Top 48 Slang For Integrate – Meaning & Usage

Integrating new slang into your vocabulary can be a fun and exciting way to stay current with the ever-evolving language trends. Whether you’re a language enthusiast or just looking to spice up your conversations, we’ve got you covered with a curated list of the latest and coolest slang for integrate. Stay ahead of the curve and impress your friends with these trendy expressions!

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1. Blend

To blend means to mix or combine different elements or components to create a unified whole. It can be used in various contexts, such as blending different flavors in cooking or blending different genres in music.

  • For example, a chef might say, “I like to blend different spices to create unique flavors.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might mention, “I love how she blends vintage and modern styles.”
  • A DJ might describe their music style as, “I blend hip-hop and electronic beats to create a unique sound.”

2. Merge

To merge means to combine or join together to form a single entity. It is often used in the context of businesses or organizations coming together, but can also be used to describe the combination of ideas or concepts.

  • For instance, a company might announce, “We are planning to merge with another company to expand our market presence.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “The smartphone has merged various devices into one.”
  • A writer might describe a book as, “A merging of fantasy and reality.”

3. Fuse

To fuse means to join or unite together to form a cohesive whole. It often implies a strong bond or connection between the elements being fused.

  • For example, in a discussion about music, someone might say, “Their music fuses elements of jazz and rock.”
  • In a conversation about culture, someone might mention, “The festival is a fusion of different traditions and art forms.”
  • A scientist might explain, “When two atoms fuse together, a tremendous amount of energy is released.”

4. Unify

To unify means to bring together or make into a single unit. It is often used to describe the process of creating harmony or agreement among different individuals or groups.

  • For instance, a political leader might strive to unify the nation by promoting inclusivity and understanding.
  • In a discussion about sports, someone might say, “The coach’s goal is to unify the team and create a strong bond.”
  • A teacher might aim to unify different perspectives in a classroom discussion by encouraging respectful dialogue.

5. Incorporate

To incorporate means to include or integrate something into a larger whole. It implies the act of bringing together different elements to form a complete entity.

  • For example, a designer might say, “I want to incorporate elements of nature into my artwork.”
  • In a conversation about business strategies, someone might mention, “We need to incorporate customer feedback into our decision-making process.”
  • A chef might describe a dish as, “Incorporating flavors from different cuisines.”

6. Assimilate

This term refers to the process of fully integrating into a new culture or group. It means to adopt the customs, language, and behaviors of the dominant group.

  • For example, when discussing immigration, someone might say, “Newcomers should be encouraged to assimilate into the local community.”
  • In a workplace diversity training, a facilitator might emphasize the importance of creating an inclusive environment where everyone feels comfortable assimilating.
  • A person might describe their experience moving to a new country by saying, “It took some time, but eventually I was able to assimilate into the local culture.”

7. Amalgamate

This term means to combine or unite different elements or groups into one cohesive entity. It often refers to the integration of organizations or the blending of different cultures.

  • For instance, when two companies merge, it can be said that they amalgamate their resources and expertise.
  • In a discussion about cultural diversity, someone might argue that societies should embrace and amalgamate different traditions and customs.
  • A person describing a successful collaboration might say, “We were able to amalgamate our ideas and create something truly unique.”

8. Join forces

This phrase means to come together and work as a team or group. It implies combining efforts, resources, or skills to achieve a common goal.

  • For example, during a crisis, different organizations might join forces to provide relief and support.
  • In a business context, two companies might join forces to launch a new product or enter a new market.
  • A person discussing the power of teamwork might say, “When we join forces, we can accomplish much more than when we work alone.”

9. Coalesce

This word means to come together and form a single whole. It implies the merging or blending of different elements or entities.

  • For instance, in a political context, different parties might coalesce to form a coalition government.
  • When discussing social movements, someone might say, “People from all walks of life coalesced to fight for equality.”
  • A person describing the formation of a close-knit community might say, “Over time, the residents coalesced into a supportive and tight-knit group.”

10. Intermingle

This term refers to the act of blending or mixing different elements together. It implies the combination or integration of diverse components.

  • For example, in a multicultural society, people from different backgrounds intermingle and share their traditions.
  • In a discussion about art, someone might describe a painting where colors intermingle and create a harmonious composition.
  • A person describing a social gathering might say, “At the party, guests from different circles intermingled and had engaging conversations.”

11. Interweave

To combine or blend different elements or ideas together to create a cohesive whole.

  • For example, “The author interweaved multiple storylines to create a complex narrative.”
  • In a discussion about cultural influences, one might say, “Different cultures interweave to create a diverse society.”
  • A teacher might encourage students to “interweave different perspectives in their writing to make it more interesting.”
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12. Synthesize

To combine different elements or ideas to form a new and cohesive whole.

