Top 39 Slang For Infamous – Meaning & Usage

Infamous individuals often have their own unique language and way of communicating that sets them apart from the rest. Whether it’s in the world of pop culture, politics, or even true crime, understanding the slang associated with these figures can provide valuable insight into their world. Join us as we uncover the top slang for infamous personalities and delve into the fascinating linguistic nuances that define them. Get ready to expand your vocabulary and gain a whole new perspective on these larger-than-life characters!

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1. Notorious

When someone is notorious, they are widely known for something negative or infamous. It often implies that the person has a bad reputation or has committed some kind of wrongdoing.

  • For example, “Al Capone was a notorious gangster during the Prohibition era.”
  • A news headline might read, “The notorious bank robber strikes again.”
  • In a conversation about historical figures, someone might say, “Jack the Ripper is one of the most notorious serial killers in history.”

2. Infamy

Infamy refers to being well-known for something negative or dishonorable. It is often associated with a person or event that has caused harm or damage.

  • For instance, “The Watergate scandal brought infamy to Richard Nixon.”
  • In a discussion about controversial figures, someone might say, “Hitler’s infamy is still felt today.”
  • A news article might say, “The company’s actions have brought infamy to their brand.”

3. Villainous

When someone or something is described as villainous, it means they possess traits or behaviors associated with a villain. It implies that they are morally corrupt, deceitful, or harmful.

  • For example, “The villainous character in the movie was portrayed as cunning and evil.”
  • In a discussion about literature, someone might say, “Iago from Othello is one of Shakespeare’s most villainous characters.”
  • A person describing a politician might say, “His villainous actions have caused harm to the community.”

4. Disreputable

When something or someone is disreputable, it means they have a bad reputation or are not respected. It implies that they are not trustworthy or of low moral character.

  • For instance, “That disreputable company has been involved in numerous scandals.”
  • In a conversation about neighborhoods, someone might say, “That area of town is known for its disreputable establishments.”
  • A person discussing a public figure might say, “His disreputable actions have caused a loss of trust among the community.”

5. Scandalous

When something is scandalous, it means it is shocking or morally offensive, often involving scandal or controversy. It implies that the subject matter is considered inappropriate or unacceptable.

  • For example, “The scandalous affair between the politician and his assistant was widely reported.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might say, “Her scandalous outfit caused quite a stir at the event.”
  • A news headline might read, “The scandalous revelations about the company’s unethical practices.”

6. Outlawed

This term refers to something that is banned or prohibited by law. It implies that the action or item is considered criminal or against the rules.

  • For example, “The sale of drugs is outlawed in most countries.”
  • In a discussion about controversial activities, someone might say, “Gambling was outlawed in this state years ago.”
  • A person might describe a forbidden action by saying, “That behavior is outlawed in our society.”

7. Blacklisted

To be blacklisted means to be placed on a list of people or things that are not allowed or are to be avoided. It implies that the person or item has been deemed undesirable or untrustworthy.

  • For instance, “After his scandal, the actor was blacklisted from Hollywood.”
  • In a conversation about job opportunities, someone might say, “I heard that company blacklists employees who steal.”
  • A person might describe being excluded from a group by saying, “I was blacklisted from the club after causing a disturbance.”

8. Shady

This term is used to describe something or someone as being dishonest, suspicious, or untrustworthy. It implies that there is something questionable or hidden about the person or situation.

  • For example, “I don’t trust that guy, he seems really shady.”
  • In a discussion about a questionable business deal, someone might say, “The whole thing seems really shady to me.”
  • A person might describe a suspicious character by saying, “He has a shady past and I wouldn’t trust him.”

9. Roguish

To be roguish means to have a mischievous or playful nature, often characterized by a disregard for rules or conventions. It implies that the person is charming and cunning, but not necessarily infamous or malicious.

  • For instance, “He has a roguish smile that always gets him out of trouble.”
  • In a conversation about a charismatic person, someone might say, “He’s a bit roguish, but you can’t help but like him.”
  • A person might describe a playful prankster by saying, “He’s always up to some roguish antics.”

