Top 55 Slang For Justice – Meaning & Usage

Slang For Justice is a powerful collection of terms that not only reflect the current social climate but also empower individuals to speak out against injustices. From protest chants to online activism, these words carry weight and meaning in the fight for equality and fairness. Join us as we unravel the significance behind these impactful phrases and arm yourself with the language of change. Let’s dive into this list and embrace the power of words in the pursuit of justice.

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1. Vindication

Vindication refers to the act of proving someone’s innocence or righteousness in a situation or dispute. It often involves providing evidence or arguments that support a person’s claim or position.

  • For example, in a legal case, a lawyer might say, “We will present evidence that will lead to the vindication of our client.”
  • In a personal conflict, someone might say, “I will do whatever it takes to achieve vindication and clear my name.”
  • A person discussing a past injustice might say, “The truth eventually came out, leading to the vindication of the wrongly accused.”

2. Comeuppance

Comeuppance refers to the act of receiving the punishment or consequences that one deserves, especially in a negative sense. It often implies that someone’s actions or behavior have led to their downfall or retribution.

  • For instance, in a movie, a villain might finally receive their comeuppance at the hands of the hero.
  • In a discussion about karma, someone might say, “Everyone eventually gets their comeuppance.”
  • A person reflecting on their past mistakes might say, “I’ve learned my lesson and now I’m facing the comeuppance for my actions.”

3. Law and order

Law and order refers to the concept of maintaining societal rules and regulations. It emphasizes the importance of following the law and upholding order within a community or society.

  • For example, a politician might campaign on a platform of promoting law and order in their city.
  • In a discussion about crime prevention, someone might argue, “We need strong law and order to keep our communities safe.”
  • A person advocating for stricter punishments might say, “We need to restore law and order to deter criminals.”

4. Retribution

Retribution refers to the act of seeking punishment or revenge for a wrongdoing. It often involves taking action to make someone pay for their actions or to restore justice.

  • For instance, in a movie, a character might seek retribution against the person who wronged them.
  • In a discussion about criminal justice, someone might argue, “Retribution is necessary to ensure that criminals face the consequences of their actions.”
  • A person reflecting on a past injustice might say, “I hope to see retribution for the harm that was done to me.”

5. Accountability

Accountability refers to the act of taking responsibility for one’s actions. It involves acknowledging the consequences of one’s choices and being willing to accept the blame or praise that comes with them.

  • For example, a leader might emphasize the importance of accountability within their organization.
  • In a discussion about ethics, someone might argue, “Accountability is crucial for maintaining trust and integrity.”
  • A person reflecting on their own behavior might say, “I take full accountability for my actions and the impact they had on others.”

6. Rectitude

Rectitude refers to moral integrity or righteousness. It is the quality of being honest, upright, and morally correct.

  • For example, a person might say, “She always acts with rectitude and never compromises her principles.”
  • In a discussion about ethical behavior, someone might argue, “We should strive for rectitude in our actions and decisions.”
  • A character in a novel might be described as having “a strong sense of rectitude,“a strong sense of rectitude, always doing what is right.”

7. Equity

Equity refers to fairness and justice in the distribution of resources, opportunities, and benefits. It is the principle of treating everyone equally and ensuring that each person receives what they deserve.

  • For instance, a person might say, “We need to strive for equity in education, so that every child has an equal chance to succeed.”
  • In a discussion about social justice, someone might argue, “Equity is essential to creating a just society.”
  • A policy that aims to address historical inequalities might be described as promoting “equity and inclusion.”

8. Reckoning

Reckoning refers to the settlement of accounts or the resolution of a situation. It is often used in the context of seeking justice or holding someone accountable for their actions.

  • For example, a person might say, “The reckoning for their crimes will come soon.”
  • In a discussion about social change, someone might argue, “We are in the midst of a reckoning, as marginalized communities demand justice.”
  • A character in a movie might declare, “It’s time for a reckoning, and those who have done wrong will pay.”

9. Redress

Redress refers to a remedy or compensation for a wrong or injustice. It is the act of correcting or making amends for a past wrongdoing.

