Top 61 Slang For Injustice – Meaning & Usage

In a world where fairness is often a luxury, it’s crucial to have the right words to express the feeling of injustice. Our team has curated a list of powerful slang terms that encapsulate the frustration and anger that comes with unfairness. From ‘screwjob’ to ‘shafted,’ we’ve got you covered with the most impactful phrases to help you navigate conversations about injustice. So, buckle up and get ready to empower your vocabulary with these impactful expressions!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Screwed over

This phrase is used to describe situations where someone has been taken advantage of or betrayed.

  • For example, “I can’t believe my boss screwed me over and gave the promotion to someone less qualified.”
  • A person might say, “I loaned my friend money and he never paid me back. I feel so screwed over.”
  • In a discussion about a bad business deal, someone might comment, “The company really screwed over their customers with their deceptive practices.”

2. Shafted

This slang term refers to being treated unfairly or receiving a raw deal.

  • For instance, “I got shafted by the insurance company when they denied my claim.”
  • A person might say, “I feel like I’m always getting shafted at work. I never get the recognition I deserve.”
  • In a conversation about a sports match, someone might comment, “The referee totally shafted our team with those bad calls.”

3. Ripped off

This phrase is used to describe situations where someone has been cheated or swindled out of their money or belongings.

  • For example, “I bought this designer purse online and it turned out to be a fake. I feel like I got ripped off.”
  • A person might say, “The mechanic charged me $500 for a simple repair. I definitely got ripped off.”
  • In a discussion about a scam, someone might comment, “Be careful when buying concert tickets online. There are a lot of scammers trying to rip people off.”

4. Done dirty

This slang term describes situations where someone has been treated poorly or betrayed by someone they trusted.

  • For instance, “My best friend started dating my ex-boyfriend. I feel so done dirty.”
  • A person might say, “I helped my coworker with a project, but she took all the credit. I was done dirty.”
  • In a conversation about a friendship gone sour, someone might comment, “She spread rumors about me behind my back. I can’t believe I was done dirty like that.”

5. Cheated

This term is used to describe situations where someone has been deceived or treated unjustly, especially in a romantic or competitive context.

  • For example, “I found out my partner was cheating on me. I feel so cheated.”
  • A person might say, “The other team cheated by using illegal tactics. It’s not fair.”
  • In a discussion about a rigged competition, someone might comment, “The judges were biased and the winner was clearly cheated.”

6. Swindled

To be deceived or tricked out of something valuable or to be taken advantage of. “Swindled” is a slang term used to describe the act of being cheated or conned.

  • For example, “I bought a counterfeit watch and realized I had been swindled.”
  • A person might say, “He promised to fix my car but just swindled me out of my money.”
  • Another might warn, “Be careful when buying online, you don’t want to get swindled by a scammer.”

7. Bamboozled

To be fooled or deceived in a clever or cunning way. “Bamboozled” is a slang term used to describe the act of being tricked or misled.

  • For instance, “I thought I was getting a great deal, but I was bamboozled by the salesperson.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t let yourself be bamboozled by false promises.”
  • Another might express frustration, “I can’t believe I fell for their lies, I feel completely bamboozled.”

8. Fleeced

To be taken advantage of or cheated out of money or possessions. “Fleeced” is a slang term used to describe the act of being swindled or robbed.

  • For example, “The mechanic charged me an exorbitant amount for a simple repair, I felt completely fleeced.”
  • A person might say, “Watch out for scams that aim to fleece unsuspecting individuals.”
  • Another might express anger, “I can’t believe they fleeced me out of my hard-earned savings.”

9. Hoodwinked

To be tricked or deceived in a clever or deceitful manner. “Hoodwinked” is a slang term used to describe the act of being deceived or misled.

  • For instance, “She pretended to be my friend but was actually trying to hoodwink me.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t let yourself be hoodwinked by false promises.”
  • Another might express disbelief, “I can’t believe I allowed myself to be hoodwinked by their lies.”

10. Conned

To be tricked or deceived, usually for personal gain or profit. “Conned” is a slang term used to describe the act of being scammed or deceived.

  • For example, “He conned me into investing in a fake business.”
  • A person might say, “Be cautious of individuals trying to con you out of your money.”
  • Another might express regret, “I can’t believe I fell for their scheme, I feel so conned.”