  • For instance, in scientific research, one might synthesize various data points to draw a conclusion.
  • In a discussion about music, someone might say, “This song synthesizes elements of jazz and hip-hop.”
  • A student working on a research paper might need to synthesize information from multiple sources to support their argument.

13. Unite

To bring different elements or groups together to form a unified whole.

  • For example, “The organization aims to unite people from diverse backgrounds.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “We need a leader who can unite the country.”
  • A coach might encourage their team to “unite and work together towards a common goal.”

14. Mesh

To fit or combine well together to form a harmonious whole.

  • For instance, in a team project, each member’s strengths and skills should mesh well together.
  • In a discussion about organizational culture, someone might say, “The company’s values and employees’ attitudes should mesh.”
  • A designer might describe a well-designed room as having furniture and decor that “meshes perfectly.”

15. Converge

To come together or meet at a common point or goal.

  • For example, “Ideas from different disciplines can converge to create innovative solutions.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “The Internet of Things allows different devices to converge and communicate.”
  • A business strategy might involve converging different departments to streamline operations.

16. Intertwine

To combine or mix different elements or ideas in a way that they become interconnected or interwoven.

  • For example, “The author skillfully intertwined multiple storylines in the novel.”
  • In a discussion about art, one might say, “The artist’s use of colors and textures intertwines to create a visually stunning piece.”
  • A person might use this slang in a conversation, saying, “Let’s intertwine our ideas to come up with a unique solution.”

17. Interfuse

To mix or blend different elements or concepts so that they become inseparable or indistinguishable.

  • For instance, “The flavors of the spices and herbs infuse and interfuse to create a rich and complex dish.”
  • In a discussion about music, someone might say, “The different genres of music interfuse in this album, creating a unique and innovative sound.”
  • A person might use this term in a conversation, saying, “Let’s interfuse our knowledge and skills to tackle this problem together.”

18. Cojoin

To unite or combine different entities or individuals to work together towards a common goal or objective.

  • For example, “The two companies cojoin to launch a new product.”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, someone might say, “In order to achieve success, it’s important for team members to cojoin their efforts.”
  • A person might use this slang in a conversation, saying, “Let’s cojoin our strengths and resources to create a powerful impact.”

19. Cohere

To come together or unite in a way that creates a strong bond or connection.

  • For instance, “The team members’ shared values and goals cohere to create a cohesive and effective group.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “Trust and communication are important for a couple to cohere.”
  • A person might use this term in a conversation, saying, “Let’s cohere our ideas and thoughts to present a unified front.”

20. Integrate

To combine or incorporate different elements or components into a unified whole.

  • For example, “The new software integrates various features to provide a seamless user experience.”
  • In a discussion about diversity, someone might say, “It’s important to integrate people from different backgrounds and cultures to create a harmonious society.”
  • A person might use this slang in a conversation, saying, “Let’s integrate our knowledge and expertise to come up with a comprehensive solution.”

21. Homogenize

To homogenize means to blend or mix together until uniform or consistent. It can refer to combining different elements or groups to create a cohesive whole.

  • For example, in cooking, you might homogenize the ingredients of a sauce by stirring them together.
  • In a discussion about cultural diversity, someone might argue, “We shouldn’t homogenize different cultures, but rather celebrate their unique contributions.”
  • A business executive might say, “Our goal is to homogenize our brand across all markets to maintain a consistent image.”

22. Interlock

Interlock means to fit together or engage with one another in a way that creates a strong connection or bond. It often implies a seamless integration or joining of different parts.

  • For instance, puzzle pieces interlock to form a complete picture.
  • In a conversation about teamwork, someone might say, “We need to interlock our efforts to achieve our common goal.”
  • A carpenter might explain, “The interlocking joints in this furniture provide added stability and strength.”

23. Combine

To combine means to merge or bring together different elements or entities to form a unified whole. It implies the integration of separate parts into a cohesive unit.

  • For example, in a recipe, you might combine flour, sugar, and eggs to make a cake batter.
  • In a discussion about business strategies, someone might suggest, “Let’s combine our resources to launch a joint venture.”
  • A team leader might say, “We need to combine our individual strengths to achieve success.”

24. Meld

To meld means to blend or merge together harmoniously. It suggests a seamless integration or combination of different elements or ideas.

  • For instance, in music, different instruments meld together to create a beautiful melody.
  • In a discussion about cultural assimilation, someone might argue, “We should embrace diversity and allow different cultures to meld together.”
  • A chef might describe a dish as, “The flavors in this recipe meld perfectly to create a delicious harmony.”

25. Join

To join means to unite or bring together different parts or groups into a single entity. It implies the act of connecting or combining separate elements.

