Top 52 Slang For Indignation – Meaning & Usage

Feeling peeved or outraged and need the perfect slang to express your indignation? Look no further! Our team has scoured the depths of modern language to bring you a curated list of the most fitting and trendy slang for indignation. Get ready to level up your vocabulary game and express your frustrations in style with our latest compilation.

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1. Pissed off

This phrase is used to describe someone who is very angry or upset about something.

  • For example, “I was pissed off when I found out they had lied to me.”
  • A person might say, “I’m so pissed off at my boss for giving me extra work.”
  • Another might exclaim, “He made me so pissed off with his rude comments!”

2. Livid

When someone is livid, they are extremely angry or furious about something.

  • For instance, “She was livid when she found out her car had been stolen.”
  • A person might say, “I’m livid with my friend for betraying my trust.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I was absolutely livid when I saw the mess they made!”

3. Fuming

To be fuming means to be extremely angry or enraged.

  • For example, “He was fuming after his team lost the game.”
  • A person might say, “I’m fuming with my roommate for eating my food without asking.”
  • Another might exclaim, “She made me fuming mad with her disrespectful behavior!”

4. Seething

When someone is seething, they are simmering with anger or rage.

  • For instance, “He was seething with jealousy when he saw his ex with someone else.”
  • A person might say, “I’m seething with frustration over the constant delays.”
  • Another might exclaim, “She made me seething with her constant lies!”

5. Incensed

To be incensed means to be extremely angry or outraged about something.

  • For example, “They were incensed by the unfair treatment.”
  • A person might say, “I’m incensed with the government’s lack of action.”
  • Another might exclaim, “He made me absolutely incensed with his insensitive comments!”

6. Riled up

This term refers to someone who is extremely angry or agitated. It implies a state of being worked up or provoked.

  • For example, “He got all riled up when he found out he was passed over for the promotion.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t get riled up over something so trivial.”
  • In a heated argument, one might yell, “You’re getting me all riled up!”

7. Outraged

When someone is outraged, they are experiencing a strong feeling of anger or shock in response to a perceived injustice or wrongdoing.

  • For instance, “She was outraged when she found out about the corruption.”
  • A person might say, “I am absolutely outraged by this decision.”
  • In a discussion about social issues, someone might express, “The community is outraged by the lack of action.”

8. Infuriated

This word describes a state of extreme anger or rage. It implies a level of intensity in one’s anger.

  • For example, “He was infuriated by the disrespectful comments.”
  • A person might say, “I am absolutely infuriated with their behavior.”
  • In a confrontation, one might shout, “You’re infuriating me with your lies!”

9. Wrathful

When someone is wrathful, they are filled with anger or fury. It often implies a desire for revenge or punishment.

  • For instance, “His wrathful gaze sent chills down her spine.”
  • A person might say, “Beware of his wrathful temper.”
  • In a story, a character might be described as “a wrathful villain seeking vengeance.”

10. Steamed

This term is used to describe someone who is angry or irritated. It implies a state of being heated or worked up.

  • For example, “She was steamed when she found out about the betrayal.”
  • A person might say, “I’m really steamed about the way they treated me.”
  • In a rant, one might exclaim, “I’m so steamed, I can’t even think straight!”

11. Vexed

When someone is vexed, they are feeling frustrated or annoyed by a situation or person.

  • For example, “I was vexed when my flight got delayed for the third time.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t talk to me right now, I’m too vexed to deal with it.”
  • Another might express their vexation by saying, “I can’t believe he forgot my birthday, it really vexes me.”

12. Agitated

Agitated describes a state of being disturbed or upset, often due to feeling anxious or irritated.

  • For instance, “I was so agitated when I couldn’t find my car keys.”
  • A person might say, “I get agitated when people don’t respect personal boundaries.”
  • Another might express their agitation by saying, “The constant noise outside was making me agitated.”

13. Displeased

When someone is displeased, they are not satisfied or happy with a situation or outcome.

  • For example, “I was displeased with the service at that restaurant.”
  • A person might say, “I’m really displeased with the way they handled the situation.”
  • Another might express their displeasure by saying, “He didn’t meet the deadline, and I’m very displeased about it.”

14. Rankled

Rankled means to have caused irritation or resentment in someone.

