Top 62 Slang For Italian – Meaning & Usage

Italian, the language of love and passion, is not only known for its delicious cuisine and beautiful landscapes, but also for its vibrant slang. Whether you’re planning a trip to Italy or simply want to expand your linguistic repertoire, this listicle is here to help you navigate through the colorful world of Italian slang. From everyday expressions to trendy phrases, we’ve got you covered. So, get ready to add some flair to your Italian conversations and impress your friends with your newfound linguistic skills!

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1. Mollare qualcuno

This phrase is used to describe ending a romantic relationship or breaking up with someone. It can also be used in a more general sense to mean abandoning or leaving someone or something behind.

  • For example, “Ho mollato qualcuno perché non mi faceva più felice” (I dumped someone because they no longer made me happy).
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “Sei sicuro che vuoi mollare qualcuno così speciale?” (Are you sure you want to dump someone so special?).
  • A friend might advise, “Se ti fa soffrire, è meglio mollare qualcuno e trovare qualcun altro” (If they make you suffer, it’s better to dump someone and find someone else).

2. Essere nelle nuvole

This phrase is used to describe someone who is daydreaming, not paying attention, or not grounded in reality. It can also mean being absent-minded or having a lack of focus.

  • For instance, “Oggi sono stato tutto il giorno nelle nuvole” (Today I was in the clouds all day).
  • In a conversation about someone not paying attention, one might say, “Non puoi essere sempre nelle nuvole, devi concentrarti” (You can’t always be in the clouds, you need to focus).
  • A teacher might scold a student, saying, “Sei sempre nelle nuvole, devi prestare attenzione” (You’re always in the clouds, you need to pay attention).

3. Ricco sfondato

This phrase is used to describe someone who is extremely wealthy or has a lot of money. It emphasizes the abundance of wealth and can be used both literally and figuratively.

  • For example, “Quella famiglia è ricca sfondato, hanno una villa in ogni paese” (That family is filthy rich, they have a villa in every country).
  • In a conversation about someone’s wealth, one might say, “È impossibile sapere quanto sia ricco sfondato” (It’s impossible to know how filthy rich he is).
  • A jealous friend might comment, “Vorrei essere ricco sfondato come lui” (I wish I were as filthy rich as him).

4. Veloce come un razzo

This phrase is used to describe something or someone that is extremely fast or quick. It compares the speed to that of a rocket, emphasizing the rapidity.

  • For instance, “Quel motociclista va veloce come un razzo” (That motorcyclist is fast as a rocket).
  • In a conversation about a race, one might say, “Il vincitore è stato veloce come un razzo” (The winner was fast as a rocket).
  • A fan might exclaim, “Quel giocatore è veloce come un razzo, nessuno riesce a fermarlo” (That player is fast as a rocket, no one can stop him).

5. Amore a prima vista

This phrase is used to describe the feeling of falling in love with someone or something immediately upon first encountering them. It suggests a strong and instantaneous attraction or connection.

  • For example, “Quando l’ho visto, è stato amore a prima vista” (When I saw him, it was love at first sight).
  • In a conversation about romantic experiences, one might say, “Non credo all’amore a prima vista, penso che sia solo attrazione fisica” (I don’t believe in love at first sight, I think it’s just physical attraction).
  • A friend might share their own love story, saying, “Ho incontrato mio marito e è stato amore a prima vista, non ho mai provato niente del genere” (I met my husband and it was love at first sight, I’ve never felt anything like it).

6. Alito puzzolente

This phrase translates to “stinky breath” in English. It is used to describe someone who has unpleasant breath.

  • For example, a person might say, “Ho incontrato un ragazzo con l’alito puzzolente” which means “I met a guy with bad breath.”
  • Another example is, “Mi dispiace, ma il tuo alito puzzolente mi disturba” which means “I’m sorry, but your bad breath bothers me.”
  • Someone might joke, “Il mio cane ha un alito puzzolente come un uomo” which means “My dog has breath as stinky as a man’s.”