10. Noted

This term is used to indicate that something or someone has been recognized or acknowledged. It implies that the person or item has gained attention or recognition, but does not necessarily connote infamy.

  • For example, “The author’s latest book was well-received and noted for its unique perspective.”
  • In a discussion about achievements, someone might say, “She is a noted expert in her field.”
  • A person might describe a recognized accomplishment by saying, “His work was noted by the committee for its innovative approach.”

11. Blamed

When someone is blamed, they are held responsible for something negative or wrong that has happened. The term implies that the person is at fault or has caused harm.

  • For example, in a conversation about a failed project, someone might say, “He was blamed for the team’s lack of success.”
  • In a news article about a scandal, the headline might read, “Politician blamed for corruption charges.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “You will be blamed if you don’t finish your homework.”

12. Censured

To censure someone means to officially criticize or express strong disapproval of their actions or behavior. The term suggests that the person’s actions have violated accepted norms or standards.

  • For instance, in a government setting, a politician might be censured for misconduct or unethical behavior.
  • In a news report on a controversial figure, it might be mentioned that they have been censured by their peers.
  • A teacher might censure a student for cheating on a test.
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13. Tarnished

When something or someone is tarnished, their reputation or image has been damaged or compromised. The term implies that the person or thing was once considered valuable or respected, but is now seen in a negative light.

  • For example, a company’s reputation might be tarnished by a scandal or unethical business practices.
  • In a discussion about a celebrity’s downfall, someone might say, “Their once-shining reputation is now tarnished.”
  • A friend might warn another, “Be careful not to tarnish your reputation by associating with the wrong crowd.”

14. Sinister

Sinister refers to something or someone that is evil, threatening, or suggestive of harm. The term carries a sense of foreboding or danger.

  • For instance, in a horror movie, the villain might have a sinister smile or a sinister plot.
  • In a suspense novel, the detective might suspect a sinister motive behind a series of mysterious events.
  • A person might describe a dark and eerie forest as having a sinister atmosphere.

15. Devious

Devious describes someone or something that is sly, cunning, or deceitful. The term suggests a person or action that is not straightforward or honest.

  • For example, a con artist might use devious tactics to manipulate their victims.
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might accuse a politician of using devious means to gain power.
  • A friend might warn another, “Be careful of that person, they have a devious nature.”

16. Corrupt

This term refers to someone who is dishonest, especially in a position of power or authority. It suggests that the person is involved in illegal or unethical activities for personal gain.

  • For example, a news article might describe a politician as “corrupt” for accepting bribes.
  • In a discussion about corporate scandals, someone might say, “The corrupt executives were responsible for the company’s downfall.”
  • A person expressing frustration with a corrupt system might exclaim, “It’s time to clean up the corrupt politicians and bring about real change!”

17. Maligned

To malign someone is to speak ill of them or make false accusations against them. It implies that the person is unfairly criticized or attacked, often damaging their reputation.

  • For instance, a celebrity might feel maligned by tabloid rumors that portray them in a negative light.
  • In a heated online debate, one user might accuse another of maligning their character.
  • A person defending themselves against false accusations might say, “I won’t let myself be maligned by baseless claims.”

18. Outcast

An outcast is someone who is socially rejected or excluded from a group. It suggests that the person is seen as different or undesirable, often leading to isolation or loneliness.

  • For example, a teenager who doesn’t fit in with any social group might feel like an outcast.
  • In a discussion about workplace dynamics, someone might mention feeling like an outcast among their colleagues.
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “Being an outcast taught me to value true friendships.”

19. Opprobrious

Opprobrious is an adjective used to describe something that is highly offensive, shameful, or disgraceful. It suggests that the thing being described is deserving of strong criticism or condemnation.

  • For instance, a news article might describe the opprobrious behavior of a corrupt politician.
  • In a heated argument, one person might hurl opprobrious insults at another.
  • A person expressing their disapproval might say, “Such opprobrious behavior should not be tolerated.”

