Top 52 Slang For Integration – Meaning & Usage

Slang for Integration is a hot topic in today’s diverse society, where cultures and languages intertwine. Whether you’re a global citizen or simply curious about the latest lingo, our team has gathered a list of must-know slang terms that will help you navigate the world of integration with ease. Stay ahead of the curve and expand your vocabulary with this insightful compilation.

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1. Merge

Merge refers to the act of combining two or more things together to form a single entity. It is often used in the context of integrating different elements or ideas.

  • For example, in a business context, a company might merge with another company to form a larger entity.
  • In a discussion about software development, a programmer might say, “We need to merge these two branches of code.”
  • A person talking about cultural integration might use the term, “We need to merge our traditions and values to create a more inclusive society.”

2. Blend

Blend means to mix or combine different elements or substances together to create a unified whole. It is often used to describe the process of integrating different flavors, cultures, or ideas.

  • For instance, a chef might say, “We need to blend these ingredients to create a harmonious flavor.”
  • In a conversation about music, a person might say, “This song blends elements of jazz and hip-hop.”
  • A person discussing racial integration might use the term, “We should blend our diverse backgrounds to create a stronger community.”

3. Fuse

Fuse means to join or unite two or more things together to create a single entity. It is often used to describe the process of integrating different elements or ideas.

  • For example, in a discussion about technology, a person might say, “We need to fuse these two technologies to create a more advanced product.”
  • In a conversation about art, a person might say, “This painting fuses elements of realism and abstraction.”
  • A person discussing social integration might use the term, “We should fuse our cultures and traditions to promote understanding and harmony.”

4. Unify

Unify means to bring together different elements or groups to form a single, cohesive entity. It is often used to describe the process of integrating people, ideas, or organizations.

  • For instance, a political leader might say, “We need to unify the country and work towards a common goal.”
  • In a discussion about sports, a coach might say, “Our team needs to unify and work together to win the championship.”
  • A person discussing community integration might use the term, “We should unify different neighborhoods to create a stronger and more inclusive community.”

5. Incorporate

Incorporate means to include or integrate something into a larger whole. It is often used to describe the process of integrating ideas, concepts, or practices into a system or organization.

  • For example, in a business context, a company might incorporate new technologies to improve efficiency.
  • In a conversation about education, a teacher might say, “We need to incorporate new teaching methods to engage students.”
  • A person discussing cultural integration might use the term, “We should incorporate elements of different cultures to promote diversity and inclusivity.”

6. Assimilate

This term refers to the process of fully integrating into a new culture or community. It implies adopting the customs, values, and behaviors of the majority.

  • For example, an immigrant might say, “I want to assimilate into American society and become a citizen.”
  • In a discussion about diversity, someone might argue, “We should celebrate different cultures, but also encourage newcomers to assimilate.”
  • A person who has successfully assimilated might comment, “I feel like I’ve become a part of this community; I’ve fully assimilated.”

7. Amalgamate

To combine or unite different elements into a single entity. In the context of integration, it refers to bringing together diverse groups or individuals to form a cohesive whole.

  • For instance, a company might say, “We aim to amalgamate our teams to create a more efficient workflow.”
  • In a discussion about cultural integration, someone might suggest, “We should amalgamate different traditions to create a rich and diverse society.”
  • A person who has experienced successful amalgamation might share, “I love how our neighborhood has amalgamated different cultures and created a vibrant community.”

8. Integrate

To bring together or combine different parts into a whole. In the context of integration, it refers to the process of including and accepting individuals or groups into a larger society or organization.

  • For example, a school might say, “We strive to integrate students from diverse backgrounds into our classrooms.”
  • In a discussion about workplace diversity, someone might argue, “Companies should actively integrate employees from different ethnicities and cultures.”
  • A person who has witnessed successful integration might comment, “I’m proud of how our city has integrated different communities and created a harmonious environment.”

9. Meld

To blend or combine different elements, ideas, or cultures into a harmonious whole. It implies a seamless integration that creates a unified entity.

  • For instance, a chef might say, “I love to meld different flavors and create unique dishes.”
  • In a discussion about cultural exchange, someone might suggest, “Let’s meld our traditions and create a beautiful celebration.”
  • A person who has experienced successful melding might share, “I feel like I’ve found my place in this community; we’ve melded together and created something special.”

