Top 36 Slang For Indignant – Meaning & Usage

Feeling frustrated and in need of the perfect words to express your annoyance? Look no further! We’ve compiled a list of the top slang terms for feeling indignant, so you can convey your displeasure with style and flair. From sassy comebacks to witty retorts, this list has got you covered. Get ready to up your vocabulary game and let your indignation shine through!

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1. Pissed off

This phrase is used to describe someone who is extremely angry or upset about something.

  • For example, “I was so pissed off when I found out he lied to me.”
  • Another example, “She was pissed off when her boss gave the promotion to someone else.”
  • A person might say, “I’m really pissed off at how they treated me.”

2. Riled up

This phrase refers to someone who is highly annoyed or irritated, often due to a specific trigger or situation.

  • For instance, “He gets riled up whenever someone questions his authority.”
  • Another example, “The controversial topic really riled up the crowd.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t get riled up over something so trivial.”

3. Hot under the collar

When someone is hot under the collar, they are visibly angry or upset about something.

  • For example, “He was hot under the collar after being accused of stealing.”
  • Another example, “The customer was hot under the collar due to the poor service.”
  • A person might say, “I’m getting hot under the collar just thinking about it.”

4. Steamed

This term is used to describe someone who is extremely angry or upset about something.

  • For instance, “She was steamed when she found out about the betrayal.”
  • Another example, “He was steamed after receiving a parking ticket.”
  • A person might say, “I’m absolutely steamed about the way they treated me.”

5. Up in arms

When someone is up in arms, they are highly upset or outraged about a particular issue or situation.

  • For example, “The community was up in arms over the proposed construction.”
  • Another example, “People were up in arms about the unfair treatment.”
  • A person might say, “I’m up in arms about the lack of action on this matter.”

6. Seeing red

When someone is “seeing red,” it means they are extremely angry or furious about something.

  • For example, “When I found out he lied to me, I was seeing red.”
  • Another example, “Her boss’s unfair treatment made her see red.”
  • One might say, “I’m seeing red after reading that article about corruption in politics.”

7. Outraged

When someone is “outraged,” it means they are filled with anger or shock over a particular situation or event.

  • For instance, “People were outraged when they found out about the company’s unethical practices.”
  • Another example, “She was outraged by the injustice of the court’s decision.”
  • One might say, “I’m outraged that they would treat their employees that way.”

8. Livid

When someone is “livid,” it means they are extremely angry or furious about something.

  • For example, “He was livid when he saw the damage done to his car.”
  • Another example, “She was livid after being lied to by her best friend.”
  • One might say, “I’m absolutely livid at the way they handled that situation.”

9. Incensed

When someone is “incensed,” it means they are enraged or extremely angry about something.

  • For instance, “The community was incensed by the politician’s controversial statement.”
  • Another example, “He was incensed by the unfair treatment he received at work.”
  • One might say, “I am incensed by the lack of action taken on this important issue.”

10. Wrathful

When someone is “wrathful,” it means they are full of wrath or intense anger towards someone or something.

  • For example, “She gave him a wrathful glare after he insulted her.”
  • Another example, “The wrathful mob demanded justice for the victim.”
  • One might say, “I am feeling wrathful towards those who have caused harm to innocent people.”

11. Fuming

When someone is fuming, they are extremely angry or outraged about something. It implies that the person is so angry that they are almost steaming with rage.

  • For example, “I was fuming when I found out they had lied to me.”
  • A person might say, “She was fuming after receiving a parking ticket for no reason.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I was fuming when my boss took credit for my work!”

12. Seething

To seethe means to be filled with intense anger or resentment. It implies that the person’s anger is simmering just below the surface and could erupt at any moment.

  • For instance, “He was seething with rage when he found out he had been betrayed.”
  • A person might say, “I could see her seething with anger during the argument.”
  • Another might explain, “I was seething after being treated unfairly by my coworker.”

13. Vexed

When someone is vexed, they are irritated or annoyed by something. It suggests a mild form of anger or frustration.