11. Double-crossed

To be deceived or betrayed by someone you trusted. “Double-crossed” suggests that the betrayal was intentional and done with malicious intent.

  • For example, “I thought he was my friend, but he double-crossed me and stole my idea.”
  • In a movie plot, a character might say, “I won’t let myself be double-crossed again. This time, I’ll be prepared.”
  • A person discussing a business deal gone wrong might say, “I got double-crossed by my business partner, and now I’m left with nothing.”

12. Jipped

To be unfairly treated or deceived, often in a financial transaction. “Jipped” is a derogatory term that implies being taken advantage of or swindled.

  • For instance, “I feel like I got jipped when I bought this product. It doesn’t work as advertised.”
  • A customer might complain, “I ordered a large pizza, but they gave me a small one. I got jipped!”
  • A person discussing a bad deal might say, “Don’t do business with that company. They’ll jip you every time.”

13. Gyped

To be deceived or cheated, often in a way that involves losing money or valuables. “Gyped” is a derogatory term that suggests being tricked or swindled.

  • For example, “I got gyped when I bought these concert tickets. They turned out to be fake.”
  • A person might say, “I feel like I got gyped by my landlord. They charged me for repairs that weren’t my responsibility.”
  • Someone discussing a fraudulent scheme might warn, “Be careful of online scams. You don’t want to get gyped out of your hard-earned money.”

14. Shortchanged

To be given less than what is deserved or expected, especially in terms of money or resources. “Shortchanged” implies being treated unfairly or not receiving one’s fair share.

  • For instance, “I feel like I got shortchanged on my paycheck. It’s lower than it should be.”
  • A customer might complain, “I ordered a large coffee, but they only gave me a small. I got shortchanged!”
  • A person discussing a disappointing experience might say, “I paid a lot for this concert, but the performance was shortchanged. I expected more.”

15. Robbed

To be unlawfully deprived of something valuable, often through force or threat. “Robbed” suggests a deliberate act of theft that results in a loss for the victim.

  • For example, “I got robbed when someone broke into my car and stole my laptop.”
  • A person might say, “I feel like I got robbed by the insurance company. They denied my claim for no valid reason.”
  • Someone discussing a high-priced purchase might say, “I paid so much for this item, but the quality is terrible. I got robbed!”

16. Grifted

To be “grifted” means to be deceived or swindled out of something, often money or possessions. It refers to being conned or tricked by someone in a dishonest manner.

  • For example, “I can’t believe I got grifted by that smooth-talking salesman.”
  • Someone might say, “He grifted me out of my life savings with a fake investment scheme.”
  • Another person might warn, “Be careful not to get grifted by online scams.”

17. Snookered

To be “snookered” means to be put in a difficult or impossible situation, often due to someone else’s actions or deception. It can also refer to being tricked or fooled by someone.

  • For instance, “I’m completely snookered by this impossible task.”
  • In a game of pool, a player might say, “I’ve been snookered by my opponent’s excellent shot.”
  • Someone might complain, “I feel snookered by the fine print in this contract.”

18. Jobbed

To be “jobbed” means to be treated unfairly, taken advantage of, or cheated in a specific situation. It implies being on the receiving end of unfair treatment or being dealt a bad hand.

  • For example, “I feel like I got jobbed by my boss when I didn’t get the promotion I deserved.”
  • In a sports context, a fan might say, “Our team got jobbed by a bad call from the referees.”
  • Another person might exclaim, “I got jobbed by the airline when my flight was canceled without compensation.”

19. Gypped

To be “gypped” means to be cheated, swindled, or deceived out of something, often money or possessions. The term is considered derogatory and originates from the offensive stereotype that Romani people are dishonest or untrustworthy.

  • For instance, “I feel like I got gypped by the car salesman who sold me a lemon.”
  • Someone might say, “Don’t get gypped by those street vendors selling counterfeit goods.”
  • Another person might warn, “Watch out for scams that can leave you feeling gypped.”

20. Finessed

To be “finessed” means to be skillfully manipulated or outsmarted by someone. It implies being deceived or tricked in a clever and subtle way.

  • For example, “He finessed his way into getting a discount on the expensive item.”
  • In a game of poker, a player might say, “I got finessed by my opponent’s bluff.”
  • Someone might caution, “Be careful not to get finessed by smooth-talking con artists.”

21. Raw deal

When someone experiences unfair or unfavorable treatment or receives an unfavorable outcome in a situation. The term “raw deal” implies that the person did not receive what they deserved or were promised.