  • For instance, a person might say, “We must seek redress for the victims of this injustice.”
  • In a discussion about human rights, someone might argue, “Redress is crucial to healing the wounds of the past and moving towards a more just future.”
  • A policy that aims to address systemic inequalities might be described as providing “redress for historical injustices.”

10. Rectify

Rectify means to correct or fix something that is wrong or unjust. It is the act of making things right or restoring justice.

  • For example, a person might say, “We need to rectify the mistakes of the past to create a more equitable society.”
  • In a discussion about accountability, someone might argue, “We must rectify the injustices that have been perpetuated.”
  • A character in a play might declare, “I will rectify this injustice and ensure that the truth is known.”

11. Judgement day

Refers to a future event where individuals are judged or held accountable for their actions or behavior.

  • For example, a person might say, “On judgement day, all secrets will be revealed.”
  • In a religious context, someone might discuss, “The concept of judgement day is central to many belief systems.”
  • A person reflecting on their past might say, “I hope to make amends before judgement day arrives.”

12. Lawful

Describes something that is legal or follows the rules and regulations set by a governing authority.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I always strive to live a lawful life.”
  • In a discussion about the justice system, someone might argue, “Lawful actions are essential for a fair society.”
  • A person might comment on a news article, “The court’s decision was lawful and just.”

13. Integrity

Refers to the quality of being honest, having strong moral principles, and adhering to a code of ethics.

  • For example, a person might say, “Integrity is crucial for a just society.”
  • In a discussion about a public figure, someone might question, “Does this politician have the integrity to lead?”
  • A person might comment on a news story, “The journalist’s integrity is evident in their unbiased reporting.”

14. Upright

Describes a person who is morally upright, honorable, and adheres to principles of justice and fairness.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He is known for his upright character.”
  • In a discussion about a court case, someone might argue, “The judge’s upright decision upheld justice.”
  • A person might comment on a social issue, “We need more leaders who are upright and just.”

15. Morality

Refers to the principles and beliefs that guide a person’s sense of right and wrong, and their understanding of what is morally acceptable.

  • For example, a person might say, “Morality should be the foundation of our justice system.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might argue, “Different cultures have different moralities.”
  • A person might comment on an ethical dilemma, “The decision raises questions about the morality of the situation.”

16. Conscience

This refers to a person’s internal sense of right and wrong. It is the moral compass that guides one’s actions and decisions.

  • For example, a person might say, “My conscience wouldn’t allow me to cheat on the test.”
  • When faced with a difficult choice, someone might say, “I have to listen to my conscience and do what I believe is right.”
  • A character in a movie might struggle with their conscience, saying, “I know it’s wrong, but my conscience won’t let me walk away.”

17. Honesty

This refers to the quality of being truthful, sincere, and free from deceit or fraud. It is an important value in the pursuit of justice.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Honesty is the foundation of a just society.”
  • When asked if they stole something, a person might respond, “I swear on my honesty that I didn’t take it.”
  • A parent might teach their child the importance of honesty, saying, “Always tell the truth, even when it’s difficult.”

18. Just deserts

This phrase refers to receiving what one deserves, especially in terms of punishment or reward. It implies that justice has been served.

  • For example, if a criminal is sentenced to prison for their crimes, one might say, “They got their just deserts.”
  • When someone receives a fitting consequence for their actions, a person might comment, “They finally got what they deserved, their just deserts.”
  • In a discussion about justice, someone might argue, “Everyone should receive their just deserts, whether good or bad.”

19. Righting wrongs

This phrase refers to taking action to correct or address unfair or unjust situations. It implies the pursuit of justice and making things right.

  • For instance, a person might dedicate their life to righting wrongs, saying, “I want to make the world a better place.”
  • When faced with an injustice, someone might say, “It’s time to stand up and start righting these wrongs.”
  • In a movie about social justice, a character might say, “We won’t stop until every wrong is righted.”

This phrase refers to the concept of justice as it is enforced and upheld by the legal system. It emphasizes the importance of equal treatment and due process.