10. Cohere

To unite or hold different parts together in a cohesive manner. In the context of integration, it refers to the ability of diverse individuals or groups to come together and form a strong bond.

  • For example, a team leader might say, “We need to cohere and work together to achieve our goals.”
  • In a discussion about social integration, someone might argue, “A strong sense of community helps different groups cohere and thrive.”
  • A person who has witnessed successful cohering might comment, “I’m amazed at how well our neighborhood has cohered; we truly support and look out for each other.”

11. Converge

This term refers to different elements or entities coming together or meeting at a common point. It often implies a merging or blending of ideas, opinions, or perspectives.

  • For example, “The team members need to converge on a decision before moving forward.”
  • In a discussion about social movements, one might say, “Various groups are starting to converge on the issue of climate change.”
  • A person discussing technological advancements might mention, “With the rise of artificial intelligence, different fields are starting to converge.”

12. Synthesize

To synthesize means to combine different elements or ideas to create something new or unique. It often involves integrating various components or concepts to form a cohesive whole.

  • For instance, “The artist synthesized different art styles to create a visually stunning masterpiece.”
  • In a scientific context, one might say, “Researchers are trying to synthesize a new drug that can cure a specific disease.”
  • A person discussing music might mention, “The band synthesized elements of rock and electronic music to create their signature sound.”

13. Homogenize

Homogenize refers to the process of making something uniform or consistent by removing variations or differences. It often implies blending or merging different elements to create a homogeneous whole.

  • For example, “Globalization has led to the homogenization of cultures and traditions.”
  • In a discussion about food, one might say, “Fast food chains often homogenize flavors to ensure consistency across locations.”
  • A person discussing urban development might mention, “The city’s architecture has been homogenized, losing its unique character.”

14. Consolidate

Consolidate means to bring together different elements or entities into a single, unified whole. It often involves strengthening or solidifying the integration of various components.

  • For instance, “The company decided to consolidate its operations into one central location.”
  • In a financial context, one might say, “The merger allowed the company to consolidate its market share.”
  • A person discussing government might mention, “The goal is to consolidate power and create a more efficient system.”

15. Harmonize

Harmonize refers to the process of blending or balancing different elements or ideas to create a harmonious or cohesive whole. It often implies the integration of various components to create a pleasing or unified result.

  • For example, “The colors in the painting harmonize perfectly, creating a visually stunning effect.”
  • In a musical context, one might say, “The band members need to harmonize their voices to create a beautiful melody.”
  • A person discussing team dynamics might mention, “Effective collaboration requires the ability to harmonize different perspectives and strengths.”

16. Interfuse

To combine or mix together in a seamless or integrated manner.

  • For example, “The different cultures in this neighborhood interfuse to create a vibrant community.”
  • A person discussing the blending of musical genres might say, “This song seamlessly interfuses elements of jazz and hip-hop.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might comment, “The artist’s use of color and texture allows the different elements to interfuse and create a harmonious composition.”

17. Intermingle

To mix or mingle together, especially different elements or groups.

  • For instance, “In this diverse city, people from all walks of life intermingle and share their cultures.”
  • A person discussing the benefits of intercultural relationships might say, “When people from different backgrounds intermingle, they can learn from each other and broaden their perspectives.”
  • In a discussion about food, someone might comment, “The flavors of these ingredients intermingle to create a unique and delicious dish.”

18. Unite

To bring together or join different elements or groups to form a cohesive whole.

  • For example, “The goal of this organization is to unite people from all backgrounds and work towards a common cause.”
  • A person discussing the power of unity might say, “When we unite, we can accomplish great things and create positive change.”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, someone might comment, “In order to succeed, we need to unite our strengths and work together towards a shared goal.”

19. Coalesce

To come together or merge into one entity or group.

  • For instance, “Over time, the different cultures in this city have coalesced to create a unique identity.”
  • A person discussing the formation of alliances might say, “The political parties coalesced to form a united front against their common opponent.”
  • In a discussion about scientific theories, someone might comment, “Different pieces of evidence coalesce to support a unified explanation.”