  • For example, puzzle pieces join together to form a complete picture.
  • In a conversation about teamwork, someone might say, “Let’s join forces to accomplish our shared objective.”
  • A community organizer might urge, “We need to join together to address the issues affecting our neighborhood.”

26. Interconnect

To connect or join together to form a network or system. “Interconnect” is often used to describe the integration of different components or systems.

  • For instance, in a discussion about smart homes, someone might say, “These devices interconnect to create a seamless automation experience.”
  • In a conversation about computer networks, a person might explain, “The routers interconnect to provide internet connectivity.”
  • A tech enthusiast might rave, “I love how these gadgets interconnect and enhance each other’s functionality.”

27. Amass

To accumulate or gather a large quantity or number of things. “Amass” is often used to describe the process of bringing together various elements to create a unified whole.

  • For example, in a discussion about data analysis, someone might say, “We need to amass all the relevant information before drawing conclusions.”
  • In a conversation about building a successful team, a manager might emphasize, “We need to amass a diverse group of individuals with different skill sets.”
  • A project coordinator might explain, “Our goal is to amass all the necessary resources to complete the project on time.”

28. Consolidate

To merge or combine different elements or components into a single, unified entity. “Consolidate” is often used to describe the process of integrating separate parts to create a stronger, more efficient whole.

  • For instance, in a discussion about business mergers, someone might say, “The companies decided to consolidate their operations to reduce costs.”
  • In a conversation about personal finances, a financial advisor might suggest, “Consolidate your debts into a single loan to simplify your repayment process.”
  • A team leader might emphasize, “Let’s consolidate our efforts and work together towards a common goal.”

29. Harmonize

To combine or blend different elements or components in a way that creates a pleasing or unified whole. “Harmonize” is often used to describe the process of integrating different ideas, styles, or systems to create a balanced outcome.

  • For example, in a discussion about music, someone might say, “The band members need to harmonize their voices to create a beautiful melody.”
  • In a conversation about interior design, a decorator might explain, “We need to harmonize the colors and textures to create a cohesive look.”
  • A team leader might encourage, “Let’s harmonize our strategies and align our efforts for maximum impact.”

30. Synchronize

To coordinate or align different elements or actions to occur at the same time or in a coordinated manner. “Synchronize” is often used to describe the process of integrating separate activities or events to ensure smooth and efficient operation.

  • For instance, in a discussion about project management, someone might say, “We need to synchronize our tasks to meet the deadline.”
  • In a conversation about music performance, a conductor might instruct, “The musicians need to synchronize their playing to create a cohesive sound.”
  • A logistics manager might emphasize, “We need to synchronize the delivery schedule with the production timeline to avoid delays.”

31. Conflate

To merge or blend multiple elements or ideas into one. “Conflate” is often used to describe the process of merging two or more concepts or pieces of information.

  • For example, a person might say, “Let’s conflate the two ideas and create a new solution.”
  • In a discussion about literature, someone might argue, “The author has cleverly conflated two different genres in this novel.”
  • A student might write, “The study aims to conflate previous research findings to form a comprehensive analysis.”

32. Conjoin

To bring together or join two or more elements or ideas. “Conjoin” is often used to describe the act of merging or combining separate entities into a single entity.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Let’s conjoin our efforts and work together on this project.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might comment, “The artist has conjoined different styles to create a unique masterpiece.”
  • A team leader might instruct, “Conjoin the individual tasks into a cohesive project plan.”

To establish a connection or relationship between two or more elements or ideas. “Link” is often used to describe the act of creating a connection or association.

  • For example, a person might say, “Let’s link these two concepts to demonstrate their relationship.”
  • In a discussion about history, someone might argue, “There is a clear link between these two historical events.”
  • A researcher might state, “The study aims to link previous findings to current trends in the field.”

34. Knit

To weave or blend together different elements or ideas. “Knit” is often used metaphorically to describe the process of integrating or combining separate parts into a unified whole.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Let’s knit these various ideas together to form a coherent argument.”
  • In a discussion about music, someone might comment, “The composer has skillfully knit different musical styles into this composition.”
  • A teacher might explain, “The goal is to knit the individual concepts into a comprehensive understanding of the topic.”

35. Amalgam

A combination or blend of different elements or ideas. “Amalgam” is often used to describe the result of integrating or merging separate parts into a unified whole.

  • For example, a person might say, “This artwork is an amalgam of different artistic styles.”
  • In a discussion about cultures, someone might argue, “This city is an amalgam of various ethnicities and traditions.”
  • A chef might describe a dish as, “An amalgam of flavors from different cuisines.”

36. Intermix

To mix or blend together different elements or substances.

  • For example, “The artist intermixed different colors to create a vibrant painting.”
  • In a recipe, you might be instructed to “intermix the dry ingredients with the wet ingredients.”
  • A DJ might intermix different songs to create a seamless mixtape.
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37. Interpolate

To estimate a value between two known values based on existing data or information.