7. Guastafesta

This term is used to describe someone who ruins the fun or excitement at a party or social gathering.

  • For instance, if someone refuses to participate in the activities and brings down the mood, they might be called a “guastafesta.”
  • In a conversation about a disappointing event, someone might say, “È stato un guastafesta” which means “It was a party pooper.”
  • Another example is, “Non invitare Giovanni alla festa, è un vero guastafesta” which means “Don’t invite Giovanni to the party, he’s a real party pooper.”

8. Basta, basta

This phrase is used to express the desire for something to stop or to indicate that someone has had enough of a certain situation.

  • For example, if someone is annoying you and you want them to stop, you might say “Basta, basta!” which means “Enough, enough!”
  • In a conversation about a frustrating experience, someone might say, “Non ce la faccio più, basta, basta!” which means “I can’t take it anymore, enough, enough!”
  • Another example is, “Basta, basta con le scuse” which means “Enough, enough with the excuses.”

9. Vaffanculo!

This phrase is a strong and offensive way to tell someone to go away or to express anger and frustration towards them.

  • For instance, if someone is bothering you and you want them to leave, you might say “Vaffanculo!” which means “F**k off!”
  • In a heated argument, someone might yell, “Vaffanculo, non voglio più vederti!” which means “F**k off, I don’t want to see you anymore!”
  • Another example is, “Mi ha insultato e gli ho detto di vaffanculo” which means “He insulted me and I told him to f**k off.”

10. Essere al verde

This phrase translates to “to be in the green” in English, but it actually means the opposite. It is used to describe someone who has no money or is financially struggling.

  • For example, if someone asks you to go out and you can’t afford it, you might say “Mi dispiace, sono al verde” which means “I’m sorry, I’m broke.”
  • In a conversation about financial difficulties, someone might say, “Dopo le vacanze, sono rimasto al verde” which means “After the holidays, I ended up broke.”
  • Another example is, “Non posso permettermelo, sono completamente al verde” which means “I can’t afford it, I’m completely broke.”

11. Mettere La Paglia Vicino Al Fuoco

This phrase is used to describe someone who is exacerbating a situation or making it worse.

  • For example, if two people are arguing and someone starts instigating and making provocative comments, you might say, “He’s just putting straw near the fire.”
  • In a political debate, someone might accuse their opponent of “putting straw near the fire” by making false or inflammatory statements.
  • A parent might warn their child, “Don’t put straw near the fire” when they see them provoking their sibling.

12. Essere Del Gatto

This phrase is used to describe someone who is clever, cunning, or sly.

  • For instance, if someone manages to outsmart their opponent in a game or competition, you might say, “He’s really ‘del gatto’.”
  • In a business negotiation, someone might be praised for being ‘del gatto’ when they manage to secure a better deal for themselves.
  • A friend might jokingly say, “Watch out for him, he’s ‘del gatto’ and always one step ahead.”

13. A Fagiolo

This phrase is used to describe something that is precise, accurate, or on point.

  • For example, if someone gives a presentation and all the information is correct and well-delivered, you might say, “His presentation was ‘a fagiolo’.”
  • When someone answers a question correctly or solves a problem accurately, you can say, “You got it ‘a fagiolo’.”
  • A chef might describe a perfectly cooked dish as “cooked ‘a fagiolo'”.
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15. Facimme ‘Na Cosa ‘E Juòrne

This phrase is used to encourage or motivate someone to do something extraordinary or impressive.

  • For example, if a group of friends is planning an adventurous trip, someone might say, “Let’s ‘facimme ‘na cosa ‘e juòrne’!”
  • When someone is hesitant to take on a challenging task, you can say, “‘Facimme ‘na cosa ‘e juòrne’! You can do it!”
  • A coach might use this phrase to inspire their team before an important game or competition.