  • For example, “I worked so hard on that project, but my boss gave me a raw deal and took credit for my work.”
  • In a discussion about a legal case, someone might say, “The defendant got a raw deal because the evidence was mishandled.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I got a raw deal at the car dealership. They sold me a faulty car and refused to refund my money.”

22. Jerked around

When someone is treated disrespectfully, manipulated, or deceived in a way that is unfair or unjust. The term “jerked around” suggests that the person is being toyed with or taken advantage of.

  • For instance, “I feel like my boss is constantly jerking me around, giving me conflicting instructions.”
  • In a conversation about a relationship, someone might say, “He jerked me around for months, leading me to believe we had a future together.”
  • A person discussing customer service might say, “I called the company multiple times, but they just jerked me around and never resolved my issue.”

23. Double-dealt

When someone is betrayed or deceived by someone they trusted or had a close relationship with. The term “double-dealt” implies that the person has been tricked or cheated on multiple levels.

  • For example, “I thought we were friends, but she double-dealt me by spreading rumors about me behind my back.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “The politician double-dealt the public by promising one thing during the campaign and doing the opposite in office.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I feel double-dealt by my business partner, who took all the profits for himself without informing me.”

24. Short-changed

When someone receives less than what they deserve or expect in a particular situation. The term “short-changed” suggests that the person did not receive the full or proper amount.

  • For instance, “I worked overtime, but my paycheck was short-changed by the company.”
  • In a conversation about customer service, someone might say, “I ordered a large pizza, but they short-changed me and delivered a small one.”
  • A person discussing a negotiation might say, “I feel like I got short-changed in the deal. The other party got all the advantages while I got very little.”

25. Slighted

When someone is treated with disrespect or disregard, often resulting in feelings of hurt or offense. The term “slighted” implies that the person has been overlooked or not given the attention or consideration they deserve.

  • For example, “I invited all my friends to my party, but I felt slighted when no one showed up.”
  • In a discussion about workplace dynamics, someone might say, “I constantly feel slighted by my colleagues, who never acknowledge my contributions.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I was slighted by the restaurant staff, who ignored me and served others who arrived after me.”

26. Misled

This term refers to being given false or inaccurate information that leads to a misunderstanding or mistaken belief.

  • For example, “The politician misled the public with his false promises.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might argue, “Don’t be misled by biased media sources.”
  • A person might say, “I feel misled by the company’s misleading advertising campaign.”

27. Victimized

To be victimized means to be subjected to unfair treatment or harm, often as a result of an unjust system or individual actions.

  • For instance, “She felt victimized by the oppressive policies of the company.”
  • In a conversation about social inequality, someone might say, “Minority communities are often victimized by systemic racism.”
  • A person might share their experience by saying, “I was victimized by a dishonest business owner who took advantage of me.”

28. Oppressed

Being oppressed means being treated unfairly and cruelly, often by those in positions of power or authority.

  • For example, “The government oppressed its citizens through strict censorship and surveillance.”
  • In a discussion about gender inequality, someone might argue, “Women have been historically oppressed by patriarchal societies.”
  • A person might share their experience by saying, “I grew up in an oppressed community where our rights were constantly violated.”

29. Discriminated against

To be discriminated against means to be treated unfairly or differently based on attributes such as race, gender, or religion.

  • For instance, “He was discriminated against because of his disability.”
  • In a conversation about equal rights, someone might say, “LGBTQ+ individuals still face discrimination in many parts of the world.”
  • A person might share their experience by saying, “I have been discriminated against because of my ethnic background.”

30. Marginalized

Being marginalized means being pushed to the fringes of society, often resulting in limited access to resources, opportunities, and power.

  • For example, “The homeless population is often marginalized and ignored by society.”
  • In a discussion about social class, someone might argue, “The working class is frequently marginalized and overlooked.”
  • A person might share their experience by saying, “As a person with a disability, I have felt marginalized and excluded from many aspects of life.”

31. Exploited

This term refers to being unfairly used or manipulated for someone else’s gain, often resulting in a loss or harm to the exploited individual.

  • For example, “Many workers in low-wage industries are exploited by their employers.”
  • In a discussion about unfair labor practices, someone might say, “Workers deserve fair wages and protection from being exploited.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was exploited by my former boss who made me work long hours without proper compensation.”

