Top 48 Slang For Instruction – Meaning & Usage

Are you ready to level up your slang game when it comes to instructions? Whether you’re a seasoned pro or just dipping your toes into the world of trendy language, we’ve got you covered. Our team has scoured the depths of the internet to bring you a curated list of the hottest slang for instruction that will have you navigating like a pro in no time. Stay ahead of the curve and get ready to upgrade your vocab with our must-read listicle!

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1. Break it down

This phrase is used to ask someone to explain or demonstrate something in a simplified, step-by-step manner.

  • For example, a dance instructor might say, “Let me break down the choreography for you.”
  • In a cooking class, the instructor might say, “I’ll break it down for you: first, you chop the vegetables.”
  • A teacher might say to a student, “If you’re having trouble with this math problem, let’s break it down into smaller parts.”

2. Walkthrough

A walkthrough is a detailed explanation or demonstration of how to complete a task or solve a problem, usually provided in a sequential manner.

  • For instance, in a video game, a player might search for a walkthrough to help them progress through a challenging level.
  • A software developer might create a walkthrough to guide users through the setup process of a new application.
  • In a DIY project, a homeowner might follow a walkthrough to install a new light fixture.

3. How-to

A how-to is a set of step-by-step instructions or guidance on how to perform a specific task or achieve a particular outcome.

  • For example, a website might feature a how-to guide on building a bookshelf from scratch.
  • A YouTube video might provide a how-to on creating a smoky eye makeup look.
  • A cooking blog might share a how-to recipe for making homemade pasta.

4. Guide

A guide is a document or resource that provides instructions, advice, or information on how to do something or navigate a particular process or system.

  • For instance, a travel guide might provide information on popular attractions and tips for navigating a new city.
  • A fitness guide might outline a workout plan and provide tips for achieving specific fitness goals.
  • A user manual for a new gadget might serve as a guide for setting up and using the device.

5. Tutorial

A tutorial is a lesson or educational resource that provides step-by-step guidance on how to perform a specific task or learn a particular skill.

  • For example, a photography website might offer a tutorial on how to edit photos in Photoshop.
  • A knitting blog might provide a tutorial on how to knit a basic scarf.
  • A coding platform might offer a tutorial on how to build a simple website using HTML and CSS.

6. DIY

This term refers to the practice of completing a task or project on your own, without the help of professionals. It often involves learning new skills and using available resources to accomplish a goal.

  • For example, “I’m going to DIY my own bookshelf using reclaimed wood.”
  • A person might say, “I love DIY projects because they allow me to be creative and save money.”
  • Another might ask, “Does anyone have any DIY tips for repainting furniture?”

7. Step-by-step

This term describes a method or approach that involves following a series of ordered steps or instructions to complete a task or achieve a goal. It emphasizes the importance of taking one step at a time and not skipping any crucial stages.

  • For instance, “I followed a step-by-step guide to bake a cake, and it turned out perfectly.”
  • A person might say, “When learning a new skill, it’s important to break it down into step-by-step processes.”
  • Another might ask, “Can someone provide a step-by-step tutorial on how to knit a scarf?”

8. Show me the ropes

This phrase is used when someone wants to learn how to do something or become familiar with a new task or environment. It implies that the person is seeking guidance or instruction from someone with more experience or knowledge.

  • For example, “I’m new to this job. Can you show me the ropes?”
  • A person might say, “I’m interested in learning how to play guitar. Can someone show me the ropes?”
  • Another might ask, “Can you show me the ropes of using this software?”

9. Teach me

This phrase is a straightforward request for someone to share their knowledge or skills with another person. It implies a desire to learn and an openness to receiving instruction.

  • For instance, “I want to learn how to cook. Can you teach me?”
  • A person might say, “I’m struggling with this math problem. Can you teach me how to solve it?”
  • Another might ask, “Can you teach me how to change a flat tire?”

10. Run me through

This phrase is used when someone wants to be guided through a process or task, usually step-by-step. It implies a need for someone to explain and demonstrate how to do something.

  • For example, “I’m not familiar with this software. Can you run me through how to use it?”
  • A person might say, “I’ve never cooked this recipe before. Can you run me through the steps?”
  • Another might ask, “Can you run me through the process of setting up a new email account?”

11. Clue me in

This phrase is used when someone wants to be informed or updated about a situation or topic. It implies that the person is seeking clarification or understanding.

  • For example, if someone is discussing a complex issue, they might say, “Clue me in on what’s going on here.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might ask, “Can you clue me in on the new project?”
  • If someone is confused about a joke, they might say, “I don’t get it, clue me in.”

12. Fill me in

This phrase is used when someone wants to be updated or informed about something they missed or don’t know about. It implies that the person is seeking to be brought up to speed or to have gaps in their knowledge filled.