16. Bedda/Beddo

Bedda or Beddo is a slang term used to describe something or someone as beautiful or attractive. It is derived from the Italian word “bella” which means beautiful.

  • For example, “She looks absolutely bedda in that dress!”
  • A person might compliment a friend by saying, “You’re looking beddo today!”
  • In a romantic context, someone might say, “You are my bedda.”

17. Ciao

Ciao is a versatile slang term commonly used in Italian to say hello or goodbye. It is widely recognized and used in various parts of the world.

  • For instance, when meeting a friend, you might say, “Ciao! How are you?”
  • In a casual setting, someone might say, “Ciao, see you later!”
  • A person might use “Ciao” in a message or email to say goodbye,“Ciao” in a message or email to say goodbye, such as “Ciao, talk to you soon!”

18. Prego

Prego is a versatile slang term used in Italian to mean “you’re welcome” or “please.” It is often used in response to “thank you” or to politely offer assistance.

  • For example, if someone thanks you, you can reply with “Prego” to mean “you’re welcome.”
  • In a restaurant setting, a waiter might say “Prego” when serving a dish or offering something to a customer.
  • When asking someone to pass something, you can say “Prego” as a polite way of saying “please.”

19. Bella

Bella is a slang term used to describe something or someone as beautiful or attractive in Italian. It is commonly used to compliment someone’s appearance.

  • For instance, you might say “She looks bella in that outfit!”
  • A person might compliment a friend by saying, “You’re looking bella today!”
  • In a romantic context, someone might say, “You are my bella.”

20. Mamma mia

Mamma mia is an Italian slang expression used to convey surprise, shock, or disbelief. It is often used in a lighthearted or humorous manner.

  • For example, if someone tells you an unbelievable story, you might exclaim “Mamma mia!”
  • In a funny situation, someone might say, “Mamma mia, that was hilarious!”
  • When expressing astonishment, a person might exclaim, “Mamma mia, I can’t believe it!”

21. Bambino

This term translates to “child” in English. It is often used as a term of endearment for a young boy or as a playful nickname.

  • For example, a parent might say, “Come here, bambino, it’s time for dinner.”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might ask, “How many bambinos do you have?”
  • A friend might tease, “Hey there, bambino, want to play some soccer?”

22. Amore

This word means “love” in English. It is commonly used as a term of endearment for a romantic partner or to express affection.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Ti amo, amore mio” which translates to “I love you, my love.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might ask, “How long have you been with your amore?”
  • A friend might say, “Good luck on your date tonight, amore!”

23. Figo

This slang term translates to “cool” in English. It is used to describe something or someone as impressive, fashionable, or desirable.

  • For example, a person might say, “That new car is figo!”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might comment, “Those shoes are really figo.”
  • A friend might say, “You’re going to love this restaurant, it’s really figo.”

24. Capisce

This word translates to “understand” in English. It is often used to check if someone comprehends or agrees with what has been said.

  • For instance, a person might say, “We’re meeting at 7, capisce?”
  • In a conversation about instructions, someone might ask, “Capisce how to operate the machine?”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll explain the plan one more time, capisce?”

25. Vaffanculo

This is a strong Italian curse word that literally translates to “go f**k yourself” in English. It is a highly offensive and vulgar expression used to express anger or contempt towards someone.

  • For example, in a heated argument, someone might say, “Vaffanculo!”
  • In a conversation about rude behavior, someone might exclaim, “Can you believe he told me to vaffanculo?”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “If you don’t help me move this weekend, I’ll tell you to vaffanculo!”

26. Aperitivo

In Italian culture, an aperitivo is a pre-dinner drink or cocktail that is meant to stimulate the appetite. It is often accompanied by small snacks or appetizers. Aperitivo is a social tradition in Italy, where friends and family gather to enjoy drinks and light bites before dinner.