20. Amass

To gather or collect a large amount of something.

  • For example, “The organization has amassed a wealth of knowledge and expertise in this field.”
  • A person discussing wealth accumulation might say, “He has worked hard to amass a fortune over the years.”
  • In a discussion about resources, someone might comment, “We need to amass enough funds to support our project.”

21. Conflate

To combine or merge two separate ideas, concepts, or things into one. The term is often used when discussing the blending or confusion of different elements.

  • For example, “Don’t conflate my argument with someone else’s. They are two separate viewpoints.”
  • In a political debate, one might accuse their opponent of conflating two unrelated issues.
  • A writer might caution against conflation by saying, “Let’s be careful not to conflate correlation with causation.”

22. Join forces

To come together and work together towards a common goal. This phrase is often used to emphasize the power and effectiveness of collaboration.

  • For instance, “Let’s join forces and tackle this project together.”
  • In a team meeting, a leader might say, “We need to join forces and pool our resources to achieve success.”
  • A group of activists might decide to join forces with another organization to amplify their impact.
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23. Cojoin

To connect or link two or more things together. The term implies a strong bond or unity between the entities being joined.

  • For example, “The two companies cojoin their efforts to create a groundbreaking product.”
  • In a discussion about partnerships, someone might say, “Cojoining our resources will lead to greater success.”
  • A team leader might encourage their members to cojoin their skills and strengths to achieve the desired outcome.

24. Conjoin

To combine or unite two or more things together. The term implies a close association or connection between the entities being conjoined.

  • For instance, “The artist conjoins different art forms to create a unique masterpiece.”
  • In a conversation about music, someone might say, “The band conjoins different genres to create their distinctive sound.”
  • A chef might experiment with conjoining different flavors to create a new and exciting dish.

25. Intertwine

To twist or weave together two or more things, creating a complex and interconnected structure. The term often conveys a sense of interdependence and mutual influence.

  • For example, “The characters’ storylines intertwine throughout the novel.”
  • In a discussion about history, someone might say, “The events of the two world wars intertwine in many ways.”
  • A biologist might explain, “The roots of these plants intertwine to provide stability and support.”

26. Knit together

This phrase means to bring different elements or people together to form a cohesive whole. It can be used to describe the process of integrating different parts into a unified entity.

  • For example, “The diverse group of students knitted together to create a strong and supportive community.”
  • In a business context, one might say, “The departments need to knit together their efforts to achieve the company’s goals.”
  • A community organizer might encourage residents to “knit together” their resources and talents to improve their neighborhood.
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This slang phrase is used to describe the act of connecting or joining different elements or people together. It can refer to physical connections or the coming together of individuals or groups.

  • For instance, “Let’s link up later and discuss our plans.”
  • In a technological context, one might say, “I need to link up my devices to transfer the data.”
  • A community organizer might encourage different organizations to “link up” and collaborate on a project.

28. Pool resources

This phrase means to bring together and share available resources, such as money, materials, or skills, for a common purpose. It emphasizes the idea of collective action and cooperation.

  • For example, “The families decided to pool their resources to buy a bigger car.”
  • In a business context, one might say, “Let’s pool our resources to launch a new product.”
  • A community organization might encourage residents to “pool resources” to fund a community event.

29. Team up

This slang phrase means to come together and work as a team or collaborate on a project. It emphasizes the idea of individuals joining forces to achieve a common goal.

  • For instance, “Let’s team up and tackle this project together.”
  • In a sports context, one might say, “The two star players decided to team up and play on the same team.”
  • A group of friends might decide to “team up” for a game night and compete against other teams.

30. Work in tandem

This phrase means to work closely together in a coordinated manner, often with a specific goal in mind. It emphasizes the idea of individuals or groups working in sync with each other.

  • For example, “The two departments worked in tandem to complete the project on time.”
  • In a musical context, one might say, “The guitar and drums need to work in tandem to create a tight rhythm.”
  • A project manager might encourage team members to “work in tandem” to ensure smooth execution of tasks.

31. Collaborate

When people collaborate, they work together to achieve a common goal or complete a task. It often involves sharing ideas, resources, and responsibilities.