  • For example, a person might say, “Legal justice should be accessible to all, regardless of their background.”
  • When discussing a court case, someone might comment, “The verdict was a triumph for legal justice.”
  • In a debate about the justice system, a person might argue, “We need reforms to ensure that legal justice is truly fair for everyone.”

21. Due process

The term “due process” refers to the legal requirement that the government must respect all legal rights that are owed to a person. It ensures that individuals are treated fairly and have the opportunity to defend themselves in a court of law.

  • For example, a person accused of a crime has the right to due process, which includes being informed of the charges, the right to an attorney, and a fair trial.
  • In a discussion about criminal justice reform, someone might argue, “We need to ensure that due process is upheld for all individuals, regardless of their background.”
  • A lawyer might explain, “Due process is a fundamental principle of our legal system, ensuring that everyone is treated fairly under the law.”

22. Payback

“Payback” is a slang term used to describe seeking retribution or revenge for a perceived wrongdoing. It implies getting even or settling a score with someone who has wronged you.

  • For instance, if someone steals your lunch, you might seek payback by pranking them in return.
  • In a conversation about personal relationships, a person might say, “I’m not one to seek payback, but I believe in standing up for myself.”
  • A character in a movie might declare, “It’s time for payback” before taking revenge on their enemies.
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23. Settle the score

To “settle the score” means to seek justice or revenge for a past wrongdoing. It implies taking action to resolve a conflict or seek retribution.

  • For example, if someone cheats you out of money, you might want to settle the score by taking them to court.
  • In a discussion about resolving conflicts, someone might say, “Sometimes, it’s necessary to settle the score to restore balance and ensure justice.”
  • A character in a book might declare, “It’s time to settle the score once and for all” before confronting their nemesis.

24. Retaliation

Retaliation refers to the act of responding to an attack or offense with a counterattack or similar action. It involves seeking revenge or retribution against someone who has wronged you.

  • For instance, if someone spreads rumors about you, you might retaliate by spreading rumors about them in return.
  • In a conversation about workplace disputes, a person might say, “Retaliation is never the answer. It only perpetuates the cycle of conflict.”
  • A character in a TV show might plot their retaliation, saying, “I won’t let them get away with it. I’ll plan the perfect retaliation.”

25. Reprisal

Reprisal refers to an act of retaliation or punishment in response to a perceived wrongdoing or offense. It involves taking action to seek retribution or to deter future misconduct.

  • For example, if a country is attacked, they might launch a military reprisal against the aggressor.
  • In a discussion about international relations, someone might argue, “Reprisals can escalate conflicts and lead to a never-ending cycle of violence.”
  • A character in a novel might seek reprisal against their enemies, vowing, “I will make them pay for what they’ve done.”

26. Recompense

Recompense refers to the act of compensating or making amends for a loss or injury. It is often used in the context of justice to refer to the payment or reward given to someone as a result of a legal claim or settlement.

  • For example, “The company agreed to provide financial recompense to the victims of the accident.”
  • In a discussion about fair treatment, someone might argue, “Recompense should be provided to those who have been wronged.”
  • A lawyer might advise their client, “We will seek recompense for the damages you have suffered.”

27. Retributive justice

Retributive justice is a theory of justice that focuses on punishment as a means of balancing the scales and restoring order. It is often associated with the concept of “an eye for an eye,” where the punishment is proportionate to the harm caused.

  • For instance, “Some argue that retributive justice is necessary to deter future crimes.”
  • In a debate about criminal sentencing, someone might say, “We need to ensure that retributive justice is served.”
  • A philosopher might discuss the moral implications of retributive justice, stating, “Retribution should be tempered with mercy and rehabilitation.”

28. Justification

Justification refers to the act of providing reasons or evidence to support or explain a belief, action, or decision. In the context of justice, it often involves explaining or defending the fairness or legitimacy of a particular course of action.

  • For example, “The lawyer presented a strong justification for their client’s actions.”
  • In a discussion about legal principles, someone might argue, “The burden of proof is the justification for requiring evidence.”
  • A critic might question the justification for a controversial policy, stating, “I fail to see the justification for such a discriminatory law.”

