Top 55 Slang For Joining – Meaning & Usage

Joining a new group or community can be both exciting and nerve-wracking, especially when you’re not familiar with the lingo. But fear not, we’ve got you covered with a list of the coolest and most popular slang terms for joining different groups. From online forums to social clubs, this list will have you feeling like a pro in no time. So, get ready to brush up on your vocabulary and dive into the world of joining with confidence!

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This phrase is used to indicate the act of meeting up or connecting with someone. It can refer to physically meeting in person or connecting online.

  • For example, “Let’s link up for coffee tomorrow.”
  • A person might say, “I linked up with my old friend from college.”
  • In a conversation about networking, someone might suggest, “We should link up and discuss potential collaborations.”

2. Tag along

This phrase is used to describe the act of joining someone or a group without being explicitly invited. It implies going along with someone else’s plans or activities.

  • For instance, “I didn’t have any plans, so I decided to tag along with my friends.”
  • A person might say, “Mind if I tag along to the concert with you?”
  • In a discussion about a group outing, someone might ask, “Can I tag along with you guys?”

3. Hop on board

This phrase is used to express the act of joining in or becoming part of something. It implies getting involved or participating in an activity or group.

  • For example, “We’re starting a new project, hop on board if you’re interested.”
  • A person might say, “I decided to hop on board with the charity event.”
  • In a conversation about a new business venture, someone might suggest, “If you’re looking for opportunities, you should hop on board with our team.”

4. Team up

This phrase is used to describe the act of collaborating or joining forces with someone. It implies working together towards a common goal or objective.

  • For instance, “Let’s team up and tackle this project together.”
  • A person might say, “We should team up for the doubles tournament.”
  • In a discussion about a group project, someone might suggest, “We should team up with the marketing department to maximize our reach.”

5. Jump in

This phrase is used to indicate the act of joining a conversation or activity without hesitation. It implies getting involved right away without any hesitation or reservation.

  • For example, “I had a great idea, so I decided to jump in and share it.”
  • A person might say, “I’m just going to jump in and help them with the setup.”
  • In a conversation about a group discussion, someone might suggest, “Feel free to jump in at any time and share your thoughts.”

6. Get in on

This phrase is used to express the desire to be included or involved in a particular activity or opportunity. It implies joining in on something that is already happening or being offered.

  • For example, “I heard there’s a new dance class starting next week. I definitely want to get in on that.”
  • A friend might say, “We’re going to the casino tonight. Do you want to get in on the action?”
  • In a conversation about a business venture, someone might ask, “Are you interested in getting in on this investment opportunity?”

7. Sign up

This term is commonly used to describe the act of officially joining or registering for something, such as a membership, event, or service.

  • For instance, “I’m going to sign up for the yoga class at the gym.”
  • A person might say, “I signed up for the newsletter to receive updates on upcoming sales.”
  • In a conversation about volunteering, someone might mention, “I signed up to help out at the local animal shelter.”

8. Throw in with

This phrase is used to describe the act of joining or aligning oneself with a group or cause. It implies a sense of collaboration or partnership.

  • For example, “After hearing their ideas, I decided to throw in with the new project team.”
  • A person might say, “I threw in with the environmental organization to support their efforts.”
  • In a discussion about political alliances, someone might mention, “The party decided to throw in with a smaller coalition to gain more influence.”

9. Hitch a ride

This slang phrase is used to describe the act of getting a ride from someone, typically by asking or joining someone who is already traveling in the desired direction.

  • For instance, “I missed the bus, so I had to hitch a ride with a friend to get to work.”
  • A person might say, “I’m heading downtown. If you need a lift, you can hitch a ride with me.”
  • In a conversation about road trips, someone might ask, “Can I hitch a ride with you guys to the beach?”

10. Buddy up

This phrase is used to describe the act of forming a partnership or close friendship with someone. It implies a sense of camaraderie and mutual support.

  • For example, “In gym class, we always buddy up for partner exercises.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s buddy up and tackle this project together.”
  • In a discussion about safety, someone might advise, “It’s always a good idea to buddy up when walking alone at night.”