  • For example, “Let’s meet for an aperitivo before dinner.”
  • A person might say, “I love the Italian tradition of aperitivo. It’s a great way to unwind after work.”
  • A traveler might ask, “Where’s the best place to experience aperitivo in Rome?”

27. Dolce vita

Dolce vita is an Italian phrase that translates to “sweet life” in English. It refers to a carefree and luxurious lifestyle, often associated with enjoying the finer things in life. The term became popular in the 1960s thanks to the film “La Dolce Vita” directed by Federico Fellini.

  • For instance, “I’m dreaming of living the dolce vita in Italy.”
  • A person might say, “I’m ready for a vacation filled with dolce vita.”
  • A travel blogger might write, “Experience the dolce vita in the beautiful coastal towns of Italy.”

28. Scusi

Scusi is an Italian word that translates to “excuse me” in English. It is used to get someone’s attention or to apologize for a mistake or inconvenience. The word is commonly used in Italy in various situations, such as when asking for directions or when trying to get through a crowded place.

  • For example, “Scusi, can you tell me where the nearest train station is?”
  • A person might say, “Scusi, I didn’t mean to bump into you.”
  • A traveler might ask, “Scusi, is this seat taken?”

29. Basta

Basta is an Italian word that translates to “enough” or “stop” in English. It is used to express a strong desire for something to end or to indicate that a specific limit has been reached. The word can be used in various contexts, such as to stop someone from talking or to indicate that a particular action should cease.

  • For instance, “Basta! I can’t take it anymore.”
  • A person might say, “Basta with the excuses. Just get the job done.”
  • A parent might say, “Basta! No more TV for today.”

30. Bravissimo

Bravissimo is an Italian word that is used to express great praise or admiration for someone’s achievement or performance. It is an enthusiastic way of saying “very good” or “well done” in English. The word is commonly used to applaud someone’s talent, skill, or success.

  • For example, “Bravissimo! You did an amazing job.”
  • A person might say, “Bravissimo! You deserve all the applause.”
  • A music critic might write, “The pianist’s performance was bravissimo, leaving the audience in awe.”

31. Pizzaiolo

This term refers to a professional pizza chef or a person who specializes in making pizzas. “Pizzaiolo” is the masculine form, while “pizzaiola” is the feminine form.

  • For example, “The pizzaiolo at this restaurant makes the best Neapolitan-style pizzas.”
  • A food critic might write, “The pizzaiolo’s skill in crafting the perfect crust is evident in every bite.”
  • A person might say, “I’m learning to make homemade pizza from a pizzaiolo in Italy.”

32. Gelato

Gelato is a frozen dessert that originated in Italy. It is similar to ice cream but has a denser and creamier texture. Gelato is typically made with milk, sugar, and various flavors.

  • For instance, “I had a scoop of pistachio gelato for dessert.”
  • A person might say, “Gelato is the perfect treat on a hot summer day.”
  • A gelato shop owner might advertise, “We have over 20 flavors of homemade gelato to choose from.”

33. Bello

This word is commonly used to describe someone or something as beautiful or handsome in Italian. It can be used to compliment a person’s appearance or to express admiration for something visually pleasing.

  • For example, “You look bello in that suit.”
  • A person might say, “The sunset over the ocean is so bello.”
  • A tourist visiting Italy might exclaim, “The architecture in Rome is absolutely bello!”

34. Nonna

Nonna is the Italian word for grandmother. It is a term of endearment used to refer to one’s maternal or paternal grandmother.

  • For instance, “I learned how to make pasta from my nonna.”
  • A person might say, “My nonna always tells the best stories.”
  • A grandchild might affectionately say, “I love spending time with my nonna.”

35. Cappuccino

Cappuccino is a popular Italian coffee drink made with espresso and frothed milk. It is typically served in a small cup and is often consumed in the morning or after a meal.

  • For example, “I always start my day with a cappuccino.”
  • A person might say, “The barista at this cafe makes the best cappuccino.”
  • A coffee lover might comment, “I can’t resist a perfectly frothed cappuccino.”