29. Punitive

Punitive refers to actions or measures that are intended to punish or penalize someone for their actions. In the context of justice, it often refers to the imposition of a penalty or punishment as a means of deterrence or retribution.

  • For instance, “The judge handed down a punitive sentence to send a message.”
  • In a debate about criminal justice reform, someone might argue, “We need to move away from punitive measures and focus on rehabilitation.”
  • A victim might seek punitive damages in a civil lawsuit, stating, “I want the responsible party to be punished for what they did.”

30. Fair shake

Fair shake is a colloquial term that refers to the concept of giving someone a fair and equal opportunity or chance. It is often used in the context of justice to advocate for equal treatment and fairness.

  • For example, “Everyone deserves a fair shake in the criminal justice system.”
  • In a discussion about social equality, someone might say, “We need to ensure that everyone has a fair shake in life.”
  • A politician might promise to give their constituents a fair shake, stating, “I will fight for your rights and ensure equal opportunities for all.”

31. Square deal

This phrase refers to a fair and honest agreement or transaction. It implies that both parties involved are being treated equally and justly.

  • For example, “I want to make sure we have a square deal before we sign the contract.”
  • In a discussion about business ethics, someone might say, “A square deal is essential for building trust with customers.”
  • A person advocating for fair labor practices might argue, “Workers deserve a square deal, including fair wages and safe working conditions.”

Legal retribution refers to the act of seeking punishment or retaliation through the legal system. It involves taking legal action to hold someone accountable for their actions.

  • For instance, “The victim’s family is seeking legal retribution against the person responsible for their loved one’s death.”
  • In a discussion about criminal justice, someone might say, “The purpose of legal retribution is to ensure that those who break the law face consequences.”
  • A person advocating for justice might argue, “Legal retribution is necessary to maintain the rule of law and deter future wrongdoing.”

33. Repayment

Repayment refers to the act of compensating or making amends for a debt or wrongdoing. It involves giving back or returning something that was taken or owed.

  • For example, “He promised to make repayment for the money he borrowed.”
  • In a discussion about financial responsibility, someone might say, “Repayment of debts is crucial for maintaining good credit.”
  • A person advocating for fairness might argue, “Repayment should be required for those who have caused harm or damage to others.”

34. Fairness

Fairness refers to the quality of treating everyone equitably and justly. It implies that all individuals are given equal opportunities and are judged by the same standards.

  • For instance, “The decision was made with fairness in mind, considering the rights and needs of all parties involved.”
  • In a discussion about social justice, someone might say, “Fairness is about ensuring that everyone has equal access to resources and opportunities.”
  • A person advocating for fairness might argue, “A fair society is one where everyone is treated with dignity and respect, regardless of their background or circumstances.”

35. Rectification

Rectification refers to the act of correcting or making right a wrong or injustice. It involves taking action to resolve a problem or restore fairness.

  • For example, “The company acknowledged their mistake and took steps towards rectification.”
  • In a discussion about human rights, someone might say, “Rectification is crucial for addressing past injustices and creating a more equal society.”
  • A person advocating for justice might argue, “Rectification requires acknowledging and addressing the harm caused, as well as implementing measures to prevent future injustices.”

36. Vengeance

Vengeance refers to the act of seeking revenge or inflicting harm on someone as a form of punishment or retribution. It is often driven by a strong desire for justice or to right a wrong.

  • For example, a character in a movie might say, “I will have my vengeance against those who wronged me.”
  • In a discussion about personal conflicts, someone might say, “I believe in karma, and vengeance will come to those who deserve it.”
  • A person seeking justice might declare, “I won’t rest until I have vengeance for what they did.”

37. Retaliate

Retaliate refers to the act of responding to an attack or harm with a similar or equal level of force. It is a way to defend oneself or seek justice by taking action against those who have wronged you.

  • For instance, if someone insults you, you might retaliate by insulting them back.
  • In a discussion about bullying, someone might say, “It’s important to teach kids how to respond appropriately when they are being bullied, rather than just encouraging them to retaliate.”
  • A person discussing self-defense might argue, “Retaliating against an attacker is a natural instinct and can be an effective way to protect yourself.”