11. Climb aboard

This phrase is used to invite someone to participate or join in an activity or group. It can also be used figuratively to mean accepting or embracing a new idea or concept.

  • For example, a team leader might say, “We have a new project starting, so climb aboard and let’s get to work!”
  • In a social setting, someone might say, “We’re going to karaoke, wanna climb aboard?”
  • Figuratively, a person might say, “I finally climbed aboard the vegan train and haven’t looked back since.”

12. Get with the program

This phrase is used to encourage someone to understand and conform to a particular plan, idea, or way of doing things. It implies that the person needs to catch up or align themselves with the current situation.

  • For instance, a teacher might say to a student, “You need to get with the program and start studying for the upcoming exam.”
  • In a work context, a supervisor might say to an employee, “We’re implementing a new software system, so it’s important to get with the program.”
  • In a group setting, someone might say, “We’re all going to the concert, get with the program and buy your ticket.”

13. Get on the same page

This phrase is used to express the need for everyone to have a shared understanding or agreement on a particular topic or plan. It implies the importance of being in sync or on the same wavelength.

  • For example, during a team meeting, a manager might say, “Let’s clarify our goals and get on the same page before we proceed.”
  • In a relationship, one partner might say, “We need to get on the same page about our future plans.”
  • When working on a group project, a team member might suggest, “Let’s have a meeting to ensure we’re all on the same page.”

14. Be a part of

This phrase is used to express the idea of becoming involved or included in a group, activity, or organization. It emphasizes the desire to contribute and participate.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “We’re going to a concert tonight, do you want to be a part of it?”
  • In a work context, a colleague might say, “We’re forming a committee to address this issue, would you like to be a part of it?”
  • When discussing a social event, someone might ask, “Are you going to be a part of the charity fundraiser?”

15. Sign on

This phrase is often used in a professional or contractual context to indicate the act of officially agreeing to be a part of an organization, project, or initiative. It can also be used more broadly to mean joining or becoming involved in any type of endeavor.

  • For example, a job applicant might say, “I’m excited to sign on with this company and contribute to their success.”
  • In a military context, a recruit might say, “I’ve decided to sign on and serve my country.”
  • When discussing a sports team, a player might announce, “I’ve signed on to play for this team next season.”

16. Throw in

This phrase is often used when someone wants to contribute or participate in something, usually by adding their resources or effort.

  • For example, in a group project, someone might say, “I can throw in some ideas for the presentation.”
  • When organizing a potluck, a host might ask guests to “throw in a dish or two.”
  • In a conversation about a fundraising event, someone might suggest, “Let’s all throw in some money to support the cause.”

17. Hop on

This phrase is used to express joining or participating in something, often with enthusiasm or eagerness.

  • For instance, if someone invites you to a party, you might respond, “Sure, I’ll hop on that!”
  • When a friend suggests going on a road trip, you could say, “I’m in! Let’s hop on and hit the road.”
  • In a discussion about a new project at work, a colleague might say, “I’m excited to hop on and contribute to the team.”

18. Join forces

This phrase refers to the act of coming together and collaborating with others to achieve a common goal or purpose.

  • For example, in a business context, two companies might join forces to launch a new product or service.
  • During a crisis, different organizations might join forces to provide aid and support to those affected.
  • In a team sports context, players from different teams might join forces to compete in a tournament or championship.
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19. Band together

This phrase means to come together and unite as a group, often to support each other or achieve a common objective.

  • For instance, in a community facing a natural disaster, residents might band together to provide assistance and resources.
  • In a political context, different organizations or individuals might band together to advocate for a specific cause or issue.
  • When a group of friends decides to start a project, they might band together to pool their skills and resources.

20. Get together

This phrase is used to express the act of meeting or gathering with others, usually for social or recreational purposes.

  • For example, friends might plan to get together for a movie night or a dinner party.
  • When organizing a reunion, classmates might decide to get together to reminisce and catch up.
  • In a work context, colleagues might arrange to get together for a brainstorming session or team-building activity.

21. Join in

To become involved in an ongoing activity or conversation. It implies actively participating or contributing.