36. Piacere

This is a common Italian phrase used to express pleasure or satisfaction when meeting someone for the first time. It is often used as a greeting or introduction.

  • For example, when meeting someone new, you might say, “Piacere di conoscerti” which translates to “Nice to meet you.”
  • In a formal setting, such as a business meeting, you might say, “Piacere di fare la sua conoscenza” which means “Pleased to make your acquaintance.”
  • When introducing yourself to someone, you might say, “Mi chiamo Marco, piacere” which translates to “My name is Marco, nice to meet you.”

37. Salute

This is an Italian word used to toast or raise a glass in celebration or good wishes. It is commonly used when drinking with friends or during special occasions.

  • For instance, when toasting at a wedding, you might say, “Salute e felicità” which means “Cheers and happiness.”
  • When raising a glass with friends, you might simply say, “Salute!” to express good wishes.
  • In a formal setting, such as a business dinner, you might say, “Facciamo un brindisi, salute!” which translates to “Let’s make a toast, cheers!”

38. Grazie

This is the Italian word for “thank you” and is used to express gratitude or appreciation. It is a common phrase used in everyday conversations.

  • For example, when someone does you a favor, you might say, “Grazie mille” which means “Thank you very much.”
  • When receiving a gift, you could say, “Grazie per il regalo” which translates to “Thank you for the gift.”
  • In a restaurant, after being served a delicious meal, you might say, “Grazie, è stato buonissimo” which means “Thank you, it was delicious.”

39. Buon appetito

This is an Italian phrase used to wish someone a good appetite or to enjoy their meal. It is commonly said before starting a meal or when serving food to others.

  • For instance, when sitting down to eat with friends or family, you might say, “Buon appetito a tutti” which means “Enjoy your meal, everyone.”
  • When serving a plate of pasta to a guest, you could say, “Ecco a lei, buon appetito” which translates to “Here you go, enjoy your meal.”
  • In a restaurant, the waiter might say, “Buon appetito” as they bring your food to the table.
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40. Faccia di culo

This is an Italian slang phrase that translates to “asshole” in English. It is a derogatory term used to insult or criticize someone’s behavior or character.

  • For example, if someone cuts you off in traffic, you might say, “Che faccia di culo!” to express your frustration.
  • When talking about someone who is rude or disrespectful, you could say, “È proprio una faccia di culo” which means “He/She is really an asshole.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might say to another, “Non sopporto la tua faccia di culo” which translates to “I can’t stand your asshole behavior.”

41. Vino

Vino is the Italian word for wine. It is commonly used to refer to any type of wine, whether red, white, or sparkling.

  • For example, a person might say, “Let’s have a glass of vino with dinner.”
  • In a restaurant, a waiter might ask, “Would you like to see our vino menu?”
  • A wine enthusiast might comment, “Italian vino is known for its quality and variety.”

42. Tiramisu

Tiramisu is a popular Italian dessert made with layers of ladyfingers, mascarpone cheese, and coffee. The word “tiramisu” translates to “pick-me-up” in Italian, referring to the energizing and indulgent nature of the dessert.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I could really use a slice of tiramisu right now.”
  • When ordering dessert at an Italian restaurant, a customer might ask, “Do you have tiramisu on the menu?”
  • A food blogger might write, “Tiramisu is the perfect pick-me-up after a long day.”

43. Basta cosi

Basta cosi is an Italian phrase that translates to “that’s enough” in English. It is commonly used to indicate that something is sufficient or that a certain limit has been reached.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’ve had enough pasta for today, basta cosi.”
  • When someone is talking too much, another person might say, “Okay, basta cosi, let’s move on.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “You’ve played outside for a while, basta cosi, it’s time to come in.”