38. Balance the scales

To balance the scales means to restore fairness or equality in a situation. It is often used to describe the act of seeking justice or making things right.

  • For example, a lawyer might say, “Our goal is to balance the scales of justice and ensure a fair trial.”
  • In a discussion about social issues, someone might argue, “We need to address systemic inequalities in order to balance the scales.”
  • A person advocating for justice might declare, “It’s time to balance the scales and give a voice to the marginalized.”

To right the wrong means to correct an injustice or make amends for a past mistake or wrongdoing. It is often used to describe the act of seeking justice or rectifying a situation.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I will do whatever it takes to right the wrongs that have been done.”
  • In a discussion about historical injustices, someone might argue, “It’s important to acknowledge and right the wrongs of the past in order to move forward.”
  • A person advocating for change might declare, “We must right the wrongs of our society and create a more just and equal world.”

40. Serve justice

To serve justice means to administer or deliver a fair and appropriate punishment or consequence for a wrongdoing. It is often used to describe the act of seeking justice or ensuring that justice is served.

  • For example, a judge might say, “It is my duty to serve justice and uphold the law.”
  • In a discussion about criminal cases, someone might argue, “It’s important to ensure that the guilty are held accountable and justice is served.”
  • A person advocating for victims’ rights might declare, “We need to reform our justice system to better serve justice for survivors of crimes.”

41. Get what’s coming to you

This phrase is often used to imply that someone will face the appropriate consequences for their actions.

  • For example, if someone cheats on a test, a classmate might say, “Don’t worry, they’ll get what’s coming to them.”
  • In a discussion about a criminal, someone might comment, “I hope they finally get what’s coming to them for all the harm they’ve caused.”
  • A person might reflect on their own actions and say, “I’ve made some mistakes, but I know I’ll get what’s coming to me eventually.”

42. Stand up for what’s right

This phrase encourages individuals to support and fight for justice, fairness, and moral principles.

  • For instance, if someone witnesses an act of bullying, they might say, “It’s important to stand up for what’s right and intervene.”
  • In a conversation about activism, someone might say, “We need more people who are willing to stand up for what’s right and fight against injustice.”
  • A person might reflect on their own values and say, “I always try to stand up for what’s right, even if it’s not the popular opinion.”

43. Play by the rules

This phrase emphasizes the importance of adhering to the rules and not taking shortcuts or engaging in unethical behavior.

  • For example, in a sports competition, a coach might say, “Our team will play by the rules and compete fairly.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial decision, someone might argue, “The authorities should have played by the rules and followed the proper procedures.”
  • A person might reflect on their own behavior and say, “I believe it’s essential to play by the rules and maintain integrity in everything I do.”

44. Equal treatment

This term refers to the fair and unbiased treatment of all individuals, regardless of their race, gender, or other characteristics.

  • For instance, in a discussion about workplace diversity, someone might say, “We need to ensure equal treatment for all employees, regardless of their background.”
  • In a conversation about civil rights, someone might argue, “Equal treatment under the law is a fundamental aspect of justice.”
  • A person might reflect on society and say, “We still have a long way to go in achieving equal treatment for all individuals.”

45. Do the right thing

This phrase encourages individuals to make decisions and take actions that align with their values and principles.

  • For example, if someone is tempted to cheat on a test, a friend might say, “Do the right thing and study instead.”
  • In a discussion about a moral dilemma, someone might say, “It’s not always easy, but we must strive to do the right thing, even when it’s difficult.”
  • A person might reflect on their own choices and say, “I always try to do the right thing, even if it means sacrificing personal gain.”

46. Level the playing field

To create fair and equal conditions for everyone involved in a particular situation or competition. This phrase is often used to describe efforts to eliminate unfair advantages or disadvantages.

  • For example, in a sports context, someone might say, “We need to level the playing field by implementing stricter rules on performance-enhancing drugs.”
  • In a discussion about social equality, a person might argue, “Access to quality education is essential to level the playing field for all children.”
  • A politician might promise, “I will work to level the playing field for small businesses by reducing regulations and providing tax incentives.”

47. Uphold the law

To support and enforce the laws and regulations of a particular jurisdiction. This phrase is often used to emphasize the importance of following and respecting the legal system.