  • For instance, in mathematics, you might be asked to interpolate the missing value in a sequence.
  • In a survey, data analysts might interpolate missing responses to get a complete dataset.
  • A weather forecaster might interpolate the temperature at a specific time based on the surrounding measurements.

38. Blend in

To become part of a group or environment by adopting its characteristics or behaviors.

  • For example, in a new school, a student might try to blend in with the existing student body.
  • When traveling to a foreign country, it’s helpful to blend in with the local culture.
  • In a professional setting, it’s important to blend in with the company’s values and work culture.

39. Absorb

To take in or assimilate information or experiences.

  • For instance, when reading a book, you absorb the knowledge and ideas presented.
  • In a classroom, students absorb the material taught by the teacher.
  • When traveling, you absorb the culture and customs of the places you visit.

40. Ingrain

To firmly establish something in someone’s mind or make it an integral part of their beliefs or behaviors.

  • For example, a parent might try to ingrain good manners in their child.
  • In a sports team, the coach might try to ingrain a winning mentality in the players.
  • A teacher might aim to ingrain important concepts in their students’ minds.

41. Embed

To incorporate or include something within another thing or system. “Embed” is often used in the context of technology, where it refers to the process of placing content, such as videos or images, within a website or document.

  • For example, a web developer might say, “I will embed the video on the homepage of the website.”
  • A blogger might write, “I embedded a tweet from the event to provide more context.”
  • In a discussion about online articles, someone might comment, “The article should embed links to related resources for further reading.”

42. Infuse

To blend or mix something into another thing to create a unified whole. “Infuse” is often used metaphorically to describe the process of incorporating ideas, values, or qualities into a person or organization.

  • For instance, a chef might say, “I will infuse the dish with the flavors of fresh herbs.”
  • In a discussion about team dynamics, someone might suggest, “We need to infuse our meetings with more energy and creativity.”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “I aim to infuse positivity and inspiration into every audience I speak to.”

43. Intersperse

To mix or distribute something among other things in a scattered or random manner. “Intersperse” is often used to describe the act of incorporating or inserting something at various points within a larger context.

  • For example, a writer might say, “I will intersperse quotes from experts throughout the article.”
  • In a discussion about design, someone might suggest, “Let’s intersperse bold colors throughout the room to create visual interest.”
  • A teacher might explain, “I intersperse group activities with individual work to keep students engaged.”

44. Knit together

To unify or bring together separate elements or parts into a cohesive whole. “Knit together” is often used metaphorically to describe the process of integrating different ideas, components, or groups.

  • For instance, a community organizer might say, “We need to knit together different stakeholders to address this issue.”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, someone might comment, “A strong leader can knit together a diverse group of individuals.”
  • A project manager might explain, “My role is to knit together all the different tasks and ensure they align with the project goals.”

45. Synergize

To collaborate or work together in a way that produces a combined effect greater than the sum of individual efforts. “Synergize” is often used to describe the process of integrating different skills, perspectives, or resources to achieve a common goal.

  • For example, a business consultant might advise, “We need to synergize our marketing and sales teams to maximize results.”
  • In a discussion about innovation, someone might say, “Synergizing diverse ideas can lead to breakthrough solutions.”
  • A team leader might encourage, “Let’s synergize our strengths and leverage each other’s expertise to deliver a high-quality project.”

46. Co-opt

This term refers to the act of taking over or appropriating something, often without permission or consent. It can also mean to adopt or assimilate something for one’s own purposes.

  • For example, “The company co-opted the ideas of the smaller startup without giving them credit.”
  • In a political context, one might say, “The politician co-opted the grassroots movement to gain support.”
  • A person discussing cultural appropriation might argue, “It’s important to recognize when dominant cultures co-opt elements of marginalized cultures.”

47. Interlace

To interlace means to weave or intertwine things together. In the context of integration, it can refer to the process of combining or blending different elements to create a cohesive whole.

  • For instance, “The artist interlaced various colors to create a vibrant painting.”
  • In a discussion about technology, one might say, “The software interlaces different functionalities to provide a seamless user experience.”
  • A person describing a multicultural community might say, “The neighborhood interlaces different cultures and traditions.”

48. Mix in

This term means to incorporate or blend something into a larger whole. It can refer to the act of adding or combining different elements to create a unified result.

  • For example, “The chef mixed in fresh herbs to enhance the flavor of the dish.”
  • In a conversation about music production, one might say, “The producer mixed in electronic beats with traditional instruments.”
  • A person discussing diversity in education might argue, “It’s important to mix in diverse perspectives and experiences to create a well-rounded curriculum.”