44. Pasticceria

Pasticceria is the Italian word for pastry shop. It refers to a place where various types of pastries, cakes, and desserts are made and sold.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Let’s stop by the pasticceria and get some cannoli.”
  • When looking for a special dessert, a customer might ask, “Where is the nearest pasticceria?”
  • A pastry chef might say, “I’ve always dreamed of opening my own pasticceria.”

45. Osteria

Osteria is an Italian word that translates to “tavern” in English. It refers to a casual restaurant or eating establishment where simple and traditional Italian dishes are served.

  • For example, a person might say, “Let’s grab dinner at the osteria down the street.”
  • When looking for a place to eat, a group might ask, “Is there an osteria nearby?”
  • A food critic might write, “The osteria offers a cozy and authentic dining experience.”

46. Amico

This is the Italian word for “friend”. It is commonly used to refer to a close friend or companion.

  • For example, “Ciao, amico!” means “Hello, friend!”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Grazie, amico mio,” which translates to “Thank you, my friend.”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “Lasciami presentarti il mio amico,” meaning “Let me introduce you to my friend.”

47. Nonno

This is the Italian word for “grandfather”. It is used to refer to one’s paternal or maternal grandfather.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Mio nonno è molto saggio,” which means “My grandfather is very wise.”
  • In a family gathering, someone might ask, “Dove si trova il nonno?” meaning “Where is grandfather?”
  • A person might share a childhood memory by saying, “Mi ricordo quando giocavo con il nonno,” which translates to “I remember when I used to play with my grandfather.”

48. Pizza

This is the Italian word for “pizza”. It refers to the famous Italian dish consisting of a yeasted flatbread topped with various ingredients and baked in an oven.

  • For example, “Mi piace la pizza margherita,” means “I like margherita pizza.”
  • In a restaurant, someone might say, “Vorrei una pizza con prosciutto e funghi,” which translates to “I would like a pizza with ham and mushrooms.”
  • A person might share their love for pizza by saying, “La pizza è il mio cibo preferito,” meaning “Pizza is my favorite food.”

49. Spaghetti

This is the Italian word for “spaghetti”. It refers to a type of pasta that is long and thin in shape.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Mi piace mangiare gli spaghetti al pomodoro,” which means “I like to eat spaghetti with tomato sauce.”
  • In a recipe, one might read, “Cuocere gli spaghetti in acqua salata,” which translates to “Cook the spaghetti in salted water.”
  • A person might share their favorite pasta dish by saying, “Gli spaghetti alla carbonara sono deliziosi,” meaning “Spaghetti carbonara is delicious.”

50. Espresso

This is the Italian word for “espresso”. It refers to a strong coffee drink made by forcing hot water through finely ground coffee beans.

  • For example, someone might say, “Prendo sempre un espresso dopo pranzo,” which means “I always have an espresso after lunch.”
  • In a coffee shop, one might order, “Un caffè espresso per favore,” which translates to “An espresso, please.”
  • A person might express their love for espresso by saying, “Mi piace il sapore intenso dell’espresso,” meaning “I like the strong flavor of espresso.”

51. Pizzeria

A restaurant or establishment that specializes in making and serving pizzas. Pizzeria is commonly used to refer to a casual dining restaurant where pizzas are the main attraction.

  • For example, “Let’s go grab a slice at the local pizzeria.”
  • A person discussing their favorite food might say, “I could eat pizza from the pizzeria down the street every day.”
  • Someone might recommend a pizzeria to a friend, saying, “You have to try the deep-dish pizza at this pizzeria, it’s amazing!”

52. Trattoria

A type of Italian restaurant that serves simple, home-style dishes. Trattoria is often used to describe a cozy, family-owned restaurant that offers a relaxed and informal dining experience.

  • For instance, “Let’s have dinner at that charming trattoria we passed by.”
  • A food critic might write, “The trattoria’s menu features traditional Italian dishes made with fresh, locally sourced ingredients.”
  • Someone might recommend a trattoria to a friend, saying, “You have to try the homemade pasta at this trattoria, it’s delicious!”