  • For instance, a police officer might say, “It is our duty to uphold the law and protect the community.”
  • In a courtroom, a judge might remind the jury, “Your role is to uphold the law and determine the guilt or innocence of the defendant.”
  • A citizen discussing the role of government might state, “It is the responsibility of elected officials to uphold the law and ensure justice for all.”

48. Fight for justice

To actively work towards achieving fair and equitable outcomes in legal, social, or political matters. This phrase is often used to describe efforts to right wrongs and ensure that everyone is treated justly.

  • For example, a civil rights activist might say, “We must continue to fight for justice and equality for all marginalized communities.”
  • In a discussion about criminal justice reform, someone might argue, “We need to fight for justice by addressing systemic issues within the system.”
  • A lawyer might tell their client, “I will fight for justice on your behalf and work towards a fair resolution.”

49. Set things right

To take action to correct or remedy a situation that is unjust or unfair. This phrase is often used to describe efforts to restore fairness and ensure that wrongs are made right.

  • For instance, a whistleblower might say, “I came forward to set things right and expose the corruption.”
  • In a discussion about reparations, someone might argue, “We need to set things right by providing restitution for historical injustices.”
  • A person discussing personal accountability might say, “When we make mistakes, it’s important to take responsibility and do what we can to set things right.”

50. Lawful justice

The principle of upholding the law and ensuring that justice is administered in a fair and lawful manner. This phrase is often used to emphasize the importance of following legal procedures and protecting the rights of all individuals involved.

  • For example, a judge might state, “Our goal is to ensure lawful justice is served and that the rights of all parties are protected.”
  • In a discussion about criminal trials, someone might argue, “The pursuit of lawful justice requires a thorough and impartial examination of the evidence.”
  • A legal scholar might discuss the concept of lawful justice in relation to international human rights law, stating, “Respecting the principles of lawful justice is essential to upholding the dignity and rights of all individuals.”

51. Justice served cold

This phrase refers to the concept of seeking revenge or retribution for a wrongdoing. It suggests that justice can be delayed but will eventually be served.

  • For example, “After years of investigation, the criminal was finally caught and justice served cold.”
  • In a discussion about a long-standing legal case, someone might say, “It took a while, but justice was served cold in the end.”
  • When talking about a satisfying outcome, a person might comment, “Seeing the guilty party behind bars was justice served cold.”

This term is used to describe a lawyer who is highly skilled and knowledgeable in their field. It implies that the lawyer has a sharp legal mind and is adept at navigating the complexities of the law.

  • For instance, “She is known as a legal eagle and is often sought after for her expertise.”
  • When discussing a high-profile case, someone might say, “The defense hired a legal eagle to ensure a strong defense.”
  • In a conversation about successful lawyers, a person might mention, “He’s a legal eagle who has won countless cases.”

53. Justice warrior

This term refers to someone who actively fights for justice and fairness in society. It implies that the person is passionate about addressing social issues and advocating for equality.

  • For example, “She is a justice warrior who tirelessly fights for the rights of marginalized communities.”
  • When discussing activism, someone might say, “Justice warriors play a crucial role in pushing for positive change.”
  • In a conversation about social justice movements, a person might comment, “Justice warriors are at the forefront of these important battles.”

54. Justice is blind

This phrase symbolizes the idea that justice should be impartial and unbiased, without consideration of a person’s social status, wealth, or other external factors.

  • For instance, “The judge made a fair ruling, proving that justice is blind.”
  • When discussing the importance of a fair legal system, someone might say, “Justice is blind and should treat everyone equally.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial case, a person might comment, “The outcome will show whether justice is truly blind.”

55. Truth and justice

This phrase represents the concept of upholding truth and fairness in the pursuit of justice. It implies that justice should be based on objective facts and moral principles.

  • For example, “The lawyer fought for truth and justice throughout the trial.”
  • When discussing the role of the legal system, someone might say, “The courts exist to ensure truth and justice prevail.”
  • In a conversation about a corrupt system, a person might comment, “We must fight for truth and justice to prevail.”