  • For example, at a party, someone might say, “Feel free to join in the game of charades.”
  • In a group discussion, a person might ask, “Can I join in on this topic?”
  • During a dance class, the instructor might say, “Now it’s time for everyone to join in and follow along.”

22. Mingle in

To interact with people in a social setting, usually by moving around and talking to different individuals.

  • For instance, at a networking event, someone might say, “Don’t be shy, mingle in and make connections.”
  • At a party, a guest might comment, “I love how everyone mingles in and gets to know each other.”
  • During a conference, a participant might ask, “Do you want to mingle in and meet some new people?”

23. Tag in

To join an ongoing conversation or activity, typically by replacing or relieving someone else.

  • For example, in a game of tag, one person might say, “Tag me in!” to indicate they want to join the game.
  • In a group project, a team member might ask, “Can I tag in and take over for a while?”
  • During a wrestling match, a wrestler might tag in their partner by reaching out and making physical contact.

24. Partner up

To join forces with someone to work together as partners or teammates.

  • For instance, during a dance class, the instructor might say, “Partner up for the next routine.”
  • In a business setting, a manager might suggest, “Let’s partner up with another department to tackle this project.”
  • During a group activity, someone might ask, “Does anyone want to partner up with me?”

25. Take the plunge

To make a bold decision to start or join something, often with a sense of excitement or apprehension.

  • For example, when joining a new club, a person might say, “I’ve decided to take the plunge and become a member.”
  • In a conversation about starting a business, someone might say, “I’m finally ready to take the plunge and quit my job.”
  • Before skydiving, a person might express, “I’m nervous, but I’m ready to take the plunge and jump out of a plane.”

26. Unite with

To join or combine forces with someone or a group in order to achieve a common goal or purpose.

  • For example, “The two organizations decided to unite in order to increase their impact.”
  • A political party might urge voters to “Unite with us to bring about real change.”
  • In a business context, a company might say, “We are looking to unite with other industry leaders to drive innovation.”

27. Collaborate with

To work jointly with someone or a group on a project or task, usually to create something or solve a problem.

  • For instance, “The two artists collaborated on a new song.”
  • In a professional setting, a team might collaborate with another team to develop a new product.
  • A school project might require students to collaborate with their classmates to complete the assignment.
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28. Merge with

To combine or integrate two or more entities or organizations into one larger entity.

  • For example, “The two companies decided to merge in order to expand their market share.”
  • In the tech industry, a company might merge with another to pool their resources and expertise.
  • A nonprofit organization might merge with a similar organization to better serve their shared mission.

29. Tie up with

To form a partnership or alliance with someone or a group, usually for a specific purpose or project.

  • For instance, “The company tied up with a local charity to support a community initiative.”
  • In the sports world, a team might tie up with a sponsor to receive financial support.
  • A fashion brand might tie up with a celebrity to create a limited edition collection.

30. Pair up

To form a pair or team with someone, usually for a specific activity or task.

  • For example, “The students paired up for a science experiment.”
  • In a dance competition, partners might pair up to perform together.
  • A company might pair up with a nonprofit organization to launch a fundraising campaign.

31. Engage with

To actively interact or involve oneself with a person, group, or activity. “Engage with” implies a level of interest and participation in the interaction or activity.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I encourage students to engage with the material by asking questions.”
  • In a social setting, one might say, “I love engaging with new people and hearing their stories.”
  • A company might encourage its employees to “engage with” customers through social media interactions.

32. Participate in

To take part in or be involved in an activity, event, or organization. “Participate in” implies active involvement and contribution to the activity.

  • For instance, a sports coach might say, “All team members must participate in the practice sessions.”
  • In a discussion about community service, one might say, “It’s important to participate in volunteer activities to give back to the community.”
  • A person might decide to “participate in” a protest or rally to express their views.

33. Associate with

To be connected or affiliated with a person, group, organization, or idea. “Associate with” implies a connection or relationship, often based on shared interests or values.

  • For example, a person might say, “I choose to associate with like-minded individuals who share my passion for social justice.”
  • In a professional context, one might say, “It’s important to associate with reputable organizations to build a strong network.”
  • A person might decide to “associate with” a particular political party or ideology.

