means to be formally accused of a crime by law enforcement or a legal authority.

  • For example, a police officer might say, “The suspect has been charged with murder.”
  • In a courtroom drama, a lawyer might say, “My client pleads not guilty to the charges brought against them.”
  • A news headline might read, “High-profile politician charged with corruption.”

6. Booked

To be taken into police custody and charged with a crime. “Booked” refers to the process of being officially recorded in the police records.

  • For example, “He was booked for driving under the influence.”
  • In a crime TV show, a detective might say, “We finally caught the suspect and he’s booked for multiple charges.”
  • A news headline might read, “Famous actor booked on charges of assault.”

7. Nailed

To be apprehended or arrested by the authorities. “Nailed” is a slang term that conveys the idea of being caught or caught in the act.

  • For instance, “The police finally nailed the serial burglar.”
  • In a conversation about a criminal case, someone might say, “The suspect was nailed by the DNA evidence.”
  • A news report might state, “The notorious drug lord was finally nailed by an undercover operation.”

8. Roped

Similar to “nailed,” “roped” is a slang term that means to be caught or apprehended by the authorities.

  • For example, “The police roped in the suspect after a high-speed chase.”
  • In a discussion about a fugitive, someone might say, “The criminal was roped by the SWAT team.”
  • A news headline might read, “Bank robber finally roped by the FBI.”

9. Put away

To be convicted and sentenced to prison or jail. “Put away” implies being removed from society and incarcerated.

  • For instance, “The judge put away the murderer for life.”
  • In a conversation about a notorious criminal, someone might say, “He deserves to be put away for his crimes.”
  • A news report might state, “The drug lord was finally put away after a lengthy trial.”

10. Locked up

To be confined in a prison or jail. “Locked up” refers to the act of being physically locked behind bars.

  • For example, “He was locked up for his involvement in the robbery.”
  • In a discussion about the consequences of criminal acts, someone might say, “If you break the law, you’ll end up locked up.”
  • A news headline might read, “Gang leader locked up for racketeering charges.”

11. Sent up the river

This slang phrase refers to being convicted and sentenced to serve time in prison. It originated from the idea of being sent up the river to a prison facility, often located far away from the person’s home.

  • For example, “After being found guilty of multiple charges, the defendant was sent up the river for 10 years.”
  • In a discussion about crime and punishment, someone might say, “If he keeps breaking the law, he’ll eventually be sent up the river.”
  • A character in a crime novel might say, “I spent 5 years up the river, but now I’m a changed man.”

12. Slapped with a charge

This slang phrase refers to being formally charged with a criminal offense. It implies that the accusation was sudden and unexpected, as if someone was physically slapped with a charge.

  • For instance, “The suspect was slapped with a charge of assault and battery.”
  • In a news report about a high-profile case, the anchor might say, “The celebrity has been slapped with a charge of tax evasion.”
  • A defense attorney might argue, “My client should not be slapped with a charge without sufficient evidence.”

13. Thrown in the slammer

This slang phrase refers to being arrested and incarcerated. “Slammer” is a colloquial term for a prison or jail facility, and “thrown in” implies a sudden and forceful action.

  • For example, “The notorious criminal was finally caught and thrown in the slammer.”
  • In a discussion about crime rates, someone might say, “We need stricter laws to keep repeat offenders from being thrown in the slammer.”
  • A character in a crime movie might say, “I’d rather die than be thrown in the slammer.”

14. Hauled in

This slang phrase refers to being apprehended and taken into custody by law enforcement. “Hauled in” implies a forceful action, as if someone is being forcefully pulled or dragged into a police station or jail.

  • For instance, “The suspect was hauled in for questioning.”
  • In a news report about a major drug bust, the reporter might say, “Several individuals were hauled in by the police.”
  • A witness to a crime might say, “I saw the suspect being hauled in by the police.”

15. Run in

This slang phrase refers to having an encounter or interaction with law enforcement, often resulting in being questioned or detained. It implies an unexpected and potentially negative experience.

  • For example, “He had a run in with the police after being caught speeding.”
  • In a discussion about racial profiling, someone might say, “People of color are more likely to have a run in with the police.”
  • A character in a crime TV show might say, “I’ve had my fair share of run-ins with the law, but I’ve learned my lesson.”

16. Popped

This term is often used to describe someone who has been arrested or taken into custody by law enforcement. It implies a sudden and unexpected apprehension.

  • For example, “The suspect was popped by the police during a routine traffic stop.”
  • In a crime novel, the author might write, “The detective finally popped the notorious criminal after months of investigation.”
  • A news headline might read, “Gang members popped in major drug bust.”