53. Ristorante

A general term for a restaurant, but often used to describe a more formal and upscale dining establishment. Ristorante is typically associated with fine dining and offers a refined culinary experience.

  • For example, “We celebrated our anniversary at a fancy ristorante downtown.”
  • A food blogger might write, “The ristorante’s menu showcases innovative dishes with exquisite presentation.”
  • A person might recommend a ristorante to a friend, saying, “If you’re looking for a special dining experience, you should try this ristorante.”

54. Piazza

A term used to describe a public square or plaza in Italian. In slang, piazza can refer to a gathering place or a spot where people hang out and socialize.

  • For instance, “Let’s meet up at the piazza later and grab a coffee.”
  • A person might say, “The piazza in this town is always buzzing with activity.”
  • A tourist might ask a local, “Where’s the best piazza to visit in this city?”

55. Panini

A type of Italian sandwich made with Italian bread, typically ciabatta or baguette, and filled with various ingredients such as meats, cheeses, and vegetables. Panini is the plural form of panino, which means “sandwich” in Italian.

  • For example, “I had a delicious panini for lunch at the café.”
  • A food enthusiast might say, “I love trying different panini combinations and exploring new flavors.”
  • A person might recommend a panini place to a friend, saying, “You have to try the panini at this café, they’re amazing!”

56. Baci

This is the plural form of the Italian word “bacio,” which means “kiss.” It is often used to express affection or as a friendly farewell.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Send my love and baci to your family.”
  • In a romantic context, someone might write, “Sending you virtual baci until I can see you again.”
  • A person might end a phone call with a friend by saying, “Talk to you later! Baci!”

57. Mamma

This is the Italian word for “mom” or “mother.” It is often used to refer to one’s own mother or to address someone else’s mother in an affectionate or respectful way.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going to visit my mamma this weekend.”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might ask, “How is your mamma doing?”
  • A person might say, “My mamma makes the best homemade pasta.”

58. Papà

This is the Italian word for “dad” or “father.” It is often used to refer to one’s own father or to address someone else’s father in an affectionate or respectful way.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m going fishing with my papà this weekend.”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might ask, “What does your papà do for a living?”
  • A person might say, “My papà taught me how to ride a bike.”

59. Bambina

This is the Italian word for “little girl.” It is often used to refer to a young female child or as a term of endearment for a girl or woman.

  • For example, a person might say, “Look at that adorable bambina playing in the park.”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might ask, “Do you have any bambine?”
  • A person might say, “I used to be a shy bambina, but now I’m more confident.”

60. Bella figura

This Italian phrase literally translates to “beautiful figure” and refers to the concept of making a good impression or presenting oneself well in social situations.

  • For instance, a person might say, “She always manages to make a bella figura at parties.”
  • In a discussion about etiquette, someone might say, “It’s important to make a bella figura when meeting new people.”
  • A person might advise, “If you want to be successful in business, you need to know how to make a bella figura.”

61. Festa

This word refers to a celebration or party in Italian. It can be used to describe any kind of social gathering or event where people come together to have fun and enjoy themselves.

  • For example, “Let’s go to Maria’s house for a festa tonight!”
  • During the summer, many towns in Italy have outdoor festas with live music and food stalls.
  • Italians love to celebrate their national holidays with big festas in the streets, complete with parades and fireworks.
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62. Gelateria

In Italian, a gelateria is a shop that specializes in selling gelato, the traditional Italian ice cream. Gelaterias are popular throughout Italy and offer a wide variety of flavors and toppings for customers to choose from.

  • For instance, “Let’s stop by the gelateria and get some gelato after dinner.”
  • Gelaterias often have long lines during the summer months when tourists and locals alike crave a refreshing scoop of gelato.
  • In Italy, gelato is considered a traditional dessert and is often enjoyed by families after a Sunday lunch.