  • For instance, “His comment about my appearance really rankled me.”
  • A person might say, “It still rankles me that he never apologized.”
  • Another might express their rankled feelings by saying, “The unfair treatment rankled the entire team.”

15. Disgruntled

Disgruntled describes a state of being unhappy or dissatisfied, often due to feeling unappreciated or frustrated.

  • For example, “The employees were disgruntled with their working conditions.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling disgruntled about the lack of communication from management.”
  • Another might express their disgruntlement by saying, “The constant changes in policy have left me feeling disgruntled.”

16. Irked

This word is used to describe a feeling of irritation or frustration.

  • For example, “I was irked when my roommate ate my leftovers without asking.”
  • A person might say, “I’m irked by the constant noise from construction outside my window.”
  • Another might express, “It really irks me when people don’t clean up after themselves.”

17. Miffed

This word is used to describe a feeling of being slightly annoyed or offended.

  • For instance, “I was miffed when my friend canceled our plans at the last minute.”
  • A person might say, “I’m a bit miffed that my boss didn’t acknowledge my hard work.”
  • Another might express, “I feel miffed when people don’t respect my boundaries.”

18. Upset

This word is used to describe a feeling of being disturbed, bothered, or emotionally affected in a negative way.

  • For example, “I was upset when I found out my favorite store was closing.”
  • A person might say, “I’m really upset about the way my friend treated me.”
  • Another might express, “The news of the accident left me feeling upset.”

19. Cross

This word is used to describe a feeling of anger or annoyance.

  • For instance, “I was cross with my sister for borrowing my clothes without asking.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling cross about the way I was treated at work.”
  • Another might express, “I get cross when people are consistently late.”

20. Chafed

This word is used to describe a feeling of irritation or being rubbed the wrong way.

  • For example, “I felt chafed by his condescending remarks.”
  • A person might say, “I’m chafed by the constant interruptions during meetings.”
  • Another might express, “The lack of progress on this project is really chafing me.”

21. Teed off

This slang phrase is used to describe someone who is extremely angry or upset about something.

  • For example, “He was teed off when he found out his car had been towed.”
  • Another example, “She was teed off when her boss gave credit for her work to someone else.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m really teed off about the way they treated us.”

22. Bristling

This term is used to describe someone who is visibly showing anger or irritation.

  • For instance, “She was bristling with anger when she heard the news.”
  • Another example, “He walked into the room, bristling with frustration.”
  • Someone might say, “I could see him bristling with annoyance during the meeting.”

23. Aggrieved

This word describes the feeling of being treated unfairly or experiencing a sense of injustice.

  • For example, “The aggrieved employee filed a formal complaint against their supervisor.”
  • Another example, “She felt aggrieved by the company’s decision to pass her over for a promotion.”
  • Someone might say, “The aggrieved party demanded compensation for their losses.”

24. Hot under the collar

This slang phrase is used to describe someone who is extremely angry or irritated.

  • For instance, “He was hot under the collar when he found out he had been lied to.”
  • Another example, “She gets hot under the collar whenever someone questions her authority.”
  • Someone might say, “Don’t make me hot under the collar with your constant excuses.”

25. Aggravated

This term is used to describe someone who is annoyed or irritated by something.

  • For example, “He was aggravated by the constant noise outside his apartment.”
  • Another example, “She gets aggravated when people don’t listen to her.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m so aggravated by their lack of respect.”

26. Up in arms

To be extremely upset or angry about something.

  • For example, “The community was up in arms when they found out about the proposed development.”
  • A person might say, “I’m up in arms about the unfair treatment I received.”
  • Another example, “The fans were up in arms after their team lost the championship due to a controversial call.”

27. Offended

To feel upset or angry as a result of something that was said or done.

  • For instance, “She was deeply offended by his insensitive comment.”
  • A person might say, “I was offended by the way she treated me.”
  • Another example, “His remarks were offensive and left many people feeling offended.”

28. Piqued

To feel annoyed or irritated by something.

  • For example, “Her curiosity was piqued by the mysterious letter.”
  • A person might say, “I was piqued by his condescending tone.”
  • Another example, “His constant interruptions piqued me and I couldn’t concentrate.”

29. Irate

To be extremely angry or furious about something.