  • For example, “I was vexed by their constant interruptions during the meeting.”
  • A person might say, “She seemed vexed by the slow service at the restaurant.”
  • Another might complain, “I’m so vexed that they canceled the event at the last minute!”

14. Aggrieved

To be aggrieved means to feel wronged or mistreated. It implies a sense of injustice or unfairness.

  • For instance, “The aggrieved party filed a lawsuit against the company.”
  • A person might say, “I felt aggrieved when my neighbor damaged my property and refused to take responsibility.”
  • Another might explain, “The aggrieved employee spoke out against the unfair working conditions.”

15. Displeased

When someone is displeased, they are not satisfied or happy with a situation. It suggests a mild form of anger or disappointment.

  • For example, “He was displeased with the quality of the product he received.”
  • A person might say, “She seemed displeased with the outcome of the meeting.”
  • Another might express, “I’m displeased that they didn’t follow through on their promises.”

16. Infuriated

When someone is infuriated, they are filled with intense anger and frustration. It often implies a sense of being provoked or deeply offended.

  • For example, “I was infuriated when my boss took credit for my work.”
  • Another example could be, “She was absolutely infuriated when she found out her partner had been lying to her.”
  • A person might say, “I was so infuriated that I couldn’t even speak.”

17. Irate

Being irate means being extremely angry or enraged. It is a strong expression of anger and often involves a visible or audible display of frustration.

  • For instance, “The customer became irate when they were told their order was delayed.”
  • Another example could be, “He was irate after finding out his car had been towed.”
  • Someone might say, “Irate doesn’t even begin to describe how angry I was in that moment.”

18. Indignant

When someone is indignant, they feel anger or annoyance in response to a perceived injustice or unfair treatment. It often involves a sense of moral outrage or righteous anger.

  • For example, “She was indignant at being accused of something she didn’t do.”
  • Another example could be, “He felt indignant when he saw the way the homeless man was being treated.”
  • A person might say, “I was indignant that they would treat me that way after all I’ve done for them.”

19. Cross

Being cross means being annoyed or irritated. It implies a mild form of anger or frustration, often in response to a specific situation or person.

  • For instance, “She was cross with her friend for canceling plans at the last minute.”
  • Another example could be, “He gets cross when people don’t follow the rules.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m feeling a bit cross after dealing with that difficult customer.”

20. Teed off

When someone is teed off, they are extremely angry or annoyed. It is a more informal and colloquial way of expressing indignation or frustration.

  • For example, “He was teed off when he found out his flight had been canceled.”
  • Another example could be, “She was teed off by the way her coworker spoke to her.”
  • A person might say, “I’m really teed off about the way they treated us.”

21. Bristling

When someone is bristling, they are showing visible signs of anger or irritation. It can be seen through their body language, such as their hair standing on end or their skin appearing to bristle like the fur of an angry animal.

  • For example, “She was bristling with anger as she confronted the rude customer.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might say, “I could see him bristling with rage.”
  • A character in a book might be described as “bristling with indignation” after being treated unfairly.
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22. Rankled

When something rankles, it continues to irritate or bother a person over time. It can be a source of ongoing resentment or anger.

  • For instance, “His rude comment rankled me for days.”
  • A person might say, “It still rankles me how she treated me at the party.”
  • A character in a movie might say, “That incident from my past still rankles me to this day.”

23. Irked

When someone is irked, they are slightly annoyed or bothered by something. It is a milder form of anger or indignation.

  • For example, “I was irked by his constant interruptions during the meeting.”
  • A person might say, “It really irks me when people don’t clean up after themselves.”
  • A character in a TV show might say, “His arrogant attitude always irks me.”

24. Enraged

When someone is enraged, they are extremely angry or filled with rage. It is a strong and intense form of indignation.

  • For instance, “He was enraged when he found out about the betrayal.”
  • A person might say, “I was absolutely enraged by their unfair treatment.”
  • A character in a play might be described as “enraged with fury” after a shocking revelation.

25. Agitated

When someone is agitated, they are either nervously or angrily disturbed. It can manifest as restlessness, fidgeting, or a visible display of irritation.