17. Picked up

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has been taken into custody or detained by law enforcement. It suggests a more casual or informal manner of arrest.

  • For instance, “The suspect was picked up by the police for questioning.”
  • In a TV show about detectives, a character might say, “We need to pick up the suspect for further interrogation.”
  • A news report might state, “The suspect was picked up in connection with the recent string of robberies.”

18. Done for

This expression implies that someone is in a very difficult or dangerous situation, often as a result of their own actions. It can suggest that the person is facing serious consequences or punishment.

  • For example, “Once the evidence is presented, he’ll be done for.”
  • In a courtroom drama, a lawyer might say, “Your client is done for if we can prove their involvement.”
  • A concerned parent might warn their child, “If you keep getting into trouble, you’ll be done for.”

19. In the hot seat

This phrase is used to describe someone who is being closely watched or investigated, often in a legal or professional context. It suggests that the person is under pressure and may face questioning or criticism.

  • For instance, “The CEO was in the hot seat during the board meeting.”
  • In a political scandal, a journalist might report, “The senator is in the hot seat over allegations of corruption.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The quarterback is in the hot seat after a series of poor performances.”

20. Under the gun

This term is used to describe someone who is facing a high level of stress or urgency, often in a difficult or challenging situation. It suggests that the person is being closely monitored and must act quickly.

  • For example, “The team is under the gun to finish the project before the deadline.”
  • In a competitive job market, a candidate might say, “I feel like I’m constantly under the gun to prove myself.”
  • A news report might state, “The government is under the gun to address the growing crisis.”

21. In the frying pan

This phrase is used to describe someone who is facing or about to face a legal indictment or charges. It implies that the person is in a difficult or dangerous situation.

  • For example, “After the evidence was presented, it was clear that the suspect was in the frying pan.”
  • In a discussion about a high-profile case, someone might comment, “The celebrity chef is definitely in the frying pan now.”
  • A news article might state, “The politician’s involvement in the scandal has landed him in the frying pan.”

22. In the fire

This phrase is used to describe someone who is in a difficult or dangerous situation, often due to their own actions. It implies that the person is facing consequences or is at risk of facing consequences.

  • For instance, “After being caught red-handed, the thief knew he was in the fire.”
  • In a conversation about a failed business venture, someone might say, “The entrepreneur’s risky decisions put him in the fire.”
  • A news headline might read, “The company’s CEO finds himself in the fire after a series of unethical practices.”

23. In the hole

This phrase is used to describe someone who is in a difficult or unfavorable situation, often due to their own actions or circumstances. It suggests that the person is in a tough spot and may struggle to get out.

  • For example, “After losing all his money gambling, he found himself in the hole.”
  • In a discussion about financial troubles, someone might say, “Being in the hole can be incredibly stressful.”
  • A person reflecting on a bad decision might admit, “I got myself in the hole by trusting the wrong people.”

24. In the pit

This phrase is used to describe someone who is facing or about to face legal consequences, such as indictment or charges. It implies that the person is in a difficult or dangerous situation.

  • For instance, “The suspect was thrown in the pit after being caught on surveillance footage.”
  • In a conversation about a corrupt organization, someone might say, “The members of the gang all ended up in the pit.”
  • A news report might state, “The notorious criminal was finally thrown in the pit after years of evading the law.”

25. In the tank

This phrase is used to describe someone who is facing or about to face legal trouble, such as indictment or charges. It suggests that the person is in a difficult or dangerous situation that may lead to consequences.

  • For example, “The suspect was arrested and thrown in the tank.”
  • In a discussion about law enforcement, someone might comment, “Once you’re in the tank, it’s hard to get out.”
  • A news headline might read, “The notorious gang leader finally ended up in the tank after a long pursuit by the police.”

26. In the well

This phrase refers to someone who is currently in jail or prison awaiting trial or sentencing. It signifies that the person is physically confined.

  • For example, “He’s been in the well for months now, waiting for his case to go to trial.”
  • In a conversation about a criminal’s whereabouts, someone might say, “Last I heard, he’s in the well.”
  • A news report might state, “The suspect was apprehended and is now in the well.”

27. In the cooler

This slang term is used to describe someone who is in prison or jail. It implies that the person is confined and unable to leave.

  • For instance, “He’s been in the cooler for a while now, serving his sentence.”
  • In a discussion about crime, someone might ask, “What’s the average sentence for someone in the cooler?”
  • A person might mention, “My cousin is currently in the cooler for drug possession.”