  • For instance, “The customer was irate after receiving poor service.”
  • A person might say, “I was irate when I found out I was being lied to.”
  • Another example, “His irresponsible behavior made me irate.”

30. Hopping mad

To be extremely angry or furious about something.

  • For example, “She was hopping mad when she discovered her car had been towed.”
  • A person might say, “I was hopping mad when I realized I had been cheated.”
  • Another example, “The team’s loss in the final game left the coach hopping mad.”

31. Wound up

This term refers to feeling highly irritated or frustrated.

  • For example, “I was really wound up after dealing with that rude customer.”
  • Someone might say, “Don’t get wound up over something so trivial.”
  • Another person might comment, “She always gets wound up about the smallest things.”

32. Enraged

When someone is enraged, they are filled with intense anger or fury.

  • For instance, “He was absolutely enraged when he found out he had been lied to.”
  • In a heated argument, one might shout, “You’re making me enraged with your constant interruptions!”
  • A person discussing a frustrating situation might say, “I was enraged when my boss took credit for my work.”

33. Off the deep end

This phrase refers to someone who has lost their composure or is behaving in an extreme or irrational manner.

  • For example, “She went off the deep end when she found out her partner had cheated on her.”
  • In a discussion about a person’s erratic behavior, someone might say, “He’s really gone off the deep end lately.”
  • Another person might comment, “I try to avoid situations that make me go off the deep end.”

34. Seeing red

When someone is seeing red, they are experiencing extreme anger or rage.

  • For instance, “I was seeing red after my car was vandalized.”
  • In a heated argument, one might say, “I could see him seeing red as he shouted at the top of his lungs.”
  • A person expressing frustration might comment, “Every time I think about it, I start seeing red.”

35. In a huff

When someone is in a huff, they are in a state of irritation or indignation.

  • For example, “She stormed out of the room in a huff after her idea was shot down.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s mood, one might say, “He’s been in a huff all day, I’m not sure what’s bothering him.”
  • Another person might comment, “I didn’t mean to make her go in a huff, I was just expressing my opinion.”

36. Incandescent

When someone is “incandescent” with indignation, they are extremely angry or furious. This term is often used to describe someone who is boiling with rage or outrage.

  • For example, “She was absolutely incandescent with anger when she found out about the betrayal.”
  • In a heated argument, one might say, “He was incandescent with indignation as he defended his position.”
  • A person might describe their own anger by saying, “I was so incandescent, I couldn’t even speak.”

37. Out of sorts

When someone is “out of sorts,” they are feeling irritated, unsettled, or not quite themselves. This term is often used to describe a general feeling of being off or out of balance.

  • For instance, “He’s been out of sorts ever since he lost his job.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling a bit out of sorts today. I just can’t seem to shake this bad mood.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s behavior, one might comment, “She’s been acting out of sorts lately, snapping at everyone for no reason.”

38. Fed up

When someone is “fed up,” they are exasperated or extremely frustrated with a situation or person. This term is often used to express a level of annoyance or irritation that has reached its limit.

  • For example, “I’m so fed up with all the traffic in this city.”
  • A person might say, “I’m fed up with your constant excuses. Just do what you’re supposed to do.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult relationship, one might comment, “She finally broke up with him because she was fed up with his lies.”

39. Put out

When someone is “put out,” they are annoyed or inconvenienced by something or someone. This term is often used to describe a feeling of being bothered or irritated.

  • For instance, “I was put out when he showed up late to our meeting.”
  • One might say, “She’s always asking for favors. It’s starting to put me out.”
  • In a conversation about a frustrating situation, one might comment, “I’m really put out by the lack of communication from the team.”

40. Galled

When someone is “galled,” they are offended or deeply resentful. This term is often used to describe a feeling of being insulted or provoked.

  • For example, “She was galled by his condescending remarks.”
  • A person might say, “I was galled when he took credit for my work.”
  • In a discussion about a disrespectful action, one might comment, “It galled me to see how he treated his employees.”

41. Huffy

Huffy is a slang term used to describe someone who is easily irritated or annoyed. It refers to a person who is in a bad mood or has a short temper.

  • For example, “She’s always huffy when she doesn’t get her way.”
  • When someone is being difficult, you might say, “Don’t be so huffy about it.”
  • If someone is acting grumpy, you could ask, “Why are you so huffy today?”