32. Abused

This word describes the act of subjecting someone to cruel or harmful treatment, often resulting in physical, emotional, or psychological harm.

  • For instance, “Children who are abused may suffer long-lasting trauma.”
  • In a conversation about domestic violence, someone might say, “No one should ever tolerate being abused by their partner.”
  • A survivor of abuse might share their story by saying, “I was abused by a family member for years before I found the courage to leave.”

33. Mistreated

This term refers to being treated in an unjust or unfair manner, often resulting in negative consequences or harm to the mistreated individual.

  • For example, “Many patients feel mistreated by the healthcare system, leading to a lack of trust.”
  • In a discussion about workplace discrimination, someone might say, “Employees should not be mistreated based on their gender, race, or sexual orientation.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was mistreated by a teacher who constantly belittled me in front of the class.”

34. Disadvantaged

This word describes individuals or groups who face unfavorable circumstances or lack access to resources and opportunities, often resulting in an unfair disadvantage or inequality.

  • For instance, “Children from disadvantaged backgrounds often struggle to succeed academically.”
  • In a conversation about social justice, someone might say, “We need to address the systemic barriers that keep disadvantaged communities from thriving.”
  • A person advocating for equal opportunities might say, “We must provide support and resources to help lift disadvantaged individuals out of poverty.”

35. Wronged

This term refers to being treated in a way that goes against what is fair or morally right, often resulting in a sense of injustice or harm to the wronged individual.

  • For example, “Victims of crime often feel wronged by the justice system if their perpetrators go unpunished.”
  • In a discussion about human rights, someone might say, “We must seek justice for those who have been wronged.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was wronged by a company that refused to honor their warranty.”

36. Unjustly treated

This phrase refers to being treated in a manner that is not just or fair. It implies that someone has been subjected to unfair actions or behavior.

  • For example, “She felt unjustly treated when she was passed over for a promotion.”
  • In a discussion about workplace discrimination, someone might say, “Employees should not have to endure being unjustly treated based on their race or gender.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was unjustly treated by the police during a routine traffic stop.”

37. Ill-treated

To be ill-treated means to be treated in a harsh or cruel manner. It implies that someone has been subjected to unfair or abusive actions.

  • For instance, “The prisoner claimed he was ill-treated while in custody.”
  • In a conversation about animal rights, someone might say, “We need to address the issue of animals being ill-treated in factory farms.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was ill-treated by my former boss, who constantly belittled and demeaned me.”

38. Unfairly disadvantaged

This phrase describes a situation where someone is placed at a disadvantage in a way that is not fair or just. It suggests that someone has been unfairly treated or put in a position of disadvantage.

  • For example, “Children from low-income families are often unfairly disadvantaged in terms of educational opportunities.”
  • In a discussion about social inequality, someone might say, “Certain communities are systematically and unfairly disadvantaged in access to healthcare.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I grew up in a neighborhood that was unfairly disadvantaged in terms of resources and support.”

39. Unjustly wronged

To be unjustly wronged means to be treated in a way that is not fair or just, resulting in harm or injury. It implies that someone has been subjected to unfair actions or treatment.

  • For instance, “He felt he had been unjustly wronged when his ideas were stolen and credited to someone else.”
  • In a conversation about legal justice, someone might say, “The justice system failed the victim, who was unjustly wronged.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was unjustly wronged by a business that took advantage of my trust and cheated me.”

40. Inequitably treated

This phrase describes being treated in a way that is not fair or just. It suggests that someone has been subjected to unfair actions or treatment.

  • For example, “Employees accused the company of inequitably treating workers based on their gender.”
  • In a discussion about racial discrimination, someone might say, “Minorities are often inequitably treated in the criminal justice system.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I felt inequitably treated when I was denied a promotion despite meeting all the qualifications.”

41. Unjustly maligned

This term refers to someone who is unfairly and falsely accused or blamed for something.

  • For example, “She was unjustly maligned by the media for a crime she didn’t commit.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial figure, someone might argue, “He has been unjustly maligned by his political opponents.”
  • A person defending a friend might say, “She’s been unjustly maligned by rumors and gossip.”

42. Unjustifiably persecuted

This phrase describes someone who is subjected to unfair treatment or harassment without any valid reason.