28. In the big house

This phrase is a euphemism for being in prison. It suggests that the person is confined in a large correctional facility.

  • For example, “He’s been in the big house for years now, serving a long sentence.”
  • In a conversation about criminal justice, someone might say, “The goal should be to rehabilitate those in the big house.”
  • A news article might report, “The notorious gang leader is back in the big house after a failed escape attempt.”

29. Behind bars

This slang term refers to someone who is in jail or prison. It signifies that the person is physically confined behind prison bars.

  • For instance, “He’s been behind bars for a while now, awaiting his trial.”
  • In a discussion about criminal punishment, someone might ask, “What’s the average time behind bars for a nonviolent offense?”
  • A person might mention, “My uncle spent several years behind bars for armed robbery.”

30. Brought up on charges

This phrase describes the act of being officially charged with a criminal offense. It implies that the person is facing legal consequences for their actions.

  • For example, “He was brought up on charges of fraud and embezzlement.”
  • In a conversation about a high-profile case, someone might say, “The celebrity was brought up on charges related to a hit-and-run accident.”
  • A news report might state, “The suspect was arrested and brought up on charges of assault and battery.”

31. Cuff

This term refers to being arrested or taken into custody by law enforcement. It is often used to describe the act of putting handcuffs on a person.

  • For example, “The suspect was cuffed and taken into custody.”
  • In a discussion about criminal justice, someone might say, “Once the evidence is gathered, the police can cuff the suspect.”
  • A news headline might read, “Famous celebrity cuffed in drug bust.”

32. Roped in

This slang phrase means to be involved or implicated in a crime or wrongdoing. It implies being caught up or “roped in” to a situation.

  • For instance, “He was roped in by his association with the criminal.”
  • In a conversation about corruption, someone might say, “Many politicians have been roped in by bribery scandals.”
  • A news report might state, “Several high-profile individuals have been roped in the ongoing investigation.”

33. Slapped with charges

This phrase refers to the act of officially charging someone with a crime or offense. It implies that charges have been filed against the person.

  • For example, “The suspect was slapped with charges of theft and assault.”
  • In a legal discussion, someone might say, “The prosecutor will present the evidence and then the defendant will be slapped with charges.”
  • A news headline might read, “CEO slapped with charges of fraud and embezzlement.”

34. Put in bracelets

This slang phrase means to be arrested or taken into custody by law enforcement. It refers to the act of putting handcuffs on a person, which are often referred to as “bracelets”.

  • For instance, “The suspect was put in bracelets and escorted to the police car.”
  • In a discussion about police procedures, someone might say, “Once the suspect is identified, they can be put in bracelets.”
  • A news report might state, “Notorious criminal finally put in bracelets after a lengthy manhunt.”

35. Tagged

This slang term means to be accused or labeled as guilty of a crime or offense. It implies being “tagged” with the responsibility or blame.

  • For example, “He was tagged as the main suspect in the robbery.”
  • In a conversation about false accusations, someone might say, “Innocent people often get tagged for crimes they didn’t commit.”
  • A news report might state, “Local gang members tagged in recent wave of violence.”

36. Jugged

When someone is “jugged,” it means they have been arrested or charged with a crime. This term is often used informally to describe the act of being taken into custody by law enforcement.

  • For example, “The suspect was jugged last night after a lengthy investigation.”
  • In a conversation about criminal activity, someone might say, “If you get caught, you’ll definitely get jugged.”
  • A news headline might read, “Local gang members jugged in major drug bust.”

37. Pinned

To be “pinned” means to be accused or caught in the act of a crime. This slang term is often used to describe situations where someone is caught red-handed or implicated in illegal activities.

  • For instance, “The police pinned the suspect to the crime scene with strong evidence.”
  • In a discussion about a robbery, someone might say, “The security cameras pinned the thief to the crime.”
  • A news report might state, “The suspect was pinned for the murder of a local business owner.”

38. Canned

When someone is “canned,” it means they have been formally charged with a crime. This slang term is often used to describe the legal process of indicting an individual and initiating criminal proceedings.

  • For example, “The district attorney canned the suspect for multiple counts of fraud.”
  • In a conversation about the justice system, someone might say, “If there’s enough evidence, they’ll definitely get canned.”
  • A news headline might read, “Corrupt politician finally canned for embezzlement.”

39. Nicked

To be “nicked” means to be arrested or caught in the act of a crime. This slang term is often used informally to describe the act of being apprehended by law enforcement.