  • For instance, if someone missed a meeting, they might ask a colleague, “Can you fill me in on what I missed?”
  • In a conversation about recent news, someone might say, “I haven’t been following the story, can you fill me in?”
  • If someone is unaware of a recent development, they might ask, “Can you fill me in on the details?”

13. Lay it out

This phrase is used when someone wants a straightforward and easily understandable explanation or set of instructions. It implies that the person is seeking a clear and organized presentation of information.

  • For example, if someone is struggling to understand a concept, they might say, “Can you lay it out for me?”
  • In a classroom setting, a teacher might say, “Let me lay out the steps for solving this math problem.”
  • If someone is unsure of how to complete a task, they might ask, “Can you lay it out step by step?”

14. Spell it out

This phrase is used when someone wants a thorough and explicit explanation or clarification. It implies that the person is seeking a detailed breakdown or description of something.

  • For instance, if someone is confused about a complex process, they might say, “Can you spell it out for me?”
  • In a discussion about a complicated topic, someone might ask, “Can you spell out the specifics of your argument?”
  • If someone is having trouble understanding instructions, they might request, “Can you spell it out so I know exactly what to do?”

15. Give me the lowdown

This phrase is used when someone wants a comprehensive and concise summary or explanation. It implies that the person is seeking a complete and thorough understanding of a situation or topic.

  • For example, if someone is curious about an event, they might say, “Give me the lowdown on what happened.”
  • In a conversation about a new product, someone might ask, “Can you give me the lowdown on its features?”
  • If someone is unfamiliar with a situation, they might request, “Give me the lowdown so I know what to expect.”

16. Show me how it’s done

This phrase is used when you want someone to physically show you how to complete a task or perform an action. It implies that you want to observe the process in order to learn and replicate it.

  • For example, if you’re learning to play a new song on the guitar, you might ask a more experienced musician, “Can you show me how it’s done?”
  • In a cooking class, a student might ask the instructor, “Could you show me how to properly dice an onion?”
  • If you’re struggling to solve a math problem, you might ask a classmate, “Can you show me how it’s done step by step?”

17. Break it to me gently

This phrase is used when you want someone to deliver bad or difficult news to you in a way that softens the blow or minimizes the emotional impact.

  • For instance, if you’re about to be laid off from your job, you might say to your boss, “Can you break it to me gently?”
  • If a friend needs to tell you something that might upset you, they might say, “I have something to tell you, but I’ll break it to you gently.”
  • In a relationship, if you need to discuss a sensitive topic with your partner, you might ask, “Can we sit down and talk? I need you to break it to me gently.”

18. Talk me through it

This phrase is used when you want someone to verbally guide you through a process or task, providing detailed explanations and instructions along the way.

  • For example, if you’re learning how to assemble a piece of furniture, you might ask a friend, “Can you talk me through it?”
  • In a computer troubleshooting scenario, you might say to a tech support representative, “I’m not very familiar with computers. Could you talk me through the process of troubleshooting?”
  • If you’re struggling to understand a complex concept, you might ask a teacher, “Can you talk me through it again?”

19. Point me in the right direction

This phrase is used when you want someone to give you guidance or advice on where to find the information or resources you need to accomplish a task or solve a problem.

  • For instance, if you’re new to a city and looking for a good restaurant, you might ask a local, “Can you point me in the right direction?”
  • If you’re researching a specific topic and need help finding reliable sources, you might ask a librarian, “Could you point me in the right direction for scholarly articles on this subject?”
  • In a job search, if you’re unsure of where to start, you might ask a career counselor, “Can you point me in the right direction for job listings in my field?”

20. Enlighten me

This phrase is used when you want someone to share their knowledge or insight on a particular topic, with the intention of expanding your understanding or awareness.

  • For example, if you’re discussing a complex political issue with a friend, you might say, “Enlighten me. What are your thoughts on this?”
  • In a classroom setting, a student might ask a teacher, “Could you enlighten me on the historical context of this novel?”
  • If you’re attending a lecture and want to learn more about a specific concept, you might approach the speaker afterward and say, “I found your talk fascinating. Could you enlighten me further on the research behind it?”

21. Run it by me

This phrase is used to ask someone to explain or clarify something. It implies that the person wants the information to be shared in a concise and easily understandable manner.

  • For example, if someone is explaining a complex concept, you might say, “Can you run it by me one more time?”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “Before you make any decisions, run it by me first.”
  • If someone is giving you directions, you might ask, “Can you run it by me step by step?”

22. Walk me through the steps

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide a detailed explanation or demonstration of the steps involved in a particular process or task.

  • For instance, if someone is showing you how to use a new software, you might say, “Can you walk me through the steps?”
  • In a cooking class, a chef might say, “Let me walk you through the steps of making a perfect omelette.”
  • If someone is explaining how to assemble a piece of furniture, you might ask, “Can you walk me through each step?”