  • For instance, “He was unjustifiably persecuted by the authorities for his political beliefs.”
  • In a conversation about discrimination, someone might say, “Minority groups are often unjustifiably persecuted.”
  • A person discussing historical events might mention, “Many innocent individuals were unjustifiably persecuted during the witch trials.”

43. Unfairly targeted

This term refers to someone who is unfairly singled out or selected for negative treatment or discrimination.

  • For example, “He feels he is unfairly targeted by the police because of his race.”
  • In a discussion about workplace discrimination, someone might say, “Women are often unfairly targeted for harassment.”
  • A person expressing frustration might exclaim, “I’m tired of being unfairly targeted for my beliefs!”

44. Unjustly oppressed

This phrase describes someone who is unfairly and harshly treated or controlled by others.

  • For instance, “The minority group has been unjustly oppressed for generations.”
  • In a conversation about human rights, someone might say, “No one should be unjustly oppressed based on their gender.”
  • A person discussing historical events might mention, “The people rose up against their unjustly oppressive rulers.”

45. Unjustly penalized

This term refers to someone who is subjected to unfair punishment or penalty without any valid reason.

  • For example, “He was unjustly penalized for a mistake that wasn’t his fault.”
  • In a discussion about school discipline, someone might say, “Students of color are often unjustly penalized at higher rates.”
  • A person expressing frustration might exclaim, “I don’t deserve to be unjustly penalized for a minor infraction!”

46. Unjustly condemned

This phrase refers to a situation where someone is unfairly found guilty and punished for a crime they did not commit. It implies that the person has been wrongly condemned without proper evidence or a fair trial.

  • For example, “He was unjustly condemned for a crime he didn’t commit and spent years in prison.”
  • In a discussion about wrongful convictions, someone might say, “Many innocent people have been unjustly condemned due to flawed forensic evidence.”
  • A news article might highlight a case of unjust condemnation, stating, “New evidence suggests that the man was unjustly condemned based on unreliable witness testimony.”

47. Unjustly vilified

This term refers to the act of being unfairly and harshly criticized, often with the intention to damage one’s reputation. It implies that someone is being unjustly vilified without valid reasons or evidence.

  • For instance, “She was unjustly vilified in the media for her personal choices.”
  • In a discussion about online harassment, someone might say, “Many people are unjustly vilified on social media for expressing their opinions.”
  • An article might discuss the consequences of unjust vilification, stating, “The individual faced severe mental health issues due to being unjustly vilified by online trolls.”

48. Unjustly ostracized

This phrase refers to the act of being unfairly excluded or ignored by a group or community. It implies that someone is being unjustly ostracized without valid reasons or justification.

  • For example, “He was unjustly ostracized by his colleagues after speaking up against workplace discrimination.”
  • In a discussion about bullying, someone might say, “Many children experience unjust ostracization in school due to their differences.”
  • An opinion piece might argue against unjust ostracization, stating, “No one should be unjustly ostracized based on their race, religion, or sexual orientation.”

49. Unjustly stigmatized

This term refers to the act of being unfairly labeled or judged based on certain characteristics or actions. It implies that someone is being unjustly stigmatized without considering their individual circumstances or experiences.

  • For instance, “She was unjustly stigmatized as a troublemaker because of a single mistake.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might say, “Many individuals with mental illnesses are unjustly stigmatized and face discrimination.”
  • An awareness campaign might aim to challenge unjust stigmatization, stating, “Let’s break the cycle of unjustly stigmatizing those who seek help for addiction.”

50. Unjustly discriminated against

This phrase refers to the act of being unfairly treated or disadvantaged due to prejudice or bias. It implies that someone is being unjustly discriminated against without considering their individual rights or abilities.

  • For example, “He was unjustly discriminated against in the hiring process because of his ethnicity.”
  • In a discussion about systemic racism, someone might say, “Many marginalized communities continue to be unjustly discriminated against in various aspects of life.”
  • A news article might highlight a case of unjust discrimination, stating, “The company is facing a lawsuit for unjustly discriminating against employees based on their gender.”

51. Unjustly marginalized

This phrase refers to individuals or groups who are treated unfairly and are denied equal opportunities or rights. It highlights the unjust treatment and discrimination they face.

  • For example, “People of color are often unjustly marginalized in our society.”
  • A discussion about workplace diversity might mention, “Women are still unjustly marginalized in leadership positions.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “I’ve been unjustly marginalized because of my disability.”

