Top 40 Slang For Justified – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to slang, staying up-to-date is essential to understanding and connecting with others. That’s why we’ve put together a list of the top slang words for “justified” that you need to know. Whether you’re trying to keep up with the latest trends or simply want to expand your vocabulary, we’ve got you covered. Get ready to dive into this listicle and discover the coolest and most relevant slang for “justified” that will have you feeling like a language pro in no time.

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1. Just

When something is “just,” it means it is fair and reasonable. It implies that there is a valid reason or justification for a particular action or decision.

  • For example, if someone questions why they were given a parking ticket, they might say, “It’s not just! I was only parked for a few minutes.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “It’s just that everyone pays their fair share of taxes.”
  • A person might explain their actions by saying, “I did what I thought was just in that situation.”

2. Legit

When something is “legit,” it means it is genuine or authentic. It implies that there is a valid reason or justification for its existence or validity.

  • For instance, if someone questions the authenticity of a designer handbag, they might say, “Is it legit or a knockoff?”
  • In a conversation about a new restaurant, someone might say, “The food there is legit. You have to try it.”
  • A person might describe their qualifications by saying, “I have a legit degree in computer science.”

3. Righteous

When something is “righteous,” it means it is morally or ethically justifiable. It implies that there is a strong sense of justice or fairness in a particular action or decision.

  • For example, if someone donates a large sum of money to a charity, they might be praised as “righteous.”
  • In a discussion about social justice, someone might say, “We need to fight for righteous causes.”
  • A person might defend their actions by saying, “I did what I believed was righteous in that situation.”

4. Fair and square

When something is “fair and square,” it means it is honest and equitable. It implies that there is no cheating or deception involved in a particular situation or outcome.

  • For instance, if two teams compete in a game and one wins without any controversy, it can be said that they won “fair and square.”
  • In a discussion about a fair distribution of resources, someone might argue, “We need to ensure that everyone gets their fair and square share.”
  • A person might defend their victory by saying, “I beat him fair and square. There was no cheating involved.”

5. On point

When something is “on point,” it means it is accurate and relevant. It implies that a statement or action is precisely addressing the matter at hand.

  • For example, if someone gives a presentation and all their points are relevant and well-supported, it can be said that their presentation was “on point.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might compliment an outfit by saying, “Your style is always on point.”
  • A person might say, “His criticism was on point. He really understood the issue and provided valuable insights.”

6. Valid

This term refers to something that is based on truth or fact and can be supported or proven. It often implies that there is a good reason or evidence to support a claim or action.

  • For example, “His argument was valid because he provided strong evidence.”
  • In a discussion about a decision, someone might say, “I think her concerns are valid and should be considered.”
  • A person might defend their actions by stating, “I had a valid reason for breaking the rules.”

7. Warranted

This word suggests that there is a good reason or justification for something. It implies that there is a valid basis for taking a particular action or making a decision.

  • For instance, “Given the circumstances, his reaction was warranted.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “The evidence presented clearly warrants further investigation.”
  • A person might say, “I believe his behavior warranted disciplinary action.”

8. Deserved

This term implies that someone has received or achieved something as a result of their actions or qualities. It suggests that the outcome is justified based on their efforts or deservingness.

  • For example, “She worked hard and deserved the promotion.”
  • In a discussion about a punishment, someone might say, “He deserved the consequences of his actions.”
  • A person might argue, “The team deserved to win because they put in the effort and played well.”

9. Reasonable

This word suggests that something is logical, sensible, or fair. It implies that a decision or action is justified based on common sense or rational thinking.

  • For instance, “Her request for more time seemed reasonable given the circumstances.”
  • In a negotiation, someone might say, “Let’s find a reasonable compromise that works for both parties.”
  • A person might defend their opinion by stating, “I think my position is reasonable because it considers all the facts.”

10. Defensible

This term implies that something can be justified or defended against criticism or opposition. It suggests that there are valid reasons or arguments to support a particular position or action.

  • For example, “His decision is defensible because he considered all the possible outcomes.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I believe my stance on this issue is defensible based on the available evidence.”
  • A person might argue, “While controversial, his actions are defensible when you understand the context.”

11. Sound

When something is “sound” in the context of justification, it means that it is reasonable, logical, and well-founded. It implies that there is a solid basis or evidence to support a decision or action.

  • For example, “His argument for the new policy was sound and convinced everyone.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I have sound reasons to believe that my position is correct.”
  • A lawyer might argue in court, “The evidence presented is sound and proves my client’s innocence.”

12. Rational

Being “rational” means that a decision or action is based on logical thinking and sound judgment. It implies that there is a logical and coherent explanation behind the justification.

  • For instance, “It’s rational to save money for emergencies.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “Let’s approach this problem in a rational manner.”
  • A psychologist might explain, “People with mental health issues can still make rational decisions with the right support.”

13. Vindicated

To be “vindicated” means to be proven right or justified in a particular situation. It implies that one’s actions or beliefs were justified and validated by subsequent events or evidence.

  • For example, “After being accused of cheating, he was vindicated when the truth came out.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I feel vindicated now that my position has been supported by experts.”
  • A whistleblower might say, “I knew I would be vindicated once the truth was revealed.”