  • For example, “She was agitated by the constant noise outside her window.”
  • A person might say, “I get agitated when people are late for appointments.”
  • A character in a story might be described as “agitated and pacing back and forth” while waiting for important news.

26. Offended

When someone is offended, they feel upset or hurt by something that has been said or done. It often implies a personal feeling of being wronged or insulted.

  • For example, “I was deeply offended by his insensitive comment.”
  • Someone might say, “She took offense at his remarks about her appearance.”
  • Another might express their feelings by saying, “I can’t believe he would do something to intentionally offend me.”

27. Disgruntled

When someone is disgruntled, they are angry or dissatisfied with a situation or person. It often implies a feeling of being treated unfairly or not receiving what was expected.

  • For instance, “The disgruntled employee complained about the unfair treatment.”
  • A customer might say, “I am extremely disgruntled with the poor service I received.”
  • Another might express their dissatisfaction by saying, “The company’s lack of transparency left me feeling disgruntled.”

28. Wroth

Wroth is an old-fashioned term that means to be extremely angry or wrathful. It conveys a sense of intense anger or fury.

  • For example, “He was wroth with anger after discovering the betrayal.”
  • A person might say, “I was absolutely wroth when I found out they had lied to me.”
  • Another might use the term to describe their emotional state by saying, “I am wroth with the way they treated me.”

29. Chafed

When someone is chafed, they are irritated or annoyed by something. It often implies a feeling of frustration or discomfort.

  • For instance, “He was chafed by their constant interruptions.”
  • A person might say, “I am chafed by their lack of punctuality.”
  • Another might express their annoyance by saying, “She always finds a way to chafe me with her comments.”

30. Huffy

When someone is huffy, they are in a state of anger or annoyance. It often implies a feeling of being offended or slighted.

  • For example, “She stormed out of the room in a huffy manner.”
  • A person might say, “He gets huffy whenever someone disagrees with him.”
  • Another might describe their emotional state by saying, “I am feeling huffy after their rude remark.”

31. Out of sorts

This phrase is used to describe someone who is feeling irritable, cranky, or generally not in a good mood. It suggests a state of being out of one’s normal state of mind or emotions.

  • For example, “I don’t know what’s wrong with me today, I just feel out of sorts.”
  • Someone might say, “She’s been acting out of sorts lately, I think something’s bothering her.”
  • A person might comment, “I’m always a bit out of sorts when I haven’t had enough sleep.”

32. Touchy

This word describes someone who is easily provoked or sensitive to criticism or teasing. It suggests that the person becomes defensive or upset with little provocation.

  • For instance, “Be careful what you say around him, he’s very touchy.”
  • A person might say, “I didn’t mean to upset her, she’s just really touchy about her appearance.”
  • Someone might comment, “He’s been touchy ever since he lost his job.”

33. Testy

This word describes someone who is easily annoyed or becomes angry quickly. It suggests a state of being easily provoked or having a short fuse.

  • For example, “He’s been in a testy mood all day, I wouldn’t want to cross him.”
  • A person might say, “Try not to ask her too many questions, she’s feeling testy.”
  • Someone might comment, “I don’t know what’s gotten into him, he’s been so testy lately.”

34. Sore

This word describes someone who is angry or resentful about something. It suggests a feeling of being upset or irritated.

  • For instance, “She’s still sore about what happened last week.”
  • A person might say, “I’m a little sore that he didn’t invite me to the party.”
  • Someone might comment, “He’s always sore about losing at board games.”

35. Miffed

This word describes someone who is slightly annoyed or offended by something. It suggests a feeling of being displeased or bothered.

  • For example, “She’s a little miffed that he forgot their anniversary.”
  • A person might say, “I was miffed when they didn’t include me in the group chat.”
  • Someone might comment, “He seemed a bit miffed by the criticism he received.”

36. Put out

This phrase is used to describe someone who is annoyed or upset about a situation or someone’s actions.

  • For example, “I was really put out when my friend canceled our plans at the last minute.”
  • A person might say, “She was put out by her coworker’s constant interruptions during the meeting.”
  • In a complaint about poor service at a restaurant, someone might say, “I was put out by the waiter’s rude attitude.”