  • For instance, “The suspect was nicked while attempting to steal a car.”
  • In a discussion about police work, someone might say, “The officers successfully nicked the suspect after a high-speed chase.”
  • A news report might state, “Famous celebrity finally nicked for tax evasion.”

40. Slapped with an indictment

To be “slapped with an indictment” means to be formally charged with a crime. This slang term emphasizes the sudden and forceful nature of being accused and legally charged.

  • For example, “The defendant was slapped with an indictment for murder in the first degree.”
  • In a conversation about legal proceedings, someone might say, “If they find enough evidence, they’ll definitely get slapped with an indictment.”
  • A news headline might read, “Prominent businessman slapped with an indictment for fraud.”

41. Collared

This term refers to someone being arrested or taken into custody by law enforcement. It is often used to describe the act of apprehending a suspect.

  • For example, a news headline might read, “Serial bank robber finally collared by police.”
  • In a crime novel, a detective might say, “We need to collar this guy before he strikes again.”
  • A police officer might report, “We collared the suspect after a high-speed chase.”

42. Grabbed

This slang term is used to describe someone being caught or apprehended by law enforcement. It implies a swift and sudden capture.

  • For instance, a news report might state, “The fugitive was finally grabbed by police in a remote cabin.”
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might say, “The suspect was grabbed just moments after the robbery.”
  • A police officer might radio, “We need backup, we’ve got a runner. We’re going to grab him on Elm Street.”

43. Bagged

This slang term is used to describe someone being captured or apprehended by law enforcement. It implies a successful capture, as if the suspect has been placed in a figurative bag.

  • For example, a news headline might read, “Notorious gang leader finally bagged by police.”
  • In a discussion about crime, someone might say, “The serial killer was finally bagged after years of evading capture.”
  • A police officer might report, “We successfully bagged the suspect without incident.”

44. Book

This term is used to describe someone being officially charged with a crime. It refers to the act of recording the charges in a police record or “booking” the suspect.

  • For instance, a news report might state, “The suspect was booked on charges of assault and robbery.”
  • In a legal drama, a lawyer might say, “My client has been wrongly booked for a crime he didn’t commit.”
  • A police officer might report, “We’re going to book the suspect on charges of drug possession.”

45. Brought to justice

This phrase is used to describe someone being held accountable for their actions through the legal system. It implies that the individual will face charges and potentially be found guilty.

  • For example, a news headline might read, “Corrupt politician finally brought to justice after years of corruption.”
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might say, “It’s important that criminals are brought to justice and face the consequences of their actions.”
  • A lawyer might argue, “Our goal is to ensure that the accused is brought to justice and receives a fair trial.”

46. Taken downtown

This phrase is slang for being arrested and taken to a police station or jail. It implies that the person is being brought in for questioning or to face legal charges.

  • For example, “The suspect was taken downtown for questioning about the robbery.”
  • In a crime novel, a detective might say, “We need to take him downtown and get him to talk.”
  • A news headline might read, “Famous celebrity taken downtown on drug charges.”

47. Hauled downtown

Similar to “taken downtown,” this phrase is slang for being arrested and brought to a police station or jail. It implies that the person is being forcefully brought in by law enforcement.

  • For instance, “The suspect was hauled downtown by the police for questioning.”
  • In a crime movie, a character might say, “They hauled him downtown and threw him in a cell.”
  • A news report might state, “Protesters were hauled downtown after refusing to disperse.”

48. Brought in

This phrase is slang for being arrested and brought to a police station or jail. It implies that the person is being brought in for questioning or to face legal charges.

  • For example, “The suspect was brought in for questioning about the crime.”
  • In a TV show about law enforcement, an officer might say, “We need to bring him in and get his statement.”
  • A news article might report, “The suspect was brought in on charges of fraud.”

49. Slapped with a rap sheet

This phrase is slang for being charged with multiple crimes and having a criminal record. It implies that the person has been caught and is now facing legal consequences.

  • For instance, “The suspect was slapped with a rap sheet containing charges of theft, assault, and drug possession.”
  • In a courtroom drama, a lawyer might say, “My client has been unfairly slapped with a rap sheet.”
  • A news headline might read, “Famous politician slapped with a rap sheet after corruption investigation.”

50. Put behind bars

This phrase is slang for being sent to prison or jail. It implies that the person has been found guilty of a crime and is now serving a sentence.

  • For example, “The convicted murderer was put behind bars for life.”
  • In a conversation about criminal justice, someone might say, “If you commit a serious crime, you should be put behind bars.”
  • A news report might state, “The notorious gang leader has finally been put behind bars after years on the run.”
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