14. Excusable

When something is “excusable,” it means that it can be forgiven or justified due to mitigating circumstances. It implies that there is a valid reason or explanation that lessens the severity of the action.

  • For instance, “His lateness was excusable because of the heavy traffic.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “While his behavior was inappropriate, it’s somewhat excusable given the stressful situation.”
  • A teacher might say, “I understand your mistake, but it’s not excusable to cheat on the test.”

15. Legally sound

When something is “legally sound,” it means that it is in accordance with the law and can be justified within the legal framework. It implies that there is no legal basis to challenge or dispute the decision or action.

  • For example, “The contract is legally sound and protects both parties.”
  • In a court case, a lawyer might argue, “The evidence presented proves that our client’s actions were legally sound.”
  • A legal expert might explain, “For a law to be considered legally sound, it must adhere to constitutional principles and established precedents.”

16. Ethical

When something is considered ethical, it means that it aligns with moral principles and is deemed morally right or acceptable.

  • For example, a person might say, “It is not ethical to cheat on a test.”
  • In a discussion about business practices, someone might argue, “Companies should prioritize ethical behavior over profits.”
  • A person might defend their actions by saying, “I made an ethical decision based on what I believed was right.”

17. Reasoned

When something is reasoned, it means that it is based on logical thinking and careful consideration.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I have a reasoned argument for why we should invest in renewable energy.”
  • In a debate, someone might counter an argument by saying, “Your point lacks reasoned analysis.”
  • A person might explain their decision by saying, “After much reasoned thought, I believe this is the best course of action.”

18. Validated

When something is validated, it means that it has been confirmed or proven to be true or acceptable.

  • For example, a person might say, “My ideas were validated by the positive feedback I received.”
  • In a scientific study, researchers might validate their findings through rigorous experimentation and analysis.
  • A person might seek validation from others by saying, “Do you think my feelings are justified?”

19. Substantiated

When something is substantiated, it means that it is supported with evidence or proof.

  • For instance, a person might say, “The claims made in the article are not substantiated by reliable sources.”
  • In a court of law, evidence is presented to substantiate the claims being made.
  • A person might defend their position by saying, “I have substantiated my argument with extensive research and data.”

20. Warrantable

When something is warrantable, it means that it is able to be justified or warranted.

  • For example, a person might say, “The use of force was deemed warrantable in this situation.”
  • In a discussion about government actions, someone might argue, “Not all actions taken by the government are warrantable.”
  • A person might explain their decision by saying, “Given the circumstances, I believe my actions were warrantable.”

21. Justifiable

This term refers to something that is able to be justified or defended with good reason or evidence. It suggests that there is a logical or reasonable basis for the action or decision.

  • For example, “His decision to leave the company was justifiable because of the toxic work environment.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “The government’s decision to increase taxes is justifiable in order to fund public services.”
  • A person might say, “I feel guilty about buying this expensive item, but it’s justifiable because I’ve been saving up for it.”

22. Defendable

This term indicates that something can be defended or supported with valid arguments or evidence. It suggests that there are logical reasons or justifications for a particular action or belief.

  • For instance, “Her position on the issue is defendable because she has conducted extensive research.”
  • In a court case, a defense attorney might argue, “My client’s actions were defendable based on self-defense.”
  • A person might say, “I believe my opinion is defendable because I have personal experience in the matter.”

23. Supportable

This term means that something can be supported or backed up with evidence, reasons, or resources. It suggests that there is sufficient justification or rationale for a particular action or decision.

  • For example, “The project’s budget is supportable because we have secured enough funding.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial policy, someone might argue, “The new law is supportable based on statistical data and expert opinions.”
  • A person might say, “I find her argument supportable because she has provided strong evidence to back up her claims.”

24. On the level

This phrase implies that something is honest, sincere, or trustworthy. It suggests that a person or situation is legitimate and can be relied upon.

  • For instance, “I can assure you that this business deal is on the level and you can trust my intentions.”
  • In a conversation about a suspicious activity, someone might say, “I don’t think he’s on the level. There’s something fishy about his story.”
  • A person might reassure others by saying, “Don’t worry, everything we’re doing is on the level and within the law.”

25. Aboveboard

This term indicates that something is open, honest, and without deception. It suggests that there are no hidden agendas or ulterior motives.

  • For example, “The company’s financial transactions are always aboveboard, with everything properly documented.”
  • In a discussion about a political campaign, someone might say, “We need to ensure that all donations are aboveboard to maintain public trust.”
  • A person might claim, “I have nothing to hide. My intentions are aboveboard and I’m acting in everyone’s best interest.”

26. Square deal

A “square deal” refers to a fair and honest agreement or arrangement between parties. It implies that all parties involved are treated equally and receive fair treatment.

  • For example, in a negotiation, someone might say, “Let’s make sure we all get a square deal.”
  • When discussing a business transaction, one might say, “I want to ensure that both parties walk away with a square deal.”
  • In a discussion about fairness, someone might argue, “Everyone deserves a square deal, regardless of their background or circumstances.”