  • For example, “Let’s collaborate on this project and combine our expertise.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might suggest, “We should collaborate with the marketing department to create a more effective campaign.”
  • A manager might say, “Collaboration is key to fostering innovation and productivity in the workplace.”

32. Coordinate

To coordinate means to organize and manage different elements or activities to ensure they work together smoothly and efficiently.

  • For instance, “We need to coordinate the schedules of all team members to find a suitable meeting time.”
  • In event planning, someone might say, “I’ll coordinate with the caterers, decorators, and sound technicians to ensure everything is in place.”
  • A project manager might explain, “Coordinating tasks and deadlines is crucial for project success.”

33. Intersperse

Intersperse means to mix or scatter something among other things, usually in a random or varied manner.

  • For example, “The artist interspersed bright colors throughout the painting.”
  • In writing, someone might say, “I like to intersperse humor in my articles to keep readers engaged.”
  • A chef might suggest, “Intersperse fresh herbs between layers of the dish for added flavor.”

34. Mesh

When things mesh, they fit together harmoniously or work well together as a unified whole.

  • For instance, “Their personalities meshed perfectly, and they became great friends.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We need to ensure our strategies mesh with the company’s overall goals.”
  • A coach might explain, “In team sports, players need to mesh their skills and communication to achieve success.”

35. Synchronize

To synchronize means to coordinate or align the timing of different events, actions, or processes.

  • For example, “We need to synchronize our watches before the mission.”
  • In music, someone might say, “The band needs to practice to synchronize their playing.”
  • A project manager might instruct, “Let’s synchronize the delivery dates of each phase to ensure a smooth workflow.”

36. Interlock

Interlock refers to the act of connecting or fitting together. It can be used to describe the integration of different parts or elements.

  • For example, “The gears interlock to create a smooth and efficient mechanism.”
  • In a discussion about puzzle pieces, someone might say, “The interlocking design ensures that the pieces stay together.”
  • A person describing a close-knit community might say, “The residents interlock and support each other in times of need.”

37. Interweave

Interweave means to blend or intertwine different elements together. It is often used to describe the integration of different ideas, concepts, or materials.

  • For instance, “The author skillfully interweaves various storylines to create a compelling narrative.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might say, “The artist interweaves different textures and colors to create a visually stunning piece.”
  • A person describing a multicultural society might say, “The diverse cultures interweave to form a rich tapestry of traditions and perspectives.”

38. Coact

Coact means to collaborate or work together towards a common goal. It can be used to describe the integration of efforts or actions.

  • For example, “The team members coact to complete the project on time.”
  • In a discussion about theater, someone might say, “The actors coact seamlessly to deliver a powerful performance.”
  • A person describing a successful partnership might say, “The two companies coact to innovate and create groundbreaking products.”

39. Coexist

Coexist refers to the act of existing together harmoniously. It is often used to describe the integration of different groups, beliefs, or cultures.

  • For instance, “People of different religions can coexist peacefully in a diverse society.”
  • In a discussion about wildlife, someone might say, “Humans and animals can coexist in their natural habitats.”
  • A person describing a tolerant community might say, “The residents coexist and celebrate each other’s differences.”

40. Coevolve

Coevolve means to evolve together or influence each other’s evolution. It is often used to describe the integration of different species or systems.

  • For example, “Flowers and their pollinators coevolve through a mutually beneficial relationship.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “As society evolves, our relationship with technology coevolves as well.”
  • A person describing a dynamic ecosystem might say, “The different species coevolve and adapt to changes in their environment.”

41. Cohabit

This term refers to two or more people living together in the same space, typically in a romantic or domestic relationship. It implies sharing a living arrangement and responsibilities.

  • For example, a friend might say, “My partner and I have decided to cohabit and get an apartment together.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might ask, “How long did you cohabit before getting married?”
  • A person seeking advice might inquire, “What are the pros and cons of cohabiting before marriage?”

42. Co-occur

This term describes two or more events or phenomena happening at the same time or coinciding with each other. It implies a correlation or simultaneous occurrence.

  • For instance, in a scientific study, researchers might observe, “These two variables co-occur frequently.”
  • In a discussion about weather patterns, someone might say, “Thunderstorms often co-occur with heavy rainfall.”
  • A person explaining a coincidence might mention, “It’s interesting how these two events co-occur every year.”