34. Connect up

To join or link together objects, systems, or people. “Connect up” implies the act of bringing separate entities together to form a unified whole.

  • For instance, a technician might say, “I need to connect up the cables to establish a network.”
  • In a discussion about social relationships, one might say, “I enjoy connecting up with people who share my hobbies and interests.”
  • A person might decide to “connect up” with a mentor or coach to gain guidance and support.

35. Combine with

To merge or unite with something or someone to form a collective entity or to work together towards a common goal. “Combine with” implies the act of bringing different elements together to create a stronger or more effective whole.

  • For example, a chef might say, “I love combining different flavors and ingredients to create unique dishes.”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, one might say, “When we combine our skills and strengths, we can achieve great things.”
  • A person might decide to “combine with” a colleague or friend to collaborate on a project or venture.

36. Contribute to

This phrase is often used to describe joining a group or effort and actively participating or providing assistance. It implies a willingness to contribute one’s skills, resources, or efforts for a common goal.

  • For example, a team leader might say, “We need everyone to contribute to this project to ensure its success.”
  • In a volunteer organization, a member might ask, “How can I contribute to the upcoming event?”
  • A colleague might suggest, “Let’s all contribute to the brainstorming session and come up with innovative ideas.”

37. Enroll in

To enroll in something means to officially join or register for a particular activity, course, or program. It often implies a commitment to participate and follow through with the requirements or obligations of the enrollment.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I’m planning to enroll in a photography class next semester.”
  • A fitness enthusiast might announce, “I’ve decided to enroll in a marathon and start training.”
  • A person interested in learning a new language might ask, “Where can I enroll in a Spanish course?”

38. Enter into

This phrase is used to describe joining or becoming involved in a particular situation, agreement, or relationship. It suggests actively entering or immersing oneself in the given context.

  • For example, a businessperson might say, “We’re looking to enter into a partnership with a local company.”
  • In a conversation about a new job, someone might mention, “I’ve decided to enter into a contract with a reputable organization.”
  • A person starting a relationship might say, “I’m ready to enter into a committed partnership.”

39. Join up

To join up means to become a member of a group or team, often with the intention of working together towards a common goal. It implies a sense of collaboration and cooperation.

  • For instance, a group of friends planning a road trip might say, “Who wants to join up and make this trip unforgettable?”
  • In a sports context, a coach might encourage players by saying, “Let’s join up and give our best on the field.”
  • A colleague might suggest, “Why don’t we join up and tackle this project together?”

To link in means to connect or associate oneself with a particular group or network, often for professional or social purposes. It implies establishing relationships and building connections within the given community.

  • For example, a job seeker might say, “I’m looking to link in with professionals in my industry to expand my network.”
  • In a conversation about social media, someone might mention, “Make sure to link in with influencers to increase your online presence.”
  • A person attending a conference might ask, “Can you help me link in with key speakers and industry leaders?”

41. Meet up with

This phrase refers to the act of coming together with others at a specific location or event. It can be used to describe informal social gatherings or more formal meetings.

  • For example, “Let’s meet up with our friends for dinner tonight.”
  • A person organizing a study group might say, “We should meet up with the rest of the group at the library.”
  • In a business context, someone might suggest, “We should meet up with the client to discuss the project.”

42. Pair off

This phrase is commonly used to describe the act of forming couples or teams, often in a social or romantic context. It implies that individuals are joining together in pairs.

  • For instance, “At the dance, everyone paired off and started dancing.”
  • A person organizing a game might say, “Let’s pair off into teams of two.”
  • In a discussion about dating, someone might mention, “It’s always awkward when people start pairing off at parties.”

43. Register for

This phrase is used to indicate the act of signing up or enrolling for a particular event, course, or program. It implies a formal process of providing personal information and officially joining.

  • For example, “I need to register for the conference before the deadline.”
  • A student might say, “I have to register for my classes next semester.”
  • In a discussion about a charity run, someone might mention, “I’m planning to register for the 5K race.”

44. Sign up for

This phrase is similar to “register for” and is used to express the act of enrolling or joining a specific event, organization, or program. It often implies filling out a form or providing contact information.