23. Brief me on it

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide a brief or concise overview of a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, if someone is about to present a project, you might say, “Can you brief me on it before the meeting?”
  • In a military context, a commander might say, “I need you to brief me on the current situation.”
  • If someone is explaining a new policy, you might ask, “Can you brief me on the key points?”

24. Give me the rundown

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide a comprehensive or detailed explanation of a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, if someone is explaining a new project, you might say, “Can you give me the rundown?”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “Give me the rundown on our opponents’ strengths and weaknesses.”
  • If someone is describing a movie plot, you might ask, “Can you give me the rundown without any spoilers?”

25. Teach me the ropes

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide instruction or guidance on how to do a particular task or navigate a specific environment.

  • For example, if someone is starting a new job, they might say, “Can you teach me the ropes?”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “I’ll teach you the ropes of the game.”
  • If someone is new to a hobby, they might ask, “Can you teach me the ropes of photography?”

26. Break it down step by step

This phrase is often used when someone wants instructions or information broken down into individual steps, making it easier to understand and follow.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let me break down the process of solving this math problem step by step.”
  • In a cooking tutorial, the instructor might explain, “Now, let’s break down the recipe into simple steps.”
  • A coach might say to their team, “We need to break down the play step by step to ensure everyone understands their role.”

27. Show me the way

This phrase is used when someone wants to see a demonstration or example of how to do something.

  • For instance, if someone is learning a new dance move, they might ask, “Can you show me the way?”
  • In a workshop, an instructor might say, “Let me show you the way to properly use this tool.”
  • A person might ask their friend, “Can you show me the way to tie a tie?”

28. Talk me through the process

This phrase is used when someone wants instructions or guidance explained to them verbally.

  • For example, if someone is trying to assemble a piece of furniture, they might ask, “Can you talk me through the process?”
  • In a software tutorial, the instructor might say, “Let me talk you through the steps of installing this program.”
  • A person might ask their colleague, “Can you talk me through the process of submitting an expense report?”

29. Give me the scoop

This phrase is used when someone wants to be informed or updated on a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, if someone is curious about the latest gossip, they might say, “Give me the scoop!”
  • In a news interview, a reporter might ask, “Can you give me the scoop on the upcoming event?”
  • A friend might ask, “Hey, what’s the scoop on the party tonight?”

30. Break it down into simple terms

This phrase is used when someone wants instructions or information to be presented in a way that is easy to understand, using simple language and concepts.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let’s break down this complex concept into simple terms.”
  • In a technical manual, the author might explain, “We have broken down the instructions into simple terms for easier comprehension.”
  • A presenter might say, “I’ll break down the topic into simple terms so everyone can follow along.”

31. Show me how to do it

This phrase is used to ask someone to physically show or explain how to do something. It implies a desire for a step-by-step demonstration or explanation.

  • For example, if you’re trying to learn how to tie a tie, you might ask, “Can you show me how to do it?”
  • In a cooking class, a student might request, “Could you show me how to chop an onion?”
  • A person struggling with a computer program might say, “I can’t figure it out, can you show me how to do it?”

32. Deets

Short for “details,” this slang term refers to specific information or facts about something. It is often used when discussing plans, events, or gossip.

  • For instance, if someone asks about a party, you might respond, “I’ll give you the deets later.”
  • In a conversation about a new movie, a friend might say, “Tell me the deets – is it worth watching?”
  • When discussing a celebrity scandal, someone might ask, “What are the deets on that situation?”

33. Lowdown

The “lowdown” is the essential or most important information about a particular subject. It can also refer to the inside scoop or confidential details that are not widely known.

  • For example, if you’re planning a trip, you might ask a friend who has been there for the lowdown on the best places to visit.
  • In a business meeting, a colleague might say, “Give us the lowdown on the new project.”
  • When discussing a news story, someone might ask, “What’s the lowdown on that situation?”

34. 411

Derived from the telephone number for directory assistance in the United States, “411” has become slang for general information or knowledge about a particular topic.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “What’s the 411 on that new restaurant?” they are seeking information or details about it.
  • In a conversation about a popular TV show, someone might say, “I need the 411 on the latest episode.”
  • When discussing a current event, a person might ask, “Do you have the 411 on what happened?”

35. Rundown

A “rundown” is a concise summary or overview of a situation, event, or set of instructions. It provides a quick and condensed version of the important points.

  • For example, if someone asks about a meeting they missed, you might give them a rundown of what was discussed.
  • In a sports game, a commentator might provide a rundown of the key plays and scores.
  • When explaining a complex process, a teacher might give their students a rundown of the steps involved.
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36. Intel

Short for “intelligence,” this term refers to valuable or useful information that can be used to gain an advantage or make informed decisions.