52. Unjust treatment

This phrase describes actions or behaviors that are unfair, biased, or discriminatory towards an individual or group. It emphasizes the lack of justice in how someone is treated.

  • For instance, “Employees should not tolerate unjust treatment in the workplace.”
  • A person discussing social issues might state, “Many minorities face unjust treatment by law enforcement.”
  • A news article might report, “The court ruled that the defendant received unjust treatment during the trial.”

53. Short end of the stick

This phrase is used to describe a situation where someone is on the losing end, receiving unfair or unfavorable treatment. It suggests being at a disadvantage or not getting what one deserves.

  • For example, “The workers always get the short end of the stick while the company profits.”
  • A person expressing frustration might say, “I always seem to get the short end of the stick in relationships.”
  • A discussion about unequal distribution of resources might mention, “Low-income communities often get the short end of the stick when it comes to government funding.”

54. Flimflammed

This term refers to being tricked, deceived, or cheated in a dishonest way. It implies being taken advantage of or swindled.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe I got flimflammed by that car salesman.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I was flimflammed into buying a counterfeit product.”
  • A discussion about scams might mention, “Many people fall victim to online schemes and get flimflammed out of their money.”

55. Gipped

This word is used to describe being cheated or ripped off, often in a financial transaction. It implies being deceived or swindled out of something.

  • For example, “I feel like I got gipped by that repairman. He charged me double for a simple fix.”
  • A person sharing their frustration might say, “I got gipped by the hotel. They promised a luxury experience but delivered subpar service.”
  • A discussion about unfair pricing might mention, “Customers often feel gipped when they discover price discrepancies in the market.”

56. Hornswoggled

To be tricked or misled, often in a cunning or dishonest way. “Hornswoggled” is a slang term that denotes a sense of being cheated or swindled.

  • For example, “I thought I was getting a great deal, but I was hornswoggled into buying a counterfeit product.”
  • In a discussion about scams, someone might say, “Don’t fall for those online schemes, you’ll just end up hornswoggled.”
  • A person recounting a story of being deceived might say, “I can’t believe I let myself get hornswoggled like that.”

57. Gulled

Similar to “hornswoggled,” “gulled” refers to being deceived or tricked in a cunning or deceitful manner. It carries the connotation of being taken advantage of or made a fool of.

  • For instance, “He was gulled into investing in a fraudulent company.”
  • In a conversation about manipulation, someone might say, “Don’t let yourself be gulled by their smooth talk.”
  • A person reflecting on a past experience might say, “I was completely gulled by their promises, and it cost me dearly.”

58. Chiseled

To be chiseled means to be cheated or swindled out of something, often through dishonest or fraudulent means. This slang term implies a sense of unfairness or injustice in the act of being cheated.

  • For example, “He chiseled me out of my rightful inheritance.”
  • In a discussion about scams, someone might warn, “Watch out for those con artists who try to chisel you out of your money.”
  • A person recounting a story of being cheated might say, “I can’t believe I let myself get chiseled like that.”

59. Cozened

To be cozened means to be deceived or tricked, often through deceitful or manipulative tactics. This slang term implies a sense of being taken advantage of or manipulated for someone else’s gain.

  • For instance, “She cozened me into giving her my password.”
  • In a conversation about trust, someone might say, “Don’t let yourself be cozened by their false promises.”
  • A person reflecting on a past experience might say, “I was completely cozened by their charm, and it took me a while to realize the truth.”

60. Beguiled

To be beguiled means to be deceived or misled, often through charm or trickery. This slang term conveys a sense of being enchanted or captivated by someone’s deceitful actions.

  • For example, “He beguiled me into believing he was someone he wasn’t.”
  • In a discussion about manipulation, someone might say, “Don’t let yourself be beguiled by their smooth words.”
  • A person recounting a story of being deceived might say, “I can’t believe I let myself be beguiled like that.”

61. Defrauded

To be defrauded means to be deceived or cheated out of something, usually money or property. It refers to an act of fraud or dishonesty where someone intentionally misrepresents information or deceives another person for personal gain.

  • For example, “I invested in a company that turned out to be a scam and I was defrauded out of thousands of dollars.”
  • In a discussion about online scams, someone might say, “Be careful of phishing emails that can defraud you of your personal information.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I was defrauded by a contractor who took my money and never completed the work.”
See also  Top 37 Slang For Looking – Meaning & Usage