42. Testy

Testy is a slang term used to describe someone who is easily irritated or quick to become angry. It refers to a person who is easily provoked or annoyed.

  • For instance, “He’s been testy all day, don’t ask him any more questions.”
  • When someone is in a bad mood, you might say, “She’s feeling testy today, better give her some space.”
  • If someone snaps at you for no reason, you could say, “Wow, someone’s feeling testy.”

43. Touchy

Touchy is a slang term used to describe someone who is easily offended or sensitive. It refers to a person who reacts strongly to criticism or perceived slights.

  • For example, “Be careful what you say around him, he’s touchy about his appearance.”
  • When someone gets upset over small things, you might say, “She’s so touchy, you can’t joke around with her.”
  • If someone reacts strongly to a harmless comment, you could say, “Don’t be so touchy, I was just joking.”

44. Ireful

Ireful is a slang term used to describe someone who is extremely angry or full of rage. It refers to a person who is seething with indignation or fury.

  • For instance, “His ireful expression made everyone in the room uncomfortable.”
  • When someone is visibly angry, you might say, “Watch out, he’s in an ireful mood.”
  • If someone is fuming with anger, you could say, “She’s absolutely ireful about what happened.”

45. Wroth

Wroth is a slang term used to describe someone who is extremely angry or filled with wrath. It refers to a person who is in a state of intense indignation or fury.

  • For example, “He was wroth with his coworker for stealing credit for his work.”
  • When someone is boiling with anger, you might say, “She’s wroth with him for breaking his promise.”
  • If someone is seething with rage, you could say, “His wroth expression scared everyone in the room.”

46. Choleric

Choleric is a term used to describe someone who is easily angered or irritable. It is often used to express a person’s state of indignation or frustration.

  • For example, “She was in a choleric mood after receiving a parking ticket.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t know why he’s so choleric all the time.”
  • Another might exclaim, “His choleric outbursts are getting out of hand!”

47. Sore

Sore is a slang term used to describe someone who is upset or annoyed. It is often used to express a person’s indignation or displeasure.

  • For instance, “She was sore about not getting the promotion.”
  • A person might say, “I’m still sore about what he said to me.”
  • Another might complain, “I’m so sore about the way they treated us.”

48. Vexatious

Vexatious is a term used to describe something or someone that is annoying or frustrating. It is often used to express a person’s feelings of indignation or irritation.

  • For example, “His constant interruptions were vexatious.”
  • A person might say, “I find her behavior to be extremely vexatious.”
  • Another might comment, “The slow internet connection is so vexatious!”

49. Peeved

Peeved is a slang term used to describe someone who is irritated or annoyed. It is often used to express a person’s feelings of indignation or displeasure.

  • For instance, “He was peeved when his favorite team lost the game.”
  • A person might say, “I’m really peeved about the late delivery.”
  • Another might grumble, “I’m so peeved with the constant noise from the construction site.”

50. Insulted

Insulted is a term used to describe someone who feels offended or disrespected. It is often used to express a person’s feelings of indignation or hurt.

  • For example, “She felt insulted by his rude comment.”
  • A person might say, “I was deeply insulted by their behavior.”
  • Another might assert, “He insulted me in front of everyone, and I won’t stand for it.”

51. Disrespected

When someone is disrespected, they are treated in a way that undermines their worth or value. It can involve verbal insults, dismissive behavior, or actions that disregard their feelings or boundaries.

  • For example, if someone talks over you or ignores your opinion in a meeting, you might feel disrespected.
  • If a friend cancels plans without giving a valid reason or apology, you might say, “I feel disrespected by their lack of consideration.”
  • In a romantic relationship, if your partner consistently belittles you or disregards your boundaries, you might feel disrespected and consider ending the relationship.
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52. Indignant

When someone is indignant, they feel a strong sense of anger or annoyance at something they perceive as unfair or unjust. It is a reaction to feeling offended, slighted, or wronged.

  • For instance, if a customer receives poor service at a restaurant and is overcharged, they might feel indignant and demand a refund.
  • If a student is accused of cheating on a test they studied hard for, they might feel indignant and argue their case with the teacher.
  • In a social justice context, someone might feel indignant about systemic injustices and advocate for change.