43. Co-own

This term refers to multiple individuals or entities jointly owning a property, asset, or business. It implies a shared responsibility and decision-making.

  • For example, in a business partnership, the partners might co-own the company.
  • In a discussion about real estate, someone might mention, “We decided to co-own the vacation home with our friends.”
  • A person explaining a joint purchase might say, “We’re going to co-own the car and split the expenses.”

44. Co-create

This term describes the process of two or more individuals working together to create something, whether it be a piece of art, a project, or an idea. It implies a joint effort and contribution.

  • For instance, in a design team, members might co-create a new product.
  • In a discussion about innovation, someone might suggest, “Let’s co-create a solution to this problem.”
  • A person describing a collaborative project might say, “We’re going to co-create a presentation for the conference.”

45. Co-manage

This term refers to the act of multiple individuals sharing management responsibilities for a team, organization, or project. It implies a collaborative approach to decision-making and leadership.

  • For example, in a business, partners might co-manage the company.
  • In a discussion about teamwork, someone might say, “We need to co-manage this project to ensure its success.”
  • A person explaining a shared leadership model might mention, “We co-manage our team by dividing tasks and making decisions together.”

46. Intermesh

This term refers to the act of mixing or combining different elements or components together. It can also describe the process of integrating or interconnecting various systems or networks.

  • For example, in a discussion about technology, one might say, “The software seamlessly intermeshes with existing systems.”
  • A person describing a successful collaboration might say, “The team was able to intermesh their ideas and create a cohesive project.”
  • In a conversation about urban planning, someone might discuss how different urban areas intermesh to create a diverse cityscape.
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47. Intersystem

This term refers to the interaction or connection between different systems or networks. It can describe the integration or interoperation of multiple systems to work together.

  • For instance, in a discussion about computer networks, one might say, “The new software allows for seamless intersystem communication.”
  • A person describing the integration of different departments in an organization might say, “We need to establish better intersystem collaboration for more efficient operations.”
  • In a conversation about transportation, someone might discuss the need for improved intersystem connectivity between different modes of transport.

48. Intercalate

This term refers to the act of inserting or interposing something between two existing elements or entities. It can also describe the process of integrating or including additional information or content within an existing structure.

  • For example, in a discussion about chemistry, one might say, “The new molecule intercalates between the existing atoms.”
  • A person describing the addition of new scenes in a movie might say, “We decided to intercalate a flashback sequence to provide more context.”
  • In a conversation about academic research, someone might discuss how they intercalated new findings into their existing study.

49. Intercross

This term refers to the act of crossing or blending different elements or entities together. It can also describe the process of integrating or combining different traits or characteristics.

  • For instance, in a discussion about genetics, one might say, “The intercross of different breeds resulted in unique offspring.”
  • A person describing the blending of different cultural influences might say, “The intercross of traditions created a vibrant and diverse community.”
  • In a conversation about music, someone might discuss how genres intercross to create new and innovative sounds.

50. Interspace

This term refers to the space or gap between two objects or entities. It can also describe the area or region that exists between different systems or components.

  • For example, in a discussion about architecture, one might say, “The design incorporates multiple interspaces to create an open and airy atmosphere.”
  • A person describing the space between different teeth might say, “The orthodontist recommended braces to close the interspaces.”
  • In a conversation about urban planning, someone might discuss the need for green interspaces to provide recreational areas for residents.

51. Intervene

To intervene means to step in and become involved in a situation, especially in order to prevent something from happening or to make a positive impact. It can also refer to taking action or interfering in a situation.

  • For example, if you see someone being bullied, you might intervene to stop the bullying and protect the victim.
  • In a political context, a country might intervene in another country’s affairs to promote peace or stability.
  • A parent might intervene in their child’s behavior by setting boundaries and consequences.

52. Mix

To mix means to combine or blend different elements or substances together. It can also refer to interacting with people from different backgrounds or cultures.

  • For instance, when baking a cake, you need to mix the ingredients together to create the batter.
  • In a social context, attending a diverse university allows students to mix with people from various backgrounds.
  • A music producer might mix different tracks to create a unique sound.