  • For instance, “I’m going to sign up for the cooking class at the community center.”
  • A person interested in volunteering might say, “I want to sign up for the local charity’s newsletter.”
  • In a conversation about a fitness challenge, someone might mention, “I’m thinking about signing up for the marathon.”

45. Unify with

This phrase refers to the act of joining or coming together with others to form a unified whole. It implies the merging or combining of separate entities into one.

  • For example, “The two companies decided to unify with a common goal.”
  • A person discussing political movements might say, “We need to unify with other like-minded individuals to bring about change.”
  • In a discussion about team sports, someone might mention, “The players need to unify with a shared strategy in order to win the game.”

46. Ally with

To join forces or cooperate with someone or a group, usually for a common purpose or goal.

  • For example, “The two countries decided to ally with each other to combat climate change.”
  • In a video game, a player might say, “I need someone to ally with me to defeat the boss.”
  • A political candidate might announce, “I am seeking to ally with other parties to create a stronger coalition.”

47. Attach to

To join or connect something to another thing, often physically or metaphorically.

  • For instance, “You need to attach the document to your email.”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, someone might say, “I always try to attach myself to projects that have a positive impact.”
  • A person promoting a cause might urge, “Please attach your name to this petition for change.”

48. Belong to

To be a part of a group or organization.

  • For example, “I belong to a book club that meets once a month.”
  • In a conversation about identity, someone might say, “I belong to the LGBTQ+ community.”
  • A person discussing their career might mention, “I belong to a professional association for graphic designers.”

49. Combine forces

To join or unite with others to form a stronger or more effective group.

  • For instance, “The two companies decided to combine forces to compete in the market.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “We need to combine forces and work as a team to win this game.”
  • A person advocating for collaboration might argue, “When we combine forces, we can achieve greater results than working alone.”

50. Jump on board

To join or participate in something, often when it is already in progress.

  • For example, “I decided to jump on board with the charity event and help out.”
  • In a discussion about a new project, someone might say, “We need more people to jump on board and contribute their ideas.”
  • A person promoting a social movement might urge, “Don’t miss the opportunity to jump on board and make a difference.”

51. Get in the game

This phrase means to actively join or become involved in a particular activity or situation. It is often used to encourage someone to join in and not miss out on an opportunity.

  • For example, if a group of friends is playing a game, one might say, “Come on, get in the game and show us your skills!”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “We need everyone to get in the game and contribute their ideas.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Don’t just sit on the sidelines, get in the game and participate!”

52. Take up

This phrase means to begin or start doing something, often in the context of joining a new activity or hobby.

  • For instance, if someone decides to start playing the guitar, they might say, “I’m going to take up the guitar.”
  • A person interested in fitness might say, “I’m thinking about taking up running to improve my health.”
  • If someone wants to join a dance class, they might say, “I’ve always wanted to learn ballet, so I’m going to take it up.”

53. Join in the fun

This phrase means to become a part of or participate in an enjoyable or entertaining activity or event.

  • For example, at a party, someone might say, “Come on, join in the fun and dance with us!”
  • If a group of friends is playing a game, one might say, “Don’t just watch, join in the fun and play with us.”
  • In a community event, a flyer might say, “Everyone is welcome to join in the fun and celebrate together!”

54. Get on the train

This phrase is often used metaphorically to mean joining a popular trend, movement, or idea. It implies that one should get on board with the current momentum.

  • For instance, if a new social media platform becomes popular, someone might say, “I need to get on the train and create an account.”
  • In a discussion about environmental conservation, one might say, “It’s time for everyone to get on the train and start making sustainable choices.”
  • A person interested in a new fitness trend might say, “I’m going to get on the train and try out that new workout program.”

55. Get in the loop

This phrase means to become informed or involved in a particular group or network where important information or updates are shared.

  • For example, if there’s a group chat where plans are being made, someone might say, “Make sure you get in the loop so you don’t miss any updates.”
  • In a workplace, a colleague might tell another, “I’ll add you to the email distribution list so you can get in the loop.”
  • If a friend is organizing a surprise party, they might say, “Don’t worry, I’ll get you in the loop and keep you updated on all the details.”