  • For example, a spy might say, “I have some intel on the enemy’s plans.”
  • In a business context, someone might ask, “Do you have any intel on our competitors?”
  • A gamer might share, “Here’s some intel on how to defeat the final boss in this level.”

37. Scoop

This term is often used to describe exclusive or breaking news that is obtained before anyone else. It can also refer to secret or confidential information.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “I got the scoop on the mayor’s scandal.”
  • A friend might tell you, “I have the inside scoop on the new restaurant opening.”
  • A blogger might write, “Here’s the scoop on the latest fashion trends.”

38. Guidance

This term refers to advice, recommendations, or instructions given to someone to help them make decisions or navigate a situation.

  • For example, a teacher might provide guidance to a student on how to improve their writing.
  • A mentor might offer guidance to a mentee on career choices.
  • A parent might give guidance to their child on how to handle a difficult situation.

39. 101

Derived from the numbering system used by universities to denote introductory courses, “101” is used to indicate basic or fundamental information about a subject.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Let me give you a 101 on how to use this software.”
  • In a cooking class, the instructor might start with a “Cooking 101” lesson.
  • A book might have a chapter titled “Investing 101” to provide beginners with essential information.
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40. Tips and tricks

This phrase refers to helpful hints, techniques, or shortcuts that can make a task or activity easier or more efficient.

  • For example, a blogger might share “10 tips and tricks for organizing your closet.”
  • A gamer might create a video tutorial on “tips and tricks for winning in this game.”
  • A chef might write a cookbook with “tips and tricks for perfecting your baking skills.”

41. Pointers

“Pointers” refers to helpful tips or advice given to someone in order to guide them or improve their understanding or skills in a particular area.

  • For example, a coach might give their team some pointers on how to improve their performance.
  • A teacher might give their students pointers on how to study effectively for an exam.
  • In a conversation about cooking, someone might ask for pointers on how to make the perfect omelette.

42. Let me in on it

This phrase is used to request that someone share information or include you in something that is currently unknown or not understood by you.

  • For instance, if a group of friends is planning a surprise party, you might say, “Let me in on it, I want to help.”
  • In a discussion about a secret project at work, someone might ask, “Can you let me in on it? I want to be involved.”
  • If someone is talking about an inside joke that you don’t understand, you could say, “Let me in on it, what’s so funny?”

43. Brief me on the situation

This phrase is used to request a summary or update on a particular situation or topic.

  • For example, if someone is late to a meeting, they might ask their colleague to brief them on what they missed.
  • In a military context, a commander might ask their subordinate to brief them on the current status of a mission.
  • If someone is discussing a complex issue, you might ask them to briefly explain it to you by saying, “Can you brief me on the situation?”

44. Hip me to the game

This phrase is used to request that someone inform or educate you about something, particularly if it is new or unfamiliar to you.

  • For instance, if someone is talking about a new trend or slang, you might say, “Hip me to the game, what does that mean?”
  • In a conversation about a popular TV show, someone might ask, “Can you hip me to the game? I haven’t seen it yet.”
  • If someone is discussing a new technology, you could say, “I’m not familiar with that, can you hip me to the game?”

45. School me on it

This phrase is used to request that someone teach or educate you about a particular topic or subject.

  • For example, if someone is talking about a new dance move, you might say, “School me on it, I want to learn.”
  • In a conversation about a historical event, someone might ask, “Can you school me on it? I’m not familiar with that part of history.”
  • If someone is discussing a complex scientific concept, you could say, “I don’t understand, can you school me on it?”

46. Bring me up to speed

This phrase is used to ask someone to give you all the necessary information or updates on a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, if you’ve been away on vacation and want to know what you missed at work, you might say, “Can you bring me up to speed on what’s been happening?”
  • In a group project, if you’ve been absent from a meeting, you might ask your team members, “Can you bring me up to speed on what was discussed?”
  • If someone is explaining a complex concept, you might say, “I’m not familiar with this topic, can you bring me up to speed?”

47. Put me wise

This phrase is used to ask someone to share important or secret information with you.

  • For instance, if you suspect that your friend knows something that they haven’t told you, you might say, “Come on, put me wise. What’s going on?”
  • In a spy movie, a character might say, “Put me wise on the mission details. I need to know everything.”
  • If someone is discussing a complicated situation, you might ask, “Can you put me wise on the background of this issue? I want to understand it fully.”

48. Let me know the deal

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide you with information or an explanation of a particular situation or event.

  • For example, if you’re meeting a friend who has inside information on a new restaurant, you might say, “Hey, let me know the deal. Is it worth trying?”
  • In a business meeting, if someone is presenting a proposal, you might ask, “Can you let me know the deal? What are the potential risks and benefits?”
  • If someone is discussing a conflict, you might say, “I’m not sure what’s going on. Can you let me know the deal?”