20. Reviled

To revile someone is to express intense dislike or hatred towards them. It implies that the person is despised or abhorred by others.

  • For example, a controversial public figure might be reviled by a large portion of the population.
  • In a discussion about historical figures, one might mention how certain leaders were reviled by their own people.
  • A person expressing their strong dislike might say, “I revile those who take advantage of others for personal gain.”

21. Blighted

This term refers to something or someone that is cursed or afflicted with a negative quality or condition. It can also be used to describe a place or area that is run-down or in a state of decay.

  • For example, “The blighted neighborhood was filled with abandoned buildings and overgrown lots.”
  • In a discussion about a person’s misfortune, one might say, “He seems to be blighted with bad luck.”
  • A writer might describe a character as, “A blighted soul haunted by their past.”

22. Stigmatized

This term is used to describe something or someone that is marked or labeled with a negative stigma or judgment. It often refers to individuals or groups who are marginalized or discriminated against.

  • For instance, “People with mental illnesses are often stigmatized by society.”
  • In a conversation about social issues, one might say, “We need to address the stigmatization of addiction.”
  • A person discussing a controversial topic might argue, “The stigmatized perspective is often based on ignorance and fear.”

23. Damned

This term is used to describe something or someone that is condemned or cursed. It can also be used to express frustration or anger.

  • For example, “The damned weather ruined our plans.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult situation, one might say, “We’re in a damned if we do, damned if we don’t scenario.”
  • A person expressing frustration might exclaim, “This damned computer keeps freezing!”

24. Reprehensible

This term is used to describe something or someone that is deserving of strong criticism or condemnation. It often implies that the action or behavior is morally wrong or offensive.

  • For instance, “His reprehensible actions towards others were widely condemned.”
  • In a conversation about ethics, one might say, “Lying is a reprehensible behavior.”
  • A person expressing disapproval might state, “I find his behavior absolutely reprehensible.”

25. Infamous

This term is used to describe something or someone who is well-known for being notorious or having a bad reputation. It often implies that the person or thing is widely known for negative reasons.

  • For example, “The infamous criminal was finally captured by the police.”
  • In a discussion about historical figures, one might say, “Al Capone is infamous for his involvement in organized crime.”
  • A person discussing a scandal might state, “The infamous scandal rocked the political world.”

26. Outlaw

An outlaw is someone who has broken the law and is considered a criminal. This term is often used to describe someone who operates outside of society’s norms and rules.

  • For example, “Billy the Kid was a notorious outlaw in the Old West.”
  • In a discussion about famous criminals, one might mention, “Jesse James was an infamous outlaw during the time of the Wild West.”
  • A person might use the term to describe themselves, saying, “I’m a bit of an outlaw when it comes to following rules.”

27. Infamoose

Infamoose is a playful slang term that combines “infamous” and “moose.” It is used to describe someone or something that is notorious or well-known for their negative actions or reputation.

  • For instance, “That politician is an infamoose for his corruption scandals.”
  • In a discussion about notorious criminals, one might say, “Al Capone was definitely an infamoose during the Prohibition era.”
  • A person might use the term humorously, saying, “I’m the infamoose of my friend group because I always cause trouble.”

28. Diabolical

Diabolical is an adjective used to describe something or someone that is evil, wicked, or malicious. It often implies a level of cunning or intelligence behind their actions.

  • For example, “The villain in the movie had a diabolical plan to take over the world.”
  • In a discussion about sinister characters, one might describe them as “diabolical masterminds.”
  • A person might use the term to describe a particularly difficult puzzle or problem, saying, “That math equation is diabolical!”

29. Malevolent

Malevolent is an adjective used to describe someone or something that is intentionally harmful, malicious, or evil. It suggests a deliberate intent to cause harm or suffering.

  • For instance, “The witch in the fairy tale was a malevolent character who wanted to harm others.”
  • In a discussion about dangerous animals, one might mention “malevolent snakes” or “malevolent spiders.”
  • A person might use the term to describe a disturbing or unsettling movie, saying, “That horror film had a malevolent atmosphere that gave me chills.”