27. Authorized

To be “authorized” means to be given official permission or approval to do something. It implies that the person or entity has the legal or legitimate right to engage in a particular activity.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I am authorized to access this restricted area.”
  • When discussing a document or contract, someone might ask, “Is this signature authorized?”
  • In a discussion about government actions, one might argue, “The president is authorized to make executive decisions within certain limits.”

28. Verified

To be “verified” means to be confirmed as true or accurate. It implies that the information or claim has been thoroughly checked and validated.

  • For example, on social media platforms, a user might have a “verified” badge next to their name, indicating that their identity has been confirmed.
  • When discussing a news article, someone might ask, “Is this information verified?”
  • In a debate, one might say, “We should only rely on verified sources for accurate information.”

29. Fair dinkum

The term “fair dinkum” is Australian slang for something that is genuine, honest, or true. It can also imply that someone is being sincere or telling the truth.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Are you being fair dinkum?” they are questioning the sincerity of the person’s statement.
  • When discussing a product’s authenticity, one might say, “This is a fair dinkum Rolex watch.”
  • In a conversation, someone might exclaim, “I’m telling you, mate, this story is fair dinkum!”

30. Equitable

To be “equitable” means to be fair and impartial. It implies that all parties involved are treated justly and in a balanced manner.

  • For example, when discussing the distribution of resources, one might say, “We need to find an equitable solution.”
  • In a debate about social justice, someone might argue, “An equitable society ensures equal opportunities for all.”
  • When discussing a legal case, one might ask, “Was the verdict equitable?”

31. Rightful

This term refers to something that is morally or legally justified.

  • For example, “He claimed his rightful inheritance after his father’s passing.”
  • In a discussion about property rights, someone might say, “Everyone should be able to live in their rightful home.”
  • A person defending their actions might argue, “I took what was rightfully mine.”

32. Square

In the context of “justified,” this term means to be honest or fair in one’s actions or decisions.

  • For instance, “I always try to play square and follow the rules.”
  • In a debate about justice, someone might argue, “The punishment should fit the crime and be square.”
  • A person defending their choices might say, “I made a square deal with him, and we both benefited.”

33. Legitimate

This term refers to something that is considered valid or acceptable according to rules or standards.

  • For example, “He had a legitimate reason for being late to the meeting.”
  • In a discussion about government actions, someone might say, “The people have the right to question the legitimacy of their leaders.”
  • A person explaining their actions might argue, “I had a legitimate concern for my safety, so I took appropriate measures.”

34. Condoned

To “condone” something means to accept or allow it, often despite disapproval or criticism.

  • For instance, “His behavior was condoned by the higher-ups, even though it violated company policies.”
  • In a discussion about ethics, someone might argue, “We must not condone actions that harm others.”
  • A person defending their choices might say, “I made a mistake, but it was not condoned by anyone.”

35. Approved

This term refers to something that has been officially accepted or sanctioned by an authority.

  • For example, “The project was approved by the board of directors.”
  • In a discussion about regulations, someone might say, “Only approved materials can be used in this construction.”
  • A person explaining their actions might argue, “I acted according to the approved guidelines.”

36. Permissible

This term refers to something that is allowed or permitted according to rules, laws, or standards. It suggests that an action or behavior is within the bounds of what is considered acceptable.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Talking during class is not permissible.”
  • In a discussion about ethics, someone might argue, “Lying is never permissible, regardless of the circumstances.”
  • A person might ask, “Is it permissible to bring outside food into the theater?”

37. Acceptable

This word indicates that something is considered suitable, proper, or satisfactory. It implies that a course of action or behavior meets the required standards or expectations.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “Using foul language is not acceptable in this house.”
  • In a debate, someone might state, “The proposed solution is not acceptable because it does not address the root cause.”
  • A person might ask, “Is it socially acceptable to wear jeans to a wedding?”

38. Defended

This term suggests that a particular action, decision, or belief is supported by valid reasons or arguments. It implies that there is a logical or moral basis for standing up for or protecting something.

  • For example, a lawyer might say, “My client’s actions were defended by self-defense laws.”
  • In a discussion about personal boundaries, someone might assert, “Setting boundaries is important and should be defended.”
  • A person might ask, “How can the use of force be defended in this situation?”

39. Supported

This word indicates that there is evidence, reasoning, or assistance that confirms or strengthens a particular position, argument, or decision. It implies that there is a foundation of support or endorsement for a certain belief or action.

  • For instance, a scientist might say, “The research data supported the hypothesis.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial topic, someone might state, “I feel supported in my stance by the opinions of experts.”
  • A person might ask, “Are there any studies that support the use of this medication?”

40. Satisfactory

This term suggests that something meets the basic requirements or expectations. It implies that a situation, outcome, or solution is sufficient or acceptable, even if it may not be exceptional or ideal.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Your work is satisfactory, but it could be improved with more effort.”
  • In a performance review, someone might comment, “The employee’s performance was satisfactory, but there is room for growth.”
  • A person might ask, “Is a satisfactory outcome enough, or should we aim for excellence?”
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