30. Wicked

Wicked is an adjective used to describe something or someone that is evil, sinful, or morally wrong. It can also be used to describe something as cool, impressive, or excellent, depending on the context.

  • For example, “The wicked witch in the story was feared by all.”
  • In a discussion about supernatural entities, one might mention “wicked spirits” or “wicked demons.”
  • A person might use the term to describe a thrilling or intense experience, saying, “That roller coaster was wicked!”

31. Controversial

This term refers to something that is likely to cause disagreement or argument. It often describes topics, ideas, or actions that are highly debated or disputed.

  • For example, “The controversial decision sparked a heated debate among the panel.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “The candidate’s controversial statements have caused a lot of controversy.”
  • A news article might state, “The controversial new law has raised concerns among civil rights activists.”

32. Degenerate

This slang term is used to describe someone who is morally corrupt or engages in immoral or socially unacceptable behavior.

  • For instance, “He’s a degenerate gambler who has lost everything.”
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might say, “It was full of degenerate behavior.”
  • A person might describe a criminal as, “A degenerate who has no regard for the law.”

33. Censurable

This word is used to describe something that is deserving of strong criticism or blame. It often refers to actions or behavior that is considered morally wrong or unacceptable.

  • For example, “His censurable actions led to his downfall.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial decision, someone might say, “The board’s censurable behavior has caused outrage.”
  • A news article might state, “The company’s censurable practices have come under scrutiny.”

34. Blameworthy

This term is used to describe someone who is deserving of blame or responsibility for a particular action or outcome.

  • For instance, “The blameworthy party should be held accountable for their actions.”
  • In a conversation about a mistake, someone might say, “I take full responsibility, I am blameworthy.”
  • A person might describe a negligent driver as, “Blameworthy for causing the accident.”

35. Delinquent

This slang term is often used to describe someone, typically a young person, who regularly engages in illegal or antisocial behavior.

  • For example, “The delinquent teenager was caught stealing.”
  • In a discussion about troubled youth, someone might say, “We need to address the root causes of delinquent behavior.”
  • A news article might state, “The city has seen an increase in delinquent activity in recent months.”

36. Pariah

This term refers to someone who is rejected or shunned by society, often due to their actions or reputation. A pariah is seen as an outsider and is usually avoided or excluded.

  • For example, “After the scandal, he became a pariah in the industry.”
  • In a discussion about social dynamics, one might say, “Bullying can make someone feel like a pariah within their own school.”
  • Someone might use the term to describe a political figure who is widely disliked, saying, “The president has become a pariah among many citizens.”

37. Malefactor

A malefactor is a person who commits a crime or engages in wrongful actions. It is often used to describe someone who intentionally does something illegal or immoral.

  • For instance, “The police were searching for the malefactor who robbed the bank.”
  • In a courtroom drama, a lawyer might refer to the defendant as a malefactor, saying, “Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, my client is not a malefactor, but a victim.”
  • A news article might use the term to describe a notorious criminal, stating, “The malefactor has a long history of violent offenses.”

38. Infamouz

This term is a slang variation of “infamous” and is used to describe someone who is well-known for their bad reputation or notorious actions. It is often used in a more casual or street context.

  • For example, “He’s an infamouz rapper known for his controversial lyrics.”
  • In a conversation about local legends, someone might say, “There’s this infamouz haunted house in our town.”
  • A social media post might refer to a viral video, saying, “Check out this infamouz clip that everyone’s talking about.”

39. Depraved

This term describes someone who is morally corrupt or wicked. It is often used to describe individuals who engage in extreme or perverse behavior.

  • For instance, “The serial killer’s depraved actions shocked the nation.”
  • In a discussion about societal decay, someone might say, “The rise of depraved behavior is a symptom of a larger problem.”
  • A book review might describe a character as depraved, stating, “The protagonist’s descent into depravity is